This list of knots includes many alternative names for common knots and lashings. Knot names have evolved over time, and there are many conflicting or confusing naming issues. The overhand knot, for example, is also known as the thumb knot. The figure-eight knot is also known as the Savoy knot or the Flemish knot.

  • Bachmann knot – friction hitch useful when the knot needs to be reset quickly/often
  • Bag knot (miller's knot) – binding knot used to secure the opening of a sack or bag
  • Bait loop (bumper knot) – secures soft or loose bait in fishing
  • Bale sling hitch – continuous loop of strap to form a cow hitch around an object
  • Barrel hitch (barrel sling) – suspends an object
  • Barrel knot (blood knot) – joins sections of monofilament nylon line while maintaining much of the line's inherent strength
  • Basket weave knot – a family of bend and lanyard knots with a regular pattern
  • Becket hitch – any hitch made on an eye loop
  • Beer knot – bend used in tubular webbing as in slings used in rock climbing
  • Bimini twist – fishing knot used for offshore trolling and sportsfishing
  • Blackwall hitch – temporary means of attaching a rope to a hook
  • Blake's hitch – friction hitch commonly used by arborists and tree climbers as an ascending knot
  • Blimp knot [ru] (Zeppelin bend)
  • Blood knot (barrel knot) – joins sections of monofilament nylon line while maintaining much of the line's inherent strength
  • Blood loop knot (dropper loop) – forms a loop which is off to the side of the line
  • Boa knot – binding knot
  • Boom hitch – attach a line to a fixed object like a pipe
  • Bottle sling (jug sling) – used to create a handle for a container with a narrow tapering neck
  • Bourchier knot – a variety of heraldic knot
  • Bowen knot (heraldic knot) – not a true knot (an unknot), a continuous loop of rope laid out as an upright square shape with loops at each of the four corners
  • Bowline – forms a fixed loop at the end of a rope
  • Boling knot (archaic term for the Bowline) – forms a fixed loop at the end of a rope
  • Bowline bend [fr]
  • Bowline on a bight – makes a pair of fixed-size loops in the middle of a rope
  • Bumper knot – secures soft or loose bait in fishing
  • Bunny ears (double figure-eight loop)
  • Buntline hitch – attach a rope to an object
  • Butterfly bend – connects two ends of rope
  • Butterfly coil – a method for storing and transporting a climbing rope
  • Butterfly loop – forms a fixed loop in the middle of a rope
  • Garda hitch (alpine clutch) climbing knot that lets the rope move in only one direction
  • Girth hitch (cow hitch)
  • Good luck knot
  • Gordian knot – (mythical knot) an inextricable/complicated knot, tied by King Gordius of Phrygia, that Alexander the Great cut with a sword
  • Grantchester knot – a method of tying a necktie
  • Granny knot – secures a rope or line around an object
  • Grief knot – (what knot) combines features of granny knot and thief knot
  • Gripping sailor's hitch – used to tie one rope to another, or a rope to a pole, when the pull is lengthwise along the object
  • Ground-line hitch – attaches a rope to an object
  • Icicle hitch – excellent for connecting to a post when weight is applied to an end running parallel to the post in a specific direction
  • Improved clinch knot – used for securing a fishing line to the fishing lure
  • In-line figure-eight loop (directional figure eight) – loop knot that can be made on the bight
  • Italian hitch (Munter hitch) – simple knot commonly used by climbers and cavers as part of a life-lining or belay system
  • Jack Ketch's knot (hangman's knot) – well-known knot most often associated with its use in hanging a person
  • Jamming knot – for constricting a bundle of objects
  • Jug sling a.k.a. bottle sling – used to create a handle for a glass or ceramic container with a slippery, narrow, tapering neck
  • Jury mast knot – for jury rigging a temporary mast on a sailboat or ship
  • Karash double loop – A knot used to form leg loops as a makeshift harness
  • Killick hitch – hitch knot used to attach a rope to oddly shaped objects
  • Klemheist knot – a.k.a French Machard knot or just Machard knot. Friction hitch that grips a rope when weight is applied, and is free to move when the weight is released
  • Knot of isis – ancient Egyptian symbol of the goddess Isis; similar to a knot used to secure the garments that the Egyptian gods wore
  • Knotless knot
  • Knute hitch
  • Lariat loop a.k.a. honda knot – loop knot commonly used in a lasso
  • Lark's foot (Lark's head, cow hitch) used to attach a rope to an object
  • Lapp knot
  • Left-hand bowline (cowboy bowline) – variation of the bowline loop knot
  • Ligature knot a.k.a. surgeon's knot – simple modification to the reef knot that adds an extra twist when tying the first throw
  • Lighterman's hitch (tugboat hitch) – ideal for heavy towing, or making fast to a post, bollard, or winch
  • Lineman's loop (butterfly loop) – used to form a fixed loop in the middle of a rope
