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This is a list of hospitals in Brooklyn, sorted by hospital name, with addresses and a brief description of their formation and development. Hospital names were obtained from these sources.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] A list of hospitals in New York State is also available.

HospitalsEdit

  • Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center, 555 Rockaway Parkway, now also 1 Brookdale Plaza, Brooklyn. Opened as Brownsville and East New York Hospital on April 11, 1921, renamed Beth-El Hospital in 1932, renamed Brookdale Hospital Center in 1963, renamed Brookdale Hospital Medical Center in 1971, then renamed Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center.[11][12]
  • Brooklyn Hospital Center, 121 DeKalb Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded as Brooklyn City Hospital in 1845, renamed Brooklyn Hospital on February 10, 1883, merged with Caledonian Hospital and renamed Brooklyn Hospital-Caledonian Hospital in 1982, renamed Brooklyn Hospital in 1983, renamed Brooklyn Hospital Center in 1990. Its outpatient clinics include the site of the former Cumberland Hospital several blocks away.[13][14]
  • Brooklyn V.A. Medical Center, 800 Poly Place, Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Opened in 1950.[15]
  • Coney Island Hospital, 2601 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn. Opened as a first aid station near West 3rd Street in 1875, moved to a rented building on Sea Breeze Avenue and named Reception Hospital on May 12, 1902, but also called Sea Breeze Hospital and Coney Island Reception Hospital, officially part of Kings County Hospital, and open only for seasonal care from April through October. Moved to its current location, opened full-time, and renamed Coney Island Hospital on May 18, 1910.[16]
  • Interfaith Medical Center, 1545 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn. Formed in 1982 by merger and consolidation of Jewish Hospital and Medical Center and St. John's Episcopal Hospital of Brooklyn in 1982. Former Jewish Hospital at 555 Prospect Place is now apartments.[13][17]
  • Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, 585 Schenectady Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened on April 24, 1929 as the Jewish Sanitarium for Incurables, renamed the Jewish Sanitarium and Hospital for Chronic Diseases in 1933, renamed Jewish Chronic Disease Hospital in 1954, became an acute medical care hospital and renamed Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center in 1968.[18][19][20]
  • Kings County Hospital Center, 451 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened in 1837. In 1955 absorbed Kingston Avenue Hospital, which opened in 1891 as a Hospital for Contagious Diseases.[21][22][23]
  • Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn. Its constituent institutions were The New Utrecht Dispensary, which opened at 1275 37th Street in 1911 was renamed Israel Hospital when it became a hospital; Zion Hospital, which opened at 2140 Cropsey Avenue in 1911; and Beth Moses Hospital, which opened at 404 Hart Street on October 24, 1920. Israel and Zion Hospitals merged in May 1920 to form Israel Zion Hospital and opened at 10th Avenue and 48th Street on September 17, 1922. Israel Zion merged with Beth Moses Hospital to form Maimonides Hospital on July 30, 1947, and acute medical services were consolidated at the Israel Zion location. Renamed Maimonides Medical Center in 1996.[24][25][26][27][28][29]
  • Mount Sinai Brooklyn, 3201 Kings Highway. Opened as Kings Highway Hospital in 1947, renamed Beth Israel-Kings Highway Division when acquired by Beth Israel Medical Center in 1995, renamed Beth Israel Brooklyn on February 27, 2012, renamed Mount Sinai Beth Israel Brooklyn on January 22, 2014 following the merger of Mount Sinai and Beth Israel, renamed Mount Sinai Brooklyn on July 20, 2015.[30][31][32]
  • New York Community Hospital, 2525 Kings Highway, Brooklyn. Founded as Madison Park Hospital in 1929. Later Hospital of the Jacques Lowe Foundation. Renamed Community Hospital of Brooklyn in the mid-1960s. Became New York Community Hospital when it was acquired by New York-Presbyterian Hospital in 1997.
