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The highway system in Puerto Rico is composed of approximately 14,400 kilometers (8,900 mi)[1] of roads in Puerto Rico, maintained by the Puerto Rico Department of Transportation and Public Works (Spanish: Departmento de Transportación y Obras Públicas) or DTOP. The highway system in Puerto Rico is divided into four networks: primary, urban primary, secondary or inter-municipal, and tertiary or local (Spanish: red primaria, red primaria urbana, red secundaria o intermunicipal, and red terciaria o local).[1] Highways may change between networks and retain their same numbers.

Puerto Rico Highway System
Puerto Rico Primary Highway 1 markerPuerto Rico Urban Primary Highway 1 markerPuerto Rico Secondary Highway 1 markerPuerto Rico Tertiary Highway 1 marker
Highway shields for primary, urban primary, secondary and tertiary sections of PR-1
Highway names
InterstatesIntrastate PRnn (PRI-nn) (unsigned)
Commonwealth:Puerto Rico Highway nn (PR-nn)
System links

Contents

Highway markersEdit

 
Route number markers on PR-191 in 2009; on the left is the tertiary highway marker, in the middle is a Forest Highway marker, and on the right is a pre-1999 marker.

Puerto Rico roads are classified according to the network they belong to. There are four types: primary, urban primary, secondary, and tertiary.[1][2]

In this regard, a primary road is one which is part of the primary network, an urban primary road is part of the urban primary network, etc. Generally, the same highway may change between networks, but the highway will continue to have the same number. For example, PR-1, connecting Ponce and San Juan, is signed as urban primary inside the Ponce city limits, then it is signed as secondary in Ponce's rural barrio Capitanejo, and then it is again signed as urban primary on its entry into the town of Santa Isabel.

Primary roads are numbered 1 through 99, secondary roads are numbered 100 to 299, and tertiary roads are numbered 300 to 9999.[3] In 2009, primary routes comprise about 14% of the total Commonwealth system mileage, secondary about 30%, and tertiary (municipal) about 56% of the total mileage.[3]

Highway type/network Highway marker
for PR-1
Purpose[1] Route numbers[3]
Primary roads   Facilitate movement of passengers and freight between major regions in the Island (north, south, east, west) 1–99[a]
Urban primary roads   Complement the primary network inside a metro area (San Juan, Ponce, Mayagüez, Arecibo, Aguadilla, Humacao, Caguas and Guayama) Any
(1–9999)
Secondary (or inter-municipal) roads   Provide access to municipalities from primary network roads 100–299[a]
Tertiary (or intra-municipal) roads   Provide access to a municipality's main urban area from peripheral communities 300–9999
  1. ^ a b Just like some highways numbered 1–99 may have secondary or tertiary network type markers on specific segments of their roadways, some highways numbered 100–299 may have tertiary network markers—black numbers on white circles set against a black square—in specific segments of those highways as well to indicate that such portions of the highway are part of the tertiary network.

Less common markersEdit

Puerto Rico highway marker (pre-1999)
Puerto Rico National Forest road marker

At least two[1] other markers can be observed in Puerto Rico roads today (2019). The first is the older style road marker which, above the route number, also had the outline of the main island of Puerto Rico with the words Puerto Rico on the outline as shown here. Until 1999,[citation needed] all non-tolled numbered highways in Puerto Rico had the same route marker, a square with a white-on-black half-circle with the route number in the bottom two thirds and a map of Puerto Rico with the words Puerto Rico written inside in the top third. A second road marker, used on the road through El Yunque National Forest, is the brown-colored upside-down trapezoidal marker with the road number on the top two-thirds of the sign and the words Bosque Nacional (national forest) on the bottom one-third, as shown.

Roadway maintenanceEdit

All Puerto Rico Highway System roads, regardless of the classification used, are maintained by the centralized, Commonwealth-level, Departmento de Transportación y Obras Públicas (DTOP). Municipal governments are not responsible for maintenance of the Puerto Rico Highway System roads within their territory; whether or not the municipal government is an autonomous government, DTOP is the responsible agency.[4] The DTOP maintains a network of regional offices throughout the island which carry out DTOP work within their multi-municipality region. Municipal governments are only responsible for maintenance of city and town streets within their jurisdictions.[5] On occasion, the central government has entered into memoranda of agreement with municipal governments for the collaborative maintenance of some Puerto Rico Highway System roadways within their municipalities.[6][7]

Municipal roadsEdit

In Puerto Rico, the term municipal road may be encountered occasionally. This is not a “fourth” network of State roads. Roadways that have both their terminus within the same municipality are called tertiary roads and are, by convention, numbered PR-300 through PR-9999. Tertiary roads are also sometimes called Carreteras de la red local (English: Local network roads).[2]

However, the term municipal road or municipal highway (Spanish: Carretera municipal) refers to any public roadway that is not marked with a Puerto Rico road marker.[8] Roadways marked with a Puerto Rico road marker are those public roadways that include PR followed by a number in its markers. Such roads are considered State roads and part of the Puerto Rico Highway System. Public roadways that do not include such markings are termed municipal roadways. Unlike State roads, which are signed with numbers, municipal roads are signed with names, such as Calle Hostos, Calle De Diego, Calle San Jorge, Calle León M. Acuña.[8]

Tertiary roads are not municipal roads even though at times the term municipal road has been used (as a shortcut to intra-municipal road)—even by the Government of Puerto Rico—to refer to a tertiary State road.[3] The confusion comes from the context in which the phrase municipal road occurs. When the term municipal road occurs in the context of roads owned and maintained by the State government, municipal roads means tertiary State network roads. In this context, a municipal road and a State tertiary road both refer to the same network of State roads. However, if the term occurs in the context of roadways owned and maintained by a municipal government, it refers to the network of local streets and roadways that make up the urban landscape of a municipality.