  • Lissajous knot – knot defined by parametric equations
  • Lobster buoy hitch – similar to the buntline hitch, but made with a cow hitch around the standing part rather than a clove hitch
  • Machard knot – see Klemheist knot
  • Magnus hitch (rolling hitch) – used to attach a rope to a rod, pole, or other rope
  • Manharness knot (artillery loop) – knot with a loop on the bight for non-critical purposes
  • Matthew Walker knot – decorative knot that is used to keep the end of a rope from fraying
  • Marlinespike hitch – temporary knot used to attach a rod to a rope in order to form a handle
  • Marline hitching [de]
  • Midshipman's hitch – similar to the (taut-line hitch) – adjustable loop knot for use on lines under tension
  • Miller's knot – binding knot used to secure the opening of a sack or bag
  • Monkey's fist – looks somewhat like a small bunched fist/paw, most often used as the weight in a heaving line
  • Mountaineer's coil – method used by climbers for carrying a rope
  • Munter hitch – simple knot commonly used by climbers and cavers as part of a life-lining or belay system
  • Nail knot – used in fly fishing to attach the leader to the fly line
  • Nicky knot – a method of tying a necktie
  • Noose – loop at the end of a rope in which the knot slides to make the loop collapsible
  • Quick-release knot (Highwayman's hitch) – insecure, quick-release, draw loop hitch for trivial use
  • Tack knot[1]
  • Tape knot (water knot) – frequently used in climbing for joining two ends of webbing together
  • Tarbuck knot – used by climbers and was primarily used with stranded nylon rope
  • Taut-line hitch – adjustable loop knot for use on lines under tension
  • Tensionless hitch – an anchor knot used for rappelling or rope rescue.
  • Tent hitch (taut-line hitch) – adjustable loop knot for use on lines under tension
  • Thief knot – resembles the reef knot except that the free, or working, ends are on opposite sides
  • Threefoil knot – another term for a trefoil knot
  • Thumb knot a.k.a. overhand knot – one of the most fundamental knots and forms the basis of many others
  • Timber hitch – used to attach a single length of rope to a cylindrical object
  • Tom fool's knot – good knot with which to commence a slightly fancy sheepshank
  • Transom knot – to secure two linear objects, such as spars, at right angles to each other
  • Trefoil knot – simplest example of a nontrivial knot in mathematics
  • Trident loop – fixed loop knot
  • Trilene knot – a multi purpose fishing knot
  • Triple bowline – variation of the bowline knot that is used to create three loops on one knot simultaneously
  • Triple crown knot – non-communicating double loop knot. It is secure and symmetrical, but can jam when tightened.[2]
  • Triple fisherman's knot – a bend knot used to join two ends of rope together
  • Trucker's hitch – used for securing loads on trucks or trailers
  • True lover's knot – a name which has been used for many distinct knots
  • Tugboat hitch – ideal for heavy towing, or making fast to a post, bollard, or winch
  • Turle knot – used while fishing for tying a hook or fly to a leader
  • Twined Turk's head – decorative knot with a variable number of interwoven strands forming a closed loop
  • Tumble hitch
  • Two half-hitches – an overhand knot tied around a post, followed by a half-hitch
  • Two strand overhand knot (one-sided overhand bend) – used to join two ropes together
  • Wagoner's hitch – compound knot commonly used for securing loads on trucks or trailers
  • Wall knot
  • Wall and crown knot – used at the end of the ropes on either side of a gangway leading onto a ship
  • Water bowline – type of knot designed for use in wet conditions where other knots may slip or jam
  • Water knot – frequently used in climbing for joining two ends of webbing together
  • Waterman's knot – a bend with a symmetrical structure consisting of two overhand knots, each tied around the standing part of the other
  • West Country whipping – uses twine to secure the end of a rope to prevent it fraying
  • Windsor knot – a symmetrical knot used for tying a necktie around one's neck and collar

Sub-lists, by type

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See also

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References

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  1. ^ "How to tie a Tack". SelfMadeSailor. Retrieved 27 August 2023 – via www.youtube.com.
  2. ^ Ashley, Clifford W. (1944), The Ashley Book of Knots, New York: Doubleday, p. 199
  3. ^ Ashley, Clifford W. (1944). The Ashley Book of Knots, Doubleday, p.217, #1195. ISBN 0-385-04025-3 "The Zigzag Knot is a common Stake Hitch employed in lashing wagon, sled and truck loads"
  4. ^ Clyde Soles, Backpacker magazine’s outdoor knots: the knots you need to know, 2011, Morris Book Publishing LLC, p.101 ISBN 978-0-7627-5651-3
  5. ^ SebringSage. "Knot Tying: The Zig Zag Hitch". Retrieved 27 August 2023 – via YouTube.