List of earthquakes in Mexico

This is a partial list of earthquakes in Mexico. This list considers every notable earthquake felt or with its epicenter within Mexico's current borders and maritime areas.

Map of earthquakes in Mexico from 1900 to 2022
Seismic hazard risk in Mexico
Location of M 8.0+ earthquakes in Mexico with year of occurrence

Geology

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Mexico lies within two seismically active earthquake zones. The Baja California peninsula lies near the boundary of the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate, while southern Mexico lies just north of the boundary between the North American Plate and the Cocos and Rivera tectonic plates. The Cocos Plate is subducting under the North American Plate at a rate of 67 mm (0.220 ft) per year, while the Pacific and Rivera plates are moving northwest relative to the North American Plate. Southern Mexico also contains numerous faults, which causes that section of the country to have high tectonic activity. Northeastern Mexico and the Yucatan Peninsula are not as seismically active as the area close to the boundary between the North American and Cocos plates, but destructive earthquakes can still occur in those areas.

Earthquakes

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Date Area Mag. MMI Deaths Injuries Total damage / notes Ref
2022-09-22 Michoacán 6.8 Mw VII 3 5 Aftershock
2022-09-19 Michoacán 7.6 Mw VIII 2 35 Severe damage [1]
2022-06-21 Jalisco 2.4 Mw Severe damage [2][3]
2022-03-03 Veracruz 5.7 Mw IV Minor damage [4][5]
2021-09-07 Guerrero 7.0 Mw VIII 13 23 Three missing, damage to 8,700 buildings
2020-06-23 Oaxaca 7.4 Mw IX 10 25
2018-02-16 Oaxaca 7.2 Mw VII 14 17 Most of casualties after a helicopter crash
2017-09-23 Oaxaca 6.1 Mw VII 6 7 7,000 displaced [6][7][8]
2017-09-19 Mexico City, Morelos, Puebla 7.1 Mw IX 370 6,011
2017-09-07 Chiapas, Oaxaca 8.2 Mw IX 98 300 Tsunami
2015-11-23 Guerrero 5.5 Mw IV 2 [9]
2014-07-07 Chiapas 6.9 Mw VII 5 12
2014-05-08 Guerrero 6.6 Mw VII
2014-04-18 Guerrero 7.2 Mw VII 1
2012-03-20 Guerrero, Oaxaca 7.4 Mw VIII 2 11
2011-12-10 Guerrero 6.5 Mw VII 3 10
2011-05-05 Guerrero 5.7 Mw VI
2010-06-30 Oaxaca 6.2 Mw 1
2010-04-04 Baja California 7.2 Mw VII 2–4 100–233 $1.15 billion
2009-04-27 Guerrero 5.8 Mw V 3 Four houses destroyed [10][11]
2003-01-22 Colima 7.5 Mw VIII 29 300 Severe / tsunami
1999-12-29 Guerrero 5.9 Mw V 1 Minor damage [12]
1999-09-30 Oaxaca 7.4 Mw VIII 35
1999-06-15 Puebla 7.0 Mw VIII 14 200 MXN $200,000,000 [13]
1997-01-11 Michoacán 7.2 Mw VIII 1 Damage at Arteaga [14]
1995-10-21 Chiapas 7.1 Mw VI
1995-10-09 Colima, Jalisco 8.0 Mw VIII 49–58 100 Tsunami
1995-09-14 Guerrero 7.4 Mw VII 3
1989-04-25 Guerrero 6.9 Mw VII 3 6–350 [15][16]