Another context sometimes encountered is the context of how a road is used, that is, the purpose of a road. The purpose of a road is indicative of whether a road is a municipal road or not. In its strictest meaning, the term municipal roads refers to roads within a municipality's urban center that provide access from one urban neighborhood to another urban neighborhood within the same urban area (city, town, poblado, etc.), while in the larger context of the State highway system, municipal roads refers to roads that “provide access to the main urban area of a municipality from peripheral communities” (that is, tertiary roads).[1] Municipal roads are maintained by the municipal government where those roads occur, while tertiary roads are maintained by the State government. As stated under the section Road maintenance, at times the State government has entered into Memorandums of Agreement with municipal governments for the upkeep of a State tertiary roadway (note this is a State-owned road that runs entirely within a single municipality), but this does not make it a municipal road—the road continues to maintain its State signage and ownership.[6][7]

ExpresswaysEdit

 
The expressway Autopista Luis A. Ferré (PR-52) heading east from Juana Díaz towards Santa Isabel

Highways with control access fall into three types: An expressway is an arterial highway with full or partial control of access. Expressways with full control of access are termed freeways. If the freeway charges a toll for its use, it is called an Autopista.[3] Most tollbooths accept AutoExpreso, an electronic toll collection system, to avoid traffic congestion.[9][10]

All Puerto Rico expressways are signed either as primary or as primary urban routes.

Route Name Terminus Maximum speed limit Comments
PR-2 Expreso Kennedy Starts from San Patricio Plaza (Guaynabo) to Santurce (San Juan, aka Parada 18). 50 mph (80 km/h) Guaynabo to San Juan section only.
PR-2 Roberto Sánchez Vilella Starts from Mayagüez Mall (Mayagüez) to PR-1 in Ponce 55 mph (90 km/h) Mostly converted to expressway from Mayagüez Mall to Ponce.
PR-5 Expreso Río Hondo Bayamón, PR-22 to Naranjito, PR-147 and PR-149 with discontinuity between PR-199 in Bayamón and PR-167 in Toa Alta. 50 mph (80 km/h) Tolled. This road has three expressway segments as of April 2012—these are between PR-29 and PR-22 and between PR-2 and PR-199 (both in Bayamón), an unbuilt portion in southern Bayamón and a portion between PR-167 (Toa Alta) and the town of Naranjito.
PR-9 Baldorioty de Castro PR-10 Barrio Portugués to PR-2 Barrio El Tuque 55 miles per hour (89 km/h) to 65 miles per hour (105 km/h) From PR-123 to PR-2 still under construction
PR-12 Santiago de los Caballeros PR-14 Barrio Machuelo Abajo to PR-123 Barrio Playa 55 miles per hour (89 km/h)
PR-18 Expreso Las Américas PR-22 San Juan and PR-52 San Juan 55 to 65 mph (90 to 110 km/h)
PR-20 Expreso Rafael Martínez Nadal PR-2 in the San Patricio area in Guaynabo to PR-1 in La Muda sector in Caguas 55 mph (90 km/h) Tolled
PR-22 Autopista José de Diego Hatillo, PR-2 to San Juan, PR-26 65 mph (105 km/h) Extension to Aguadilla in planning. Tolled
PR-26 Expreso Román Baldorioty de Castro San Antonio Bridge (Bridge to Old San Juan Island) to PR-3 in Carolina. 65 mph (105 km/h)
PR-30 Expreso Cruz Ortiz Stella Caguas, PR-1 to Humacao, PR-53 55 mph (90 km/h)
PR-52 Autopista Luis A. Ferré Ponce, PR-2 to San Juan, PR-1 and PR-18 65 mph (105 km/h) Tolled. This highway is the longest tolled freeway in Puerto Rico.
PR-53 Autopista Dr. José Celso Barbosa Fajardo to Yabucoa, and then Guayama to Salinas. 65 mph (105 km/h) Maunabo tunnels constructed in October 2008. The segments between Yabucoa and Maunabo still incomplete.
PR-60 Avenida Dionisio Casillas Humacao, PR-30 to Humacao, PR-3 55 mph (90 km/h)
PR-66 Autopista Roberto Sánchez Vilella PR-3 in Carolina and Río Grande 65 mph (105 km/h) Second half opened in October 2012 to Río Grande. Tolled.
PR-165 Expreso El Caño Guaynabo, PR-2 and PR-23 to Cataño 50 mph (80 km/h)

List of highwaysEdit

Below is a list of some highways in Puerto Rico along with the municipalities where they begin and end.

Primary highwaysEdit

Primary roads are numbered in the 1 to 99 range and are distributed randomly throughout the island.