  • NewYork-Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, 506 6th Street, Brooklyn. Incorporated on May 27, 1881, opened as the Methodist Episcopal Hospital in the City of Brooklyn on December 15, 1887, renamed Methodist Hospital of Brooklyn in 1939, renamed New York Methodist hospital upon its affiliation with New York-Presbyterian Hospital in 1993.[33][34][35]
  • NYU Lutheran Medical Center, 150 55th Street, Brooklyn. Founded by Sister Elisabeth Fedde as the Norwegian Lutheran Deaconess Home and Hospital at 441 4th Avenue in 1883,[36] moved to 4520 4th Avenue in 1889, merged with Lutheran Hospital of Manhattan to form Our Savior's Lutheran Hospital in July 1956[37] and then renamed Lutheran Medical Center, moved to its current site in 1977, renamed NYU Lutheran Medical Center upon its affiliation with N.Y.U. in 2015.[38]
  • University Hospital of Brooklyn, 450 Clarkson Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded as the Brooklyn German General Dispensary at 132 Court Street in March 1856, moved to 145 Court Street in 1857, renamed the St. John's Hospital on November 6, 1857, renamed Long Island College Hospital on February 4, 1858, incorporated March 6, 1858, moved to the Perry Mansion on Henry Street between Amity and Pacific Streets May 1, 1858. The college and the hospital separated in 1930, the college was re-chartered as the Long Island College of Medicine in 1931 and merged into the State University of New York on April 5, 1950. The hospital opened in the 1960s.[39][40]
  • Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center, 760 Broadway at Flushing Avenue, Brooklyn. Named for Richard M. Woodhull, the original owner of the site, by Victor Morales, a local student at Intermediate School 318, who traced his origins. Opened on May 24, 1982.[41][42]
  • Wyckoff Heights Medical Center, 374 Stockholm Street, Brooklyn. Founded as German Hospital in 1889, dedicated at St. Nicholas Avenue and Stanhope Street on May 21, 1899, and opened later that year. Renamed Wyckoff Heights Hospital because of anti-German sentiment after World War 1, then renamed Wyckoff Heights Medical Center. The address has changed because of additional buildings, but it is still on the original block.[43][44][45]

Closed hospitalsEdit

 
Greenpoint Hospital
 
Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn
  • Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn, 555 Prospect Place, Brooklyn. Opened as a dispensary at 70 Johnson Avenue, incorporated as Jewish Hospital on November 9, 1901, opened on December 17, 1906, renamed Jewish Hospital and Medical Center of Brooklyn by 1968, merged with St. John's Episcopal Hospital of Brooklyn to become Interfaith Medical Center in 1982 and moved into St. John's facilities. The building is now apartments.[13][17][61][62]
  • Jewish Sanitarium and Hospital for Chronic Diseases, East 49th Street at Rutland Road, Brooklyn. See Kingsbrook Jewish Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Jewish Sanitarium for Incurables, East 49th Street at Rutland Road, Brooklyn. See Kingsbrook Jewish Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Kings Highway Hospital, Brooklyn. See Mount Sinai Brooklyn, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Kingston Avenue Hospital, Brooklyn.
  • Kingsway Hospital, 4422 Avenue J, Brooklyn
  • Lefferts General Hospital, 460 Lefferts Avenue, Brooklyn. Closed in 1993. Building demolished, replaced by a girl's Yeshiva.
  • Lefferts Maternity Hospital, 104-37 Lefferts Boulevard, Richmond Hill, Queens.
 
Linden General Hospital
  • Linden General Hospital, 501 New Lots Avenue, Brooklyn. Now a homeless shelter.
  • Long Island College Hospital, 339 Hicks Street, Brooklyn. Founded as the Brooklyn German General Dispensary at 132 Court Street in March 1856, moved to 145 Court Street in 1857, renamed the St. John's Hospital on November 6, 1857, renamed Long Island College Hospital on February 4, 1858, incorporated March 6, 1858, moved to the Perry Mansion on Henry Street between Amity and Pacific Streets May 1, 1858, closed in 2014.[39][63]
  • Lutheran Hospital of Brooklyn, 22 Junius Street, Brooklyn. Opened in 1881, closed on August 15, 1979.[64][65] buildings razed in the 1980s.[66]
  • Madison Park Hospital, 2525 Kings Highway, Brooklyn. Renamed Community Hospital of Brooklyn in the early 1960s, renamed New York Community Hospital when it was acquired by New York-Presbyterian Hospital in 1997.
  • Menorah Maternity Hospital, Rockaway Parkway & Avenue A, Brooklyn.
  • Midwood Hospital, 19 Winthrop Street, Brooklyn. Open prior to 1940 and to at least 1973. Was St. John's Elementary School (a private school) from 1979 to 2000. Now Midwood Sanitorium.