1985-09-19 Michoacán, Mexico City 8.0 Mw IX 5,000–45,000 30,000 Extreme / tsunami
1981-10-25 Michoacán 7.2 Mw VIII 3
1980-10-24 Oaxaca 7.2 Mw IX 65–300+ Many $5 million
1979-10-15 Baja California 6.4 Mw IX 91
1979-03-14 Guerrero 7.6 Mw VIII 5 35
1973-08-28 Puebla, Veracruz 7.1 ML VIII 539–1,000 Thousands Severe
1973-01-30 Colima 7.5 Ms 56 390 Moderate / non-destructive tsunami [17]
1968-08-02 Guerrero, Oaxaca 7.3 VII
1965-08-23 Oaxaca 7.5 Mw 6
1964-07-06 Guerrero 7.4 Ms IX 40
1959-08-26 Veracruz 6.4 Mw VIII 25 200 Severe
1957-07-28 Guerrero, Mexico City 7.9 Ms VII 54–160 Many Extreme / tsunami [18]
1941-04-15 Colima 7.6 Mw IX 90
1937-07-26 Puebla, Veracruz 7.3 Ms IX 34
1932-06-22 Colima 7.0 Mw VIII Tsunami
1932-06-18 Colima 7.8 Mw VIII Tsunami
1932-06-03 Jalisco 8.1 Mw X 400 Tsunami
1931-01-15 Oaxaca 7.8 Mw X 114
1920-01-03 Puebla, Veracruz 6.4 Ms X–XII 648–4,000 167 [19]
1912-11-19 State of Mexico 7.0 VIII 140 [20]
1911-12-16 Guerrero 7.6 IX
1911-06-07 Michoacán 7.6 IX 45
1909-07-30 Guerrero 7.6 IX
1907-04-15 Guerrero 7.7 VIII
1900-01-20 Colima 7.4 VII
1899-01-24 Guerrero 7.5 VII
1897-06-05 Oaxaca 7.4 VII
1894-11-02 Guerrero, Oaxaca 7.4 VIII
1892-02-24 Baja California 7.1–7.2 X 0
1890-12-02 Guerrero, Oaxaca 7.3 VII
1889-09-06 Guerrero 7.1 VI
1887-05-29 Guerrero 7.3 VIII
1887-05-03 Sonora 7.6 Mw 51
1882-07-19 Guerrero, Oaxaca 7.5 IX
1879-05-17 Puebla 7.1 VIII
1875-03-09 Colima, Jalisco 7.4 VII
1875-02-11 Jalisco 7.5 VIII
1874-03-16 Guerrero 7.3 VII
1872-03-27 Oaxaca 7.4 VI
1870-05-11 Oaxaca 7.8 IX
1864-10-03 Puebla, Veracruz 7.3 VIII
1858-06-19 Michoacán 7.5 IX "Temblor de Santa Juliana" [21]
1854-05-05 Oaxaca 7.7 VIII
1852-12-04 Acapulco 7.8
1845-04-07 Guerrero 7.9 Ms "Temblor de Santa Teresa" [22][21]
1852-11-29 Baja California 6.5 MLa IX [23]
1845-03-09 Oaxaca 7.5 VII
1837-11-22 Jalisco 7.7 IX
1835-01-06 State of Mexico VII?
1820-05-04 Guerrero 7.6 VII
1818-05-31 Colima, Michoacán 7.7 VIII
1806-03-25 Colima, Michoacán 7.5 Ms [22]
1800-03-08 Central, Eastern, and Southeastern VII
1787-03-28 Guerrero, Oaxaca, Mexico City 8.6 Mw Severe / tsunami
1776-04-21 Mexico City, Southern VIII
Stover & Coffman 1993 uses various seismic scales. MLa is a local magnitude that is equivalent to ML (Richter magnitude scale) and is used for events that occurred prior to the instrumental period. It is based on the area of perceptibility (as presented on isoseismal maps). Mw = moment magnitude scale and Ms = surface wave magnitude. The inclusion criteria for adding events are based on WikiProject Earthquakes' notability guideline that was developed for stand alone articles. The principles described are also applicable to lists. In summary, only damaging, injurious, or deadly events should be recorded.