Number Length (mi) Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
  PR-1 PR-123 in Ponce Calle Tanca in San Juan Carretera Central
  PR-2 PR-1 / PR-133 in Ponce PR-26 in San Juan
  PR-2R PR-440 in Aguadilla PR-2 in Aguadilla Aguadilla business spur
  PR-2R PR-2 / PR-114 in Mayagüez PR-2 in Mayagüez Mayagüez business loop
  PR-2R 1.01[11] 1.63 PR-2 in Ponce PR-123 in Ponce Ponce business spur
  PR-3 PR-1 in Salinas PR-1 in San Juan
  PR-3R PR-3 in Humacao PR-3 in Humacao Humacao business loop
  PR-4 PR-17 in San Juan PR-26 in Carolina Became part of PR-8
  PR-4 PR-114 in Hormigueros PR-102 in San Germán Renumbered to PR-103 and PR-101
  PR-5 PR-164 in Naranjito Calle Canal in Cataño Tolled in Bayamón. PR-5 exists into two segments due to an unconstructed portion in Bayamón.
  PR-5 PR-2 in Aguadilla PR-2 in Aguadilla Renumbered to PR-107 and PR-110
  PR-6 PR-5 in Bayamón PR-2 in Bayamón
  PR-8 PR-17 in San Juan Near PR-3 in Carolina Formerly PR-4
  PR-9 4.52[12] 7.27 PR-2 / PR-52 in Ponce PR-10 in Ponce PR-9 currently exists in two portions, as the portion between PR-123 and PR-500 is actually under construction.
  PR-10 42.42[13] 68.27 PR-5506 in Ponce PR-2 in Arecibo PR-10 exists into two segments due to a still-under-construction portion between Adjuntas and Utuado.
  PR-12 3.28[14] 5.28 La Guancha in Ponce PR-14 in Ponce
  PR-14 PR-123 in Ponce PR-1 in Cayey Carretera Central
  PR-14R PR-123 in Ponce PR-14 in Ponce
  PR-15 PR-3 in Guayama PR-14 in Cayey
  PR-16 PR-1 in San Juan PR-1 / PR-26 in San Juan
  PR-17 PR-19 in San Juan PR-26 in Carolina Tolled in Teodoro Moscoso Bridge.
  PR-18 3.78[14] 6.08 PR-1 / PR-52 in San Juan PR-22 in San Juan
  PR-19 PR-20 in San Juan PR-2 in Guaynabo PR-19 is the main avenue in San Patricio, Guaynabo.
  PR-20 6.03[14] 9.70 PR-1 in Guaynabo PR-2 in Guaynabo Tolled
  PR-21 PR-20 in San Juan PR-1 / PR-176 in San Juan
  PR-22 52.01[14] 83.70 PR-2 in Hatillo PR-26 in San Juan 01969-01-011969[15] current Tolled
  PR-23 PR-2 / PR-165 in Guaynabo PR-27 in San Juan
  PR-24 PR-165 in Guaynabo PR-888 in Cataño
  PR-25 PR-3 in San Juan Calle Recinto Sur in San Juan
  PR-25R PR-1 in San Juan PR-25 in San Juan
  PR-26 9.63[14] 15.50 PR-1 in San Juan PR-3 / PR-66 in Carolina
  PR-27 PR-3 in San Juan PR-36 in San Juan
  PR-28 PR-5 in Bayamón PR-2 in Guaynabo
  PR-29 PR-2 in Bayamón PR-5 in Bayamón
  PR-30 19.08[14] 30.71 PR-1 in Caguas PR-53 in Humacao
  PR-31 PR-30 / PR-9913 in Juncos PR-3 in Naguabo
  PR-32 PR-172 in Caguas PR-1 in Caguas
  PR-33 Bulevar Cristóbal Colón in Caguas PR-1 / PR-189 in Caguas
  PR-34 PR-32 in Caguas PR-196 in Caguas
  PR-35 PR-1 in San Juan PR-16 in San Juan
  PR-36 PR-35 in San Juan PR-27 in San Juan
  PR-37 PR-25 in San Juan PR-187 in Carolina
  PR-38 Calle Recinto Sur in San Juan PR-25 in San Juan
  PR-39 PR-1 in San Juan PR-25 in San Juan
  PR-40 PR-25 in San Juan PR-27 in San Juan
  PR-41 PR-17 in San Juan PR-25 in San Juan
  PR-42 Calle Lafayette in San Juan PR-39 in San Juan
  PR-47 Calle Ferrocarril in San Juan PR-3 in San Juan
  PR-52 67.30[14] 108.31 PR-2 / PR-9 in Ponce PR-1 / PR-18 in San Juan 01968-01-011968[15] current Tolled
  PR-53 PR-52 in Salinas PR-3 / PR-194 in Fajardo 01988-01-011988[15] current Tolled. PR-53 exists into four portions due to an unconstructed segments between Guayama and Yabucoa.
  PR-54 PR-53 / PR-7711 in Guayama PR-3 / PR-748 in Guayama
  PR-60 2.21[14] 3.56 PR-30 in Humacao PR-3 in Humacao
  PR-63 PR-102 in Mayagüez PR-2 in Mayagüez
  PR-64 PR-102 / PR-3342 in Mayagüez PR-2 / PR-342 in Mayagüez
  PR-65 PR-2R in Mayagüez PR-106 in Mayagüez
  PR-66 PR-3 / PR-26 in Carolina PR-3 / PR-187 in Río Grande Tolled
  •       Former

Secondary highwaysEdit

Secondary roads are numbered in the 100 to 299 range. Unlike primary highways, which are numbered randomly throughout the island, secondary highways generally follow a grid pattern. They begin from the southwest portion of the island with PR-100 and increase in number as you progress in a northeasterly fashion. PR-100 is located in the southwestern town of Cabo Rojo, whilst PR-198 is in Juncos, Las Piedras and Humacao in the eastern part of Puerto Rico. The highest secondary highway number assigned so far (February 2014) is 252 (PR-252), located in the northeastern municipality-island of Culebra. A few roads “violate” this grid order; for example, PR-199 lies in Guaynabo and San Juan.