  • Norwegian Lutheran Deaconess Hospital, 4520 Fourth Avenue, Brooklyn. See N.Y.U. Lutheran Hospital, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Ocean Hill Memorial Dispensary and Hospital, Brooklyn. Originally named Bedford Dispensary and Hospital, name changed in 1920.[46]
  • Prospect Heights Hospital, 775 Washington Ave, Brooklyn. Founded as the Brooklyn Homeopathic Lying-In Asylum in 1871, renamed Brooklyn Maternity Hospital on June 21, 1875, renamed Prospect Heights Hospital on September 12, 1902. Merged with Long Island College Hospital in the 1960s. Now senior housing.[54]
  • Reception Hospital. This name was used for a hospital on Sea Breeze Avenue in Brooklyn that transferred patients to Kings County Hospital and then became Coney Island Hospital. (A hospital with the same name was located in the Storehouse Building on Blackwell's Island that transferred patients to the City, Metropolitan, and Central and Neurological Hospitals on Blackwell's Island.)
  • Riverdale Hospital, Brooklyn. (See Linden General)
  • St. Catharine's Hospital, 133 or 250 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded in 1869. Now senior housing.[50][67]
  • St. Cecilia's Maternity Hospital, 484 Humboldt Street, Brooklyn. Now apartments.
  • St. Charles Hospital, 277 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, now apartments.
  • St. Christopher's Hospital for Babies, 283 Hicks Street, Brooklyn. Established in 1896.[68]
  • St. Giles Hospital, 1346 President Street, Brooklyn. Opened by Sister Sarah, an Episcopal nun, on Degraw Street in 1891, moved to President Street in 1916, closed in 1978. The hospital cared for crippled children, many of whom had had polio, and the polio vaccine made it unnecessary. Now St. Mark's School, a Catholic day school.[69]
  • St. John's Episcopal Hospital, 1545 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn. Founded in 1871, merged with Jewish Hospital and Medical Center of Brooklyn to become Interfaith Medical Center in 1982, with Jewish Hospital moving into St. John's facilities.[13][17][50][70]
  • St. Mary's Female Hospital, 155 Dean Street, Brooklyn. Maternity.
  • St. Mary's Hospital, 170 Buffalo Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened in 1877, closed October 4, 2005.[68][71]
  • St. Peter's Hospital, 380 Henry Street, Brooklyn. Founded on September 23, 1864. Now a Cobble Hill Nursing Home.[50][72]
  • Samaritan Hospital, 759 President Street, Brooklyn. Founded in 1906.
  • Seney Hospital, Brooklyn. An alternative but unofficial name for New York Methodist Hospital. See the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.
  • Shore Road Hospital, 9000 Shore Road, Brooklyn. Opened 1927. Demolished 1977. Now senior housing.
  • Sister Elizabeth Maternity Hospital, 362 51st Street, Brooklyn. Now a social services agency.
  • Swedish Hospital, 1350 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened at 126 Rogers Avenue on June 24, 1906, moved to 1350 Bedford Avenue on October 3, 1939, closed in September 1975. Now apartments.[73][74][75]
  • Unity Hospital, 1545 Saint John's Place, Brooklyn, now apartments.
  • Victory Memorial Hospital, 9036 7th Avenue, Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Opened in 1927, closed in 2006, now SUNY Downstate at Bay Ridge, an outpatient clinic that is part of SUNY Downstate Medical Center. It was known locally as the "Baby Hospital."[76]
  • Williamsburg General Hospital, 757 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn. Opened as Brooklyn Throat Hospital on April 26, 1889, renamed in 1898. Now apartments.[56]
  • Williamsburg Maternity Hospital, 753 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn.
  • Willamsburgh Hospital South Third Street and Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn.
  • Zion Hospital, 2140 Cropsey Avenue, Brooklyn. See Maimonides Medical Center, in the section on hospitals in Brooklyn above.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Richmond, Rev. J.F. (1872). New York and Its Institutions (1609-1873). New York, N.Y.: E.B. Treat. p. 480.
  2. ^ Standing Committee on Hospitals (January 1, 1908). New Hospitals Needed in Greater New York - Recommendations by the Standing Committee on Hospitals of the State Charities Aid Association with a Report on Present Conditions and Future Needs. Albany, N.Y.: State Charities Aid Association of New York. pp. 79–82. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  3. ^ The Medical Directory of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, 1909: volume 11. New York, N.Y.: Medical Society of the State of New York. 1909. pp. 705–724. Retrieved September 28, 2015.