See also

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Notes

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  1. ^ "M 7.6 - 37 km SE of Aquila, Mexico". 19 September 2022.
  2. ^ National Autonomous University of Mexico (1998), Earthquake Catalog (in Mexican Spanish), National Seismological Service, doi:10.21766/SSNMX/EC/MX
  3. ^ "Falla en Ciudad Guzmán deja 102 casas afectadas, 22 de ellas no habitables". NotiespacioPV (in Spanish). 22 June 2022. Retrieved 23 June 2022.
  4. ^ "M 5.7 - Veracruz, Mexico". earthquake.usgs.gov.
  5. ^ "Reportan daños en escuela de Coatepec tras sismo". palabrasclaras.mx (in Spanish). 2 March 2022. Retrieved 4 March 2022.
  6. ^ "Suman cuatro muertos en Oaxaca por sismo de ayer sábado - Matutinazo" [There are four deaths in Oaxaca due to an earthquake on Saturday - Matutinazo]. Matutinazo (in Mexican Spanish). September 24, 2017. Retrieved September 24, 2017.
  7. ^ "Tras el sismo, fallecen dos mujeres por infarto en la CDMX" [After the earthquake, two women died of heart attack in the CDMX]. Excélsior (in Spanish). September 23, 2017. Retrieved September 23, 2017.
  8. ^ "Oaxaca: Damnificadas del sismo del 23 de septiembre de 2017 tejen muñecas "con causa" | Fotos" [Oaxaca: Victims of the earthquake of September 23, 2017 weave dolls "with a cause" | Photos]. La Neta Neta! (in Mexican Spanish). September 23, 2019. Retrieved April 17, 2022.
  9. ^ "El pequeño terremoto de 5,6 que dejó dos muertos en México" [The small earthquake of 5.6 that left two dead in Mexico]. BBC (in Spanish). November 24, 2015. Retrieved April 17, 2022.
  10. ^ "Sismo deja una persona muerta en Guerrero" [Earthquake leaves a person dead in Guerrero]. El Universal (in Spanish). April 27, 2009. Archived from the original on May 24, 2012. Retrieved April 17, 2022.
  11. ^ "Mexico: Earthquake". Deseret News. April 28, 2009. Archived from the original on October 16, 2012. Retrieved April 17, 2022.
  12. ^ "M 5.9 - 19 km WSW of Guayameo, Mexico". earthquake.usgs.gov.
  13. ^ "Puebla, a 18 años del terremoto de 1999" [Puebla, 18 years after the earthquake of 1999]. El Popular (in Spanish). June 15, 2016. Archived from the original on April 18, 2019. Retrieved November 19, 2019.
  14. ^ USGS. "M 7.2 - Michoacan, Mexico". United States Geological Survey.
  15. ^ ANSS. "Guerrero 1989 : M 6.9 - Guerrero, Mexico". Comprehensive Catalog. U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved January 27, 2021.
  16. ^ USGS (4 September 2009), PAGER-CAT Earthquake Catalog, Version 2008_06.1, United States Geological Survey
  17. ^ NGDC 1972
  18. ^ NGDC 1972
  19. ^ NGDC 1972
  20. ^ Zúñiga, F.R.; Pacheco, J.F.; Guzmán-Speziale, M.; Aguirre-Dı́az, G.J.; Espı́ndola, V.H.; Nava, E. (2003). "The Sanfandila earthquake sequence of 1998, Queretaro, Mexico: activation of an undocumented fault in the northern edge of central Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt". Tectonophysics. 361 (3–4): 229–238. Bibcode:2003Tectp.361..229Z. doi:10.1016/S0040-1951(02)00606-6.
  21. ^ a b "19th century earthquakes in Mexico: three cases, three comparative studies" by América Molina del Villar
  22. ^ a b Singh, S. K.; Astiz, L.; Havskov, J. (1981), "Seismic gaps and recurrence periods of large earthquakes along the Mexican subduction zone: A reexamination", Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 71 (3), Seismological Society of America: 828, Bibcode:1981BuSSA..71..827S, doi:10.1785/BSSA0710030827
  23. ^ Stover, C. W.; Coffman, J. L. (1993), Seismicity of the United States, 1568–1989 (Revised), U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1527, United States Government Printing Office, pp. 72, 101

References

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