Number Length (mi) Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
  PR-100 PR-301 in Cabo Rojo PR-2 in Hormigueros
  PR-101 PR-307 in Cabo Rojo PR-102 in San Germán
  PR-102 PR-104 in Mayagüez PR-120 / PR-121 in Sabana Grande
  PR-103 PR-101 in Cabo Rojo PR-2 in Hormigueros
  PR-104 PR-2 in Mayagüez PR-2 in Mayagüez
  PR-105 PR-2R in Mayagüez PR-128 in Maricao Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-106 PR-2R in Mayagüez PR-120 in Las Marías Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-107 PR-2 in Aguadilla Ramey Air Force Base in Aguadilla
  PR-108 PR-105 in Mayagüez PR-109 in Añasco
  PR-109 PR-2 in Añasco PR-119 in San Sebastián
  PR-110 PR-2 in Añasco Ramey Air Force Base in Aguadilla
  PR-110R PR-110 in Moca PR-110 in Moca
  PR-110R PR-110 in Aguadilla Ramey Air Force Base in Aguadilla Renumbered to PR-4010
  PR-111 PR-2 in Aguadilla PR-140 in Utuado
  PR-111R PR-111 in Aguadilla PR-111 in Aguadilla Renumbered to PR-1107P
  PR-111R PR-125 in San Sebastián PR-111 in San Sebastián Renumbered to PR-125
  PR-111R PR-111 in Lares PR-111 in Lares Renumbered to PR-1111
  PR-111R PR-111 in Utuado PR-111 in Utuado Renumbered to PR-6111
  PR-112 PR-125 in Moca PR-113 in Isabela
  PR-113 PR-112 in Isabela PR-119 in Camuy
  PR-114 PR-2 / PR-2R in Mayagüez PR-102 in San Germán
  PR-115 PR-2 / PR-109 in Añasco PR-111 in Aguadilla
  PR-115R PR-417 in Aguada PR-115 in Aguada Renumbered to PR-4415
  PR-116 PR-101 in Lajas PR-2 in Guánica
  PR-116R PR-116 in Guánica PR-116 in Guánica Renumbered to PR-4116
  PR-116R PR-116 in Guánica PR-121 in Yauco Renumbered to PR-1116
  PR-117 PR-116 in Lajas PR-121 in Sabana Grande
  PR-118 PR-117 in Lajas PR-102 in San Germán
  PR-119 PR-2 in San Germán PR-2 in Hatillo Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-120 PR-102 / PR-121 in Sabana Grande PR-119 / PR-124 in Las Marías Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-121 PR-102 / PR-120 in Sabana Grande PR-127 / PR-128 in Yauco
  PR-122 PR-116 in Lajas PR-2 in San Germán PR-122 exists into two segments due to a still-under-construction portion between Lajas and San Germán.
  PR-123 PR-12 in Ponce PR-10 in Arecibo
  PR-124 PR-119 / PR-120 in Las Marías PR-111 in Lares
  PR-125 PR-111 in Aguadilla PR-111 in San Sebastián Formerly PR-111
  PR-125R PR-125 in San Sebastián PR-109 in San Sebastián
  PR-127 PR-121 / PR-128 in Yauco PR-2 in Peñuelas
  PR-128 PR-2 in Yauco PR-111 in Lares Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-129 PR-135 in Adjuntas PR-2 in Arecibo
  PR-130 PR-129 in Hatillo PR-119 in Hatillo
  PR-131 Guilarte Forest in Adjuntas PR-135 in Adjuntas Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-132 PR-2 / PR-136 in Guayanilla PR-123 in Ponce
  PR-133 PR-123 in Ponce PR-1 / PR-2 in Ponce
  PR-134 PR-111 in Lares PR-129 in Hatillo
  PR-135 PR-128 in Lares PR-123 in Adjuntas Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-136 PR-127 in Guayanilla PR-2 / PR-132 in Guayanilla
  PR-137 PR-155 in Morovis PR-2 in Vega Baja
  PR-138 PR-14 / PR-153 in Coamo PR-155 in Coamo
  PR-139 PR-10 in Ponce PR-143 in Ponce
  PR-139R PR-139 in Ponce Parque Luis A. "Wito" Morales in Ponce
  PR-140 PR-143 in Jayuya PR-2 in Barceloneta
  PR-141 PR-144 in Jayuya PR-140 in Utuado
  PR-142 5.10[16] 8.21 PR-159 in Corozal PR-2 in Dorado
  PR-143 PR-123 in Adjuntas PR-162 in Barranquitas Ruta Panorámica
  PR-144 PR-140 in Jayuya PR-149 in Ciales
  PR-145 PR-146 / PR-149 in Ciales PR-155 in Morovis
  PR-146 PR-123 in Arecibo PR-145 / PR-149 in Ciales
  PR-147 PR-164 in Naranjito PR-164 in Naranjito Became part of PR-5
  PR-148 PR-164 / PR-167 in Naranjito PR-5 / PR-826 in Naranjito
  PR-149 PR-1 in Juana Díaz PR-22 in Manatí
  PR-149R PR-149 in Villalba PR-149 in Villalba
  PR-150 PR-149 in Villalba PR-14 in Coamo