  4. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York, 137th Session, 1914 (vol. 23, no. 57, part 3 ed.). Albany, N.Y. 1914. pp. 226–229, 281–299, 369, 476–512, 616–620, 648–649. Retrieved September 28, 2015.
  5. ^ Walsh, James J. (1919). History of Medicine in New York - Three Centuries of Medical Progress. New York, N.Y.: National Americana Society. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  6. ^ "Approved Hospitals in This Area". New York Times. October 17, 1939. p. 22. Retrieved October 7, 2015.
  7. ^ "Hospitals in New York State - Profiles". health.ny.gov. New York State Department of Health. Retrieved October 7, 2015.
  8. ^ Directory of Activities of Public and Private Welfare Agencies (2 (revised January 1, 1921) ed.). City of New York Department of Public Welfare. September 29, 1920. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  9. ^ "62 Hospitals Win City Endorsement - Ony 7 Others in Proprietary Group Fail to Meet New Set of Standards - They, Too, Will Comply - Failure to Do So Would Mean Loss of Their Licenses, Dr. Goldwater Says". New York Times. September 30, 1936. p. 21. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  10. ^ "Hospitals Approved by Surgeons". New York Times. February 1, 1946. p. 17. Retrieved October 17, 2015.
  11. ^ Abelow, Samuel (1937). History of Brooklyn Jewry. 1098 Park Place, Brooklyn, N.Y.: Scheba Publishing. pp. 222–227. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  12. ^ "Brookdale - History". brookdalehospital.org. Brookdale University Hospital Medical Center. Retrieved October 5, 2015.
  13. ^ a b c d e Sullivan, Ronald (December 3, 1981). "Four Brooklyn Hospitals Plan to Merge Into Two New Ones". New York Times. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  14. ^ a b "History of the Brooklyn Hospital Center". The Brooklyn Hospital Center. Archived from the original on December 17, 2007. Retrieved September 27, 2015.
  15. ^ "Administrator of Veterans' Affairs - Annual Report for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1950" (PDF). va.gov. United States Veterans' Administration. Retrieved October 12, 2015.
  16. ^ Walsh (1919), p. 851.
  17. ^ a b c Sullivan, Ronald (December 17, 1982). "Hospitals Merge, Joining Two Faiths in Deprived Area". New York Times. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  18. ^ Abelow (1937), pp. 227-230, and 336.
  19. ^ "25-Year-Old Hospital Employing New Name". New York Daily News. July 8, 1954.
  20. ^ "1,200 to Attend Hospital Fete". New York Daily News. May 16, 1968.
  21. ^ Ostrander, Stephen M. (1894). A History of the City of Brooklyn and Kings County, volume 2. Brooklyn, N.Y.: by subscription. p. 223. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  22. ^ Bolduan, Charles F. (March 1916). Over a Century of Health Administration in New York City - Monograph Series, no. 13. New York, N.Y.: New York City Department of Health. p. 24. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  23. ^ "TB Patients Moved - 28 Children Taken to Kings County Hospital Center". New York Times. January 26, 1956. p. 19. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  24. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 243.
  25. ^ Walsh (1919), p. 817.
  26. ^ "Beth Moses Hospital Dedicated". New York Times. October 25, 1920. p. 11. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  27. ^ Abelow (1937), pp. 218-222.
  28. ^ "Two Hospitals Merge in South Brooklyn - Beth Moses and Israel Zion to be Known as Maimonides - 'Acute' and 'Chronic' Care Units". New York Times. July 31, 1947. p. 22. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  29. ^ "Maimonides Celebrates 100 Years of Excellence and Innovation in its Department of Medicine". maimonidesmed.org. Maimonides Medical Center. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  30. ^ "Seven Hospital Campuses and a Single Medical School Serve as Basis for Integrated Health Care System" (PDF). wehealny.org. Beth Israel Medical Center. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  31. ^ "Beth Israel Medical Center Renames Its Brooklyn Division "Beth Israel Brooklyn" (press release)" (PDF). wehealny.org. Beth Israel Medical Center. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  32. ^ "Mount Sinai Health System Launches Major Advertising Campaign". mountsinai.org. Mount Sinai Hospital. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  33. ^ "For The Care Of The Sick - A New And Splendid Brooklyn Hospital Dedicated". New York Times. December 16, 1887. p. 8. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  34. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 290-291.
  35. ^ "New York Methodist Hospital - Celebrating 125 Years of Service" (PDF). nym.org. New York Methodist Hospital. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  36. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 291.
  37. ^ "Two Hospitals Merge". New York Times. July 30, 1956. p. 9. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  38. ^ "History of N.Y.U. Lutheran". lutheranhealthcare.org. Lutheran Medical Center. Retrieved September 27, 2015.
  39. ^ a b Raymond, Joseph (1899). History of The Long Island College Hospital and Its Graduates. Brooklyn, N.Y.: Association of the Alumni. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  40. ^ Termine, Jack E. (2000). SUNY Downstate Medical Center. Charleston, S.C.: Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 0-7385-0069-0. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  41. ^ "Woodhull Hospital - History". nyc.gov. New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  42. ^ "Woodhull Hospital Taking Patients". New York Times. May 24, 1982. Retrieved October 4, 2015.
  43. ^ "German Hospital Dedicated - Five Thousand People Attended the Exercises at the New Brooklyn Institution". New York Times. May 22, 1899. p. 12. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  44. ^ "Woman Gives $10,000 to a Hospital". New York Times. July 6, 1899. p. 12. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  45. ^ "When Brooklyn Dedicated its German Hospital". ephermeralnewyork.wordpress.com. Ephemeral New York. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  46. ^ a b "New Incorporations - Name Changes". New York Times. April 29, 1920. p. 23. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
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  48. ^ Standing Committee on Hospitals, (1908), p. 79.
  49. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), pp. 281-282.
  50. ^ a b c d e f g Ostrander (1894), p. 223.
  51. ^ "Opening of the Brooklyn Homeopathic Hospital". The New York Times. February 14, 1873. p. 12. Retrieved September 24, 2015.
  52. ^ a b "Last Patient Gone From Cumberland". New York Times. August 25, 1983. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  53. ^ a b Morris, Montrose. "Past and Present: Decades of Change for Fort Greene's Cumberland Street Hospital". brownstoner.com. Brownstoner. Retrieved September 27, 2015.
  54. ^ a b c Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 292.
  55. ^ Ostrander (1894) p. 223.
  56. ^ a b Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 298.
  57. ^ Abelow (1937), pp. 230-231.
  58. ^ "A Model Hospital". New York Times. January 13, 1919. p. 10. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  59. ^ Ostrander (1894), p. 134.
  60. ^ "Court Upholds Closing of Greenpoint Hospital". New York Times. July 16, 1982. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  61. ^ Abelow (1937), pp. 197-213.
  62. ^ "Hospital Association Elects New President". New York Times. April 25, 1968. p. 18. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  63. ^ Hartocollis, Anemona (May 23, 2014). "The End for Long Island College Hospital". New York Times. p. A20. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  64. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 289-290.
  65. ^ Rule, Sheila (August 17, 1979). "Hospital Board, Lacking Funds, Shuts Lutheran". New York Times. p. B3. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  66. ^ "Lutheran Hospital of Brooklyn Collection, 1881-1978". brooklynhistory.org. Brooklyn Historical Society. Retrieved September 27, 2015.
  67. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 293.
  68. ^ a b Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 294.
  69. ^ Morris, Montrose. "Building of the Day: 1346 President Street". brownstoner.com. Brooklyn Brownstoner. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  70. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 286.
  71. ^ Vandam, Jeff (October 16, 2005). "Lights Out". New York Times. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  72. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 295.
  73. ^ "Swedish Hospital Open - Dedicated After Ten Years' Work of Brooklyn Swedes". New York Times. June 25, 1906. p. 7. Retrieved October 25, 2015.
  74. ^ Documents of the Senate of the State of New York (1914), p. 297.
  75. ^ Lieberman, Gerald F. (December 21, 1975). "Closing of Swedish Hospital Sharply Cuts Beds for Alcoholics". New York Times. p. BQLI17. Retrieved October 25, 2015.
  76. ^ Mindlin, Alex (December 3, 2006). "Dark Days at the Baby Hospital". New York Times. Retrieved September 24, 2015.

External linksEdit

  Media related to Hospitals in New York City at Wikimedia Commons