  PR-151 PR-150 in Villalba PR-143 in Villalba
  PR-152 PR-156 in Barranquitas PR-164 in Naranjito
  PR-152R PR-143 in Barranquitas PR-152 in Barranquitas
  PR-153 PR-1 in Santa Isabel PR-14 / PR-138 in Coamo
  PR-154 PR-153 in Coamo Campamento Santiago in Salinas
  PR-155 PR-14 in Coamo PR-2 in Vega Baja
  PR-156 PR-155 in Orocovis PR-1 in Caguas
  PR-157 PR-149 in Ciales PR-155 in Orocovis
  PR-158 PR-52 in Cayey PR-1 in Cayey proposed[17]
  PR-158 PR-1 in Juana Díaz Fort Allen in Juana Díaz Now Calle 158
  PR-159 PR-155 in Morovis PR-165 in Toa Alta
  PR-160 PR-159 in Morovis PR-2 in Vega Baja
  PR-161 PR-1 in Santa Isabel PR-1 in Santa Isabel
  PR-162 PR-1 in Aibonito PR-156 in Barranquitas
  PR-163 PR-500 in Ponce PR-2 in Ponce
  PR-164 PR-159 in Corozal PR-167 in Naranjito
  PR-165 PR-164 in Naranjito PR-2 / PR-23 in Guaynabo
  PR-165R PR-165 in Toa Alta PR-165 in Toa Alta
  PR-166 PR-102 in San Germán PR-122 in San Germán
  PR-167 PR-156 in Comerío PR-165 in Toa Baja
  PR-168 PR-2 in Bayamón Puerto Rico National Cemetery in Bayamón
  PR-169 PR-1 in Guaynabo PR-20 in Guaynabo
  PR-170 PR-1 in Cayey PR-14 in Cayey
  PR-171 PR-14 in Cayey PR-172 in Cidra
  PR-172 PR-156 in Comerío PR-1 in Caguas
  PR-173 PR-14 in Aibonito PR-1 in Guaynabo
  PR-174 PR-156 in Aguas Buenas PR-5 in Bayamón
  PR-175 PR-1 in Caguas PR-181 in Trujillo Alto
  PR-176 PR-175 in Trujillo Alto PR-1 / PR-21 in San Juan
  PR-177 PR-174 in Bayamón PR-176 in San Juan
  PR-178 PR-3 in Arroyo PR-3 in Arroyo
  PR-179 PR-15 in Guayama PR-184 in Cayey Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-180 PR-701 in Salinas PR-1 in Salinas
  PR-181 PR-3 in Patillas PR-17 in San Juan
  PR-182 PR-181 in Yabucoa PR-3 in Yabucoa Ruta Panorámica
  PR-183 PR-1 in Caguas PR-198 in Las Piedras
  PR-184 PR-3 in Patillas PR-1 in Cidra Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-185 PR-30 / PR-189 in Juncos PR-9959 in Canóvanas
  PR-186 PR-185 in Canóvanas PR-3 in Río Grande
  PR-187 PR-26 in Carolina PR-3 in Río Grande
  PR-187R PR-3 in Río Grande PR-187 in Río Grande
  PR-188 PR-66 in Canóvanas PR-187 in Loíza
  PR-189 PR-1 in Caguas PR-9913 in Juncos
  PR-190 PR-3 in Carolina PR-26 in Carolina
  PR-191 PR-31 in Naguabo PR-3 in Río Grande PR-191 exists into two segments in El Yunque National Forest.
  PR-192 PR-3 in Naguabo PR-31 in Naguabo
  PR-193 PR-3 in Luquillo PR-3 in Luquillo
  PR-194 PR-3 / PR-53 in Fajardo PR-3 in Fajardo
  PR-195 PR-3 in Fajardo Port of Fajardo
  PR-196 PR-156 in Caguas PR-1 in Caguas
  PR-198 PR-31 in Juncos PR-3 in Humacao
  PR-198R PR-198 in Humacao PR-198 in Humacao
  PR-199 Urbanización Portobello in Toa Alta PR-181 in Trujillo Alto PR-199 exists into two segments due to an unconstructed portion between Bayamón and Guaynabo.
  PR-200 3.91[18] 6.29 PR-994 in Vieques Barrio Puerto Diablo in Vieques
  PR-200R 0.93[18] 1.50 PR-200 in Vieques PR-200 in Vieques
  PR-201 4.47[18] 7.19 Barrio Llave in Vieques PR-200 in Vieques
  PR-203 PR-183 in San Lorenzo PR-30 in Gurabo
  PR-204 PR-183 in Las Piedras PR-198 in Las Piedras
  PR-204 PR-2 in Barceloneta PR-140 in Barceloneta Renumbered to PR-140
  PR-205 PR-31 in Naguabo PR-53 in Naguabo
  PR-206 PR-1 in Cayey PR-14 in Cayey
  PR-208 PR-156 in Aguas Buenas PR-156 in Aguas Buenas proposed[19]
  PR-212 PR-2 in Isabela PR-4472 in Isabela Formerly portion of PR-4494 extension
  PR-238 PR-153 in Coamo PR-14 in Coamo Formerly portion of PR-138
  PR-250 5.47[20] 8.80 Port of Culebra Zoni Beach in Culebra Formerly PR-998[21]
  PR-251 1.74[20] 2.80 PR-250 in Culebra Flamenco Beach in Culebra Formerly PR-999[21]
  PR-252 PR-250 in Culebra Barrio Playa Sardinas I in Culebra
  PR-253 1.99[20] 3.20 Calle Punta Soldado in Culebra PR-250 in Culebra
  •       Former
  •       Future

Tertiary highwaysEdit

 
"For your safety" driving in Puerto Rico sign

Tertiary highways also follow a general grid. Towns which do not border the Atlantic Ocean or the Caribbean Sea, especially in the mountainous area, may overlap this grid, for example Ciales may have both highways in the 600-699 grid and the 500-599 grid, depending where they begin further north or further south. Generally along the areas where the highways are, the lower the number, the more south it is. Culebra is the only town in Puerto Rico that does not fall in any of the regions, for only PR-250 and PR-251 are the main routes. The entire immediate metropolitan area of San Juan with the exception of Caguas falls in the 800 region, while the entire east coast (north and south) east of San Juan, Caguas and Patillas fall in the 900 region. This is because the eastern portion of Puerto Rico has a southeastern coast which goes to the west from Humacao, which roughly defines where the Vieques Passage and the Caribbean Sea meet along the coast. Yabucoa is in the exact south-southeast area and lies in the 900 region, while Maunabo overlaps the 700's and 900's regions. Vieques, an offshore island-municipality, has some highways in the 900 order.

Some roads are numbered using four digits. For example, PR-5506. These are branches, or spurs, of tertiary roads by the same last three digit number. Thus, PR-5506 is a branch of PR-506. They are often dead end branches, and are common in the mountain regions of the main island. Sometimes they are loops branching off the main road and eventually connecting back to the same main tertiary road. The “fourth” digit is generally a repeat of the first digit of the main tertiary road in question. Thus, a branch of PR-301 would be signed PR-3301, with the added 3 prefixing the number of the main tertiary road associated with the spur, 301, because 3 is the first digit of the main road. When the road has more than one distinct spur, an additional unrelated digit is used (example, PR-4301).

Number Length (mi) Length (km) Southern or western terminus Northern or eastern terminus Formed Removed Notes
  PR-301 Los Morrillos Light in Cabo Rojo PR-101 in Cabo Rojo
  PR-339 PR-105 in Mayagüez PR-119 in Mayagüez Ruta Panorámica
  PR-344 PR-345 in Hormigueros PR-348 in Mayagüez
  PR-365 PR-368 in Sabana Grande PR-105 in Maricao Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-366 PR-120 in Sabana Grande PR-365 in Maricao Ruta Panorámica
  PR-385 PR-127 in Peñuelas PR-132 in Peñuelas
  PR-413 PR-115 in Rincón PR-115 in Rincón
  PR-500 Barrio Canas in Ponce PR-132 in Ponce
  PR-501 PR-123 in Ponce Barrio Marueño in Ponce
  PR-502 PR-132 in Ponce PR-501 in Ponce
  PR-503 PR-14R in Ponce PR-143 in Utuado
  PR-504 PR-503 in Ponce PR-505 in Ponce
  PR-505 PR-139 in Ponce PR-503 in Ponce
  PR-506 Barrio Coto Laurel in Ponce PR-14 in Ponce
  PR-510 PR-1 in Ponce PR-14 in Juana Díaz
  PR-511 PR-14 in Ponce Anón in Ponce
  PR-515 PR-123 in Ponce PR-10 in Ponce
  PR-516 Sector Santas Pascuas in Ponce PR-123 in Ponce
  PR-518 PR-131 in Adjuntas PR-123 in Adjuntas Ruta Panorámica
  PR-525 PR-135 in Adjuntas PR-131 in Adjuntas Ruta Panorámica
  PR-549 Barrio Canas in Ponce PR-132 in Ponce
  PR-568 PR-5155 in Orocovis PR-159 in Corozal
  PR-577 PR-143 in Ponce Cerro Maravilla in Ponce
  PR-578 PR-1 in Ponce PR-1 in Ponce
  PR-585 PR-123 in Ponce PR-2R in Ponce
  PR-588 PR-504 in Ponce Camino La Zarza in Ponce
  PR-591 PR-2 in Ponce PR-2 in Ponce
  PR-693 PR-690 in Vega Alta PR-2 / PR-165 in Dorado
  PR-715 Barrio Cercadillo in Cayey PR-1 in Cayey Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-722 PR-162 / PR-7718 in Aibonito PR-14 in Aibonito Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-723 PR-143 in Coamo PR-14 in Aibonito Ruta Panorámica
  PR-735 PR-1 in Cayey PR-1 in Cayey Carretera Central
  PR-741 PR-15 in Cayey Barrio Culebras Alto in Cayey Ruta Panorámica
  PR-742 PR-179 in Guayama PR-738 in Cayey Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-760 Punta Tuna Light in Maunabo PR-3 in Maunabo Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-798 PR-1 in Caguas PR-1 in San Juan Carretera Central
  PR-803 PR-152 / PR-802 in Naranjito PR-164 in Corozal
  PR-866 PR-2 in Toa Baja PR-167 in Toa Baja
  PR-873 PR-1 in San Juan PR-1 in San Juan Carretera Central
  PR-891 PR-159 in Corozal PR-159 in Corozal Formerly PR-159
  PR-901 PR-760 in Maunabo PR-182 in Yabucoa Ruta Panorámica
  PR-908 PR-3 in Yabucoa PR-3 in Humacao
  PR-939 PR-760 in Maunabo Barrio Quebrada Arenas in Maunabo Part of the Ruta Panorámica
  PR-998 5.47[21] 8.80 Port of Culebra Zoni Beach in Culebra Renumbered to PR-250
  PR-999 1.74[20] 2.80 PR-250 in Culebra Flamenco Beach in Culebra Renumbered to PR-251
  PR-1107 PR-2 / PR-111 in Aguadilla PR-107 in Aguadilla Formerly PR-111
  PR-1111 PR-111 in Lares PR-111 in Lares Formerly PR-111
  PR-1116 PR-116 in Guánica PR-121 in Yauco Formerly PR-116R
  PR-1150 PR-150 in Villalba PR-149R / PR-150 in Villalba
  PR-1181 PR-3 in Patillas PR-3 in Patillas
  PR-3101 PR-101 in Lajas PR-101 in Lajas
  PR-3108 PR-2 in Mayagüez PR-108 in Mayagüez
  PR-3116 PR-116 in Guánica PR-116 in Guánica Formerly PR-116
  PR-3131 PR-132 in Guayanilla Sector Malpaso in Peñuelas
  PR-3132 PR-132 in Peñuelas PR-132 in Peñuelas
  PR-3301 Calle Mariana Bracetti in Cabo Rojo PR-301 in Cabo Rojo
  PR-3342 PR-102 in Mayagüez PR-64 / PR-102 in Mayagüez
  PR-4010 PR-110 in Aguadilla Ramey Air Force Base in Aguadilla Formerly PR-110R
  PR-4110 PR-443 in Aguadilla PR-110 in Moca
  PR-4111 PR-111 in San Sebastián PR-111 in San Sebastián Formerly PR-111
  PR-4116 PR-116 in Guánica PR-116 in Guánica Formerly PR-116R
  PR-4119 PR-485 in Quebradillas PR-119 in Camuy Formerly PR-485
  PR-4128 PR-111 in Lares PR-128 in Lares
  PR-4415 PR-417 in Aguada PR-115 in Aguada Formerly PR-115R
  PR-5139 PR-14 in Ponce PR-139 / PR-139R in Ponce
  PR-5141 PR-144 in Jayuya PR-141 in Jayuya
  PR-5144 PR-141 in Jayuya PR-144 in Jayuya
  PR-5155 PR-155 in Orocovis PR-155 in Orocovis Formerly PR-155
  PR-5156 PR-155 in Orocovis PR-156 in Orocovis
  PR-5506 PR-1 in Ponce PR-10 in Ponce
  PR-5568 PR-568 in Corozal PR-159 / PR-647 in Corozal
  PR-6111 PR-111 in Utuado PR-111 in Utuado Formerly PR-111R
  PR-6140 PR-2 in Barceloneta PR-140 in Barceloneta Formerly PR-140
  PR-6165 PR-693 in Dorado PR-165 in Dorado
  PR-6685 PR-146 in Ciales PR-2 in Manatí Formerly PR-149
  PR-6693 PR-696 in Dorado PR-693 in Dorado
  PR-7014 PR-14 in Cayey Calle Enramada in Cayey
  PR-7156 PR-156 in Aguas Buenas PR-156 in Caguas Formerly PR-156
  PR-7167 PR-156 / PR-167 in Comerío La Plata River in Comerío Formerly PR-156
  PR-7173 Barrio Sumidero in Aguas Buenas PR-173 in Aguas Buenas
  PR-7718 PR-14 in Aibonito PR-162 / PR-722 in Aibonito Ruta Panorámica[22]
  PR-7722 PR-722 in Aibonito PR-1 in Cayey Ruta Panorámica
  PR-7737 PR-715 in Cayey PR-15 in Cayey Ruta Panorámica
  PR-7740 PR-184 in Patillas PR-181 in San Lorenzo Ruta Panorámica
  PR-7741 PR-741 in Cayey PR-742 in Guayama Ruta Panorámica
  PR-8176 PR-176 in San Juan PR-176 in San Juan
  PR-8177 PR-177 in Guaynabo PR-177 in Guaynabo
  PR-8834 PR-1 / PR-173 in Guaynabo PR-1 / PR-169 in Guaynabo Carretera Central
  PR-8838 PR-177 in San Juan PR-1 in San Juan Carretera Central
  PR-9030 PR-189 in Gurabo PR-933 in Gurabo
  PR-9185 PR-185 in Juncos PR-31 in Juncos
  PR-9189 PR-189 in Gurabo Barrio Rincón in Gurabo
  •       Former

InterstatesEdit

 
Map of Puerto Rico's Interstate Highways

There are no Interstate-signed highways in Puerto Rico, but there are roadways that have received up to 90% of their funding from the Interstate Highway System.[23] Still, at least as of 2007, none of such highways funded by the Interstate Highway program were planned or built to the standards of the Interstate Highway System.[24] As of March 2001, Puerto Rico had 410 km (250 mi) of such roadways.[25] As of 2001, there were three highways in Puerto Rico funded under the Interstate Highway Program.[26] For obvious reasons, these routes—as with Interstate Highways in Alaska and Interstate Highways in Hawaii—do not connect to the Interstate Highway System in the contiguous United States.

Unlike Interstate routes in Hawaii, Puerto Rico Interstate routes are unsigned. For administrative and funding purposes, the three routes have been designated as PRI-1, PRI-2 and PRI-3[26] and run along various combinations of Puerto Rico routes. They do not follow the even-and-odd-number rule used in mainland United States that indicates direction of travel. Per Section 103(c)(1)(B) (ii), Title 23, United States Code (23 U.S.C.) Puerto Rico is exempt from the design standards of Section 109(b).[23]

Puerto Rico's Interstate routes should not to be confused with Puerto Rico Routes PR-1, PR-2, and PR-3, which are other major highways in Puerto Rico.[27]

Route Component routes Length
mi[28]
Length
km
From To
  PRI-1   PR-52
  PR-18
71.08 114.39 PR-2 in Ponce PR-2 in San Juan (PR-22/PR-18 interchange)
  PRI-2   PR-2
  PR-22
138.13 222.30 PR-1 in Ponce PR-3 in San Juan (PR-1/PR-26 interchange)
  PRI-3   PR-53
  PR-3
  PR-66
  PR-26
65.27 105.04 PR-3 in Humacao PR-2 in San Juan (PR-1/PR-26/PR-66 interchange)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f Autoridad de Carreteras y Transportación (22 December 2004). "Guias para la Selección e Instalación de Rotulos de Orientacion (Suplemento al MUTCD 2003)" (PDF) (in Spanish). Departamento de Transportación y Obras Públicas. p. 1. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 November 2009. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  2. ^ a b Guías para la Selección e Instalación de Rótulos de Orientación (Suplemento al MUTCD 2009). Autoridad de Carreteras. 24 July 2015. pp. 1-2. Accessed 31 March 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e Autoridad de Carreteras y Transportación Estándares de Ingeniería. "Chapter i: General Design Criteria". Manual de Diseño (PDF) (in Spanish). Departamento de Transportación y Obras Públicas. Sections 1-03.01, pp. 1-2. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 November 2009. Retrieved 5 January 2015.
  4. ^ "Municipal Ordinance Number 52, Series 2009-2010. Primera Hora" (PDF) (in Spanish). Autonomous Municipality of Ponce. 28 April 2010. p. 59.
  5. ^ "Oficinas Regionales" (in Spanish). Departamento de Transportación y Obras Públicas. Archived from the original on 6 September 2010. Retrieved 22 August 2010.
  6. ^ a b "ACT Propone Diseño de Mejoras Geometricas Para Agilizar el Transito en las Rampas de Acceso de la PR-52 Hacia y Desde Juana Diaz" (Press release) (in Spanish). Departamento de Transportación y Obras Públicas. 16 November 2010.
  7. ^ a b "Municipio de Ponce Repavimenta la PR-2". El Sur a la Vista. Ponce, Puerto Rico (in Spanish). 16 September 2011. Retrieved 19 September 2011.
  8. ^ a b ¿Sabes cómo identificar si una carretera es estatal o municipal? Carlos M. Contreras-Aponte, Secretary of the Puerto Rico Department of Transportation and Public Works (DTOP). Departamento de Transportación y Obras Publicas de Puerto Rico. Published 28 August 2017. (Video series name: DTOP en Ruta; Date of video: Unknown). Accessed 2 May 2019.
  9. ^ "AutoExpreso" (in Spanish). Department of Transportation and Public Works of Puerto Rico. Archived from the original on 23 December 2012. Retrieved 28 December 2012.
  10. ^ "Tarifas de Estaciones de Peaje" (in Spanish). Department of Transportation and Public Works of Puerto Rico. Retrieved 28 December 2012.
  11. ^ PR-2R, Ponce, Puerto Rico PR.Geoview.Info Accessed 3 May 2019.
  12. ^ Inauguran conector con la PR-10 del sur. Sandra Caquías Cruz. El Nuevo Dia. Guaynabo, Puerto Rico. 14 October 2000. Accessed 15 February 2018
  13. ^ Listado de Sistemas Viales: Muestra. Departamento de Transportación y Obras Publicas de Puerto Rico. 3 May 2019. Archived at WayBack Machine on 2011-02-06 at 05:23:03AM (6 February 2011). Accessed 3 May 2019.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h Guía de Carreteras Principales, Expresos y Autopistas. Gobierno de Puerto Rico. Departamento de Transportación y Obras Publicas. Accessed 3 May 2019.
  15. ^ a b c Historia. Departamento de Transportacion y Obras Publicas de Puerto Rico. Archived on 16 February 2009. Retrieved 28 April 2019.
  16. ^ "RESOLUCIÓN Para ordenar a la Comisión de Transportación, Infraestructura, y de Recreación y Deportes de la Cámara de Representantes de Puerto Rico, a realizar una investigación sobre las condiciones de la Carretera 142, la cual discurre por los municipios de Dorado, Toa Alta y Corozal, debido a los constantes accidentes automovilísticos en la zona que ponen en peligro la seguridad de los usuarios de dicha vía de rodaje" (PDF). House of Representatives of Puerto Rico (in Spanish). Retrieved 6 May 2019.
  17. ^ "Comunidades impugnarán Ciudadela de Cayey". Centro de Periodismo Investigativo (in Spanish). Retrieved 4 May 2019.
  18. ^ a b c "Plan Maestro para el Desarrollo Sustentable de Vieques" (PDF). PUERTO RICO Microjuris (in Spanish). 2004. p. 168-169. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  19. ^ "Ponencia del alcalde del municipio de Aguas Buenas, honorable Luis Arroyo Chiqués sobre la resolución del Senado 40 para investigación sobre la paralización del proyecto expreso número 156 que conduce de Caguas a Aguas Buenas" (PDF). Oficina de Servicios Legislativos (in Spanish). Retrieved 4 May 2019.
  20. ^ a b c d "Plan Maestro para el Desarrollo Sustentable de Culebra" (PDF). PUERTO RICO Microjuris (in Spanish). 2004. p. 142. Retrieved 4 May 2019.
  21. ^ a b c "Culebra, Memoria Núm. 75" (PDF). Puerto Rico Planning Board (in Spanish). 1955. Retrieved 6 June 2019.
  22. ^ Ley Núm. 62 del año 2016 (P. de la C. 2753): Para designar la Carretera Estatal PR-7718, parte de la “Ruta Panorámica Luis Muñoz Marín”, en el Barrio Pasto de Aibonito, Puerto Rico, como “Paseo Don Julio Francisco “Paco” Santos Vázquez”. Ley Num. 62 de 17 de junio de 2016. Camara de Representantes de Puerto Rico. LexJuris Puerto Rico. Accessed 2 May 2019.
  23. ^ a b National Highway System: Interstate Highway System: FHWA Route Log and Finder List: Interstate Funding. US Department of Transportation. National Highway Administration. Accessed 2 May 2019.
  24. ^ FHWA Route Log and Finder List: Additional Designations. Tony DeSimone. U.S. Federal Highway Administration. 22 March 2007. 2 May 2019.
  25. ^ "Section D: Puerto Rico Highways" (PDF). Latin America Trade and Transportation Study. Mississippi Department of Transportation. March 2001.
  26. ^ a b DeSimone, Tony (6 April 2011). "Table 3: Interstate Routes in Each of the 50 States, District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico". Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 4 July 2012.
  27. ^ "National Highway System - Puerto Rico Map" (PDF). U.S. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved 21 February 2019.
  28. ^ "Table 1: Main Routes of the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System Of Interstate and Defense Highways as of October 31, 2002". Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. 4 June 2012. Retrieved 4 July 2012.

External linksEdit