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List of crossings of the Hackensack River

Bridges at the lower end of the Hackensack River in a historic photo. The Lower Hack Lift is just upstream of the clustered Wittpenn, Harsimus Branch Lift, and PATH Lift (foreground), collectively known as the Triple Bridges[1][2] or Tri Hack.[3] They are part of the Hackensack River Vertical Lift Bridges Historic District[4] (NJSHPO #3971[5]).

The Hackensack River courses southward for approximately 50 miles (80 km)[6] through Rockland County in New York and Bergen and Hudson counties in northeastern New Jersey, forming the border of the latter two for part of its length. Its source, as identified by the U.S. Geological Survey (Hydrological code 02030103901),[7] is in New City, New York. The river empties into Newark Bay between Kearny Point (South Kearny) and Droyer's Point (Jersey City).

The area was settled by Bergen Dutch who established regular water crossings at Douwe's Ferry[8] and Little Ferry.[9] The first bridge crossing of the Hackensack was at Demarest Landing (now Old Bridge Road), built in 1724, which was replaced by that at New Bridge Landing in 1745.[10] The first railroad crossing was completed by the NJRR in 1834, and was soon followed by many others. By the early 1900s conflicts between rail and maritime traffic led to calls for changes in regulations giving priority to trains.[11]

At one time, Van Buskirk Island, created in 1804, was the head of navigation, but diminished freshwater flow in the Hackensack has been altered by construction of dams,[12] namely the Oradell (1923), the DeForest (1952), and the Tappan (1972).[13] The river is now tidally influenced to the island.[14] The Hackensack has only been channelized to Milepoint 3.5 at the Riverbend in Hudson County.[12][15] The accumulation of silt has diminished the depth, and thus navigability, of the Lower Hackensack.[16] which at one time was a major waterway for towboats and river barges in the Port of New York and New Jersey.[17]

Since 1999, the bridge at Milepoint 16.3 is the most upstream bridge required by the Code of Federal Regulations to open on request,[18] though no requests have made since 1994.[19] The Lower Hackensack remains partially in use for commercial maritime traffic, notably for coal deliveries to the Hudson Generating Station.[20] and sewage sludge for treatment at a facility on the bay.[21] Downstream of the power plant, vehicular moveable bridges (at MP 1.8 and MP 3.1) are required at all times to open on demand.[22] and rail crossings to open on 1-hour notice.[18] As of 2012 there were plans to replace the Wittpenn Bridge, a vehicular bridge at MP 3.1, with a new vertical lift bridge[23] and the Portal Bridge, a rail swing bridge at MP 5.0, with a through arch bridge.[24]

The New Jersey Turnpike in the Meadowlands

CrossingsEdit

Mile Crossing Image Carried/Carries Location Coordinates Notes
HD Draw (defunct)   Newark and New York Railroad (CNJ) Jersey City & Kearny Point 40°43′07″N 74°06′14″W / 40.718709°N 74.103985°W / 40.718709; -74.103985 (HD Draw)
1.7 Newark Plank Road (defunct)   PS 40°43′36″N 74°05′57″W / 40.7268°N 74.0992°W / 40.7268; -74.0992 (Newark Plank Road)
1.8 Lincoln Highway Hackensack River Bridge

(Shawn Carson and Robert Nguyen Memorial Bridge)

    
  U.S. Route 1-9 Truck
milepoint 1.72
Lincoln Highway
East Coast Greenway
40°43′38″N 74°05′55″W / 40.727324°N 74.098728°W / 40.727324; -74.098728 (Lincoln Highway) [25]
Pulaski Skyway     U.S. Route 1/9 40°44′06″N 74°05′42″W / 40.735064°N 74.09493°W / 40.735064; -74.09493 (Pulaski Skyway)
PATH Lift Bridge   PRR and H&M
PATH
Jersey City & Kearny Meadows 40°44′24″N 74°04′59″W / 40.740108°N 74.083048°W / 40.740108; -74.083048 (PATH Lift Bridge)
Harsimus Branch Lift
aka Hack Freight Railroad Bridge
[26]
  PRR
Conrail (North Jersey Shared Assets)

NS
CSX

40°44′26″N 74°04′55″W / 40.740475°N 74.082034°W / 40.740475; -74.082034 (Harsimus Branch Lift)
3.1 Wittpenn Bridge   original alignment of the Newark Turnpike
  NJ 7
40°44′25″N 74°04′52″W / 40.740313°N 74.081138°W / 40.740313; -74.081138 (Wittpenn Bridge)
Wittpenn Bridge Replacement
(under construction)
  40°44′28″N 74°04′53″W / 40.741064°N 74.081266°W / 40.741064; -74.081266 (Wittpenn Bridge Replacement)
New Jersey Railroad
(defunct)
  PRR 40°44′28″N 74°04′53″W / 40.741064°N 74.081266°W / 40.741064; -74.081266 (New Jersey Railroad)
3.4 Lower Hack Lift   DL&W
Morris and Essex Lines (NJT)
Riverbend 40°44′36″N 74°04′37″W / 40.7432°N 74.0770°W / 40.7432; -74.0770 (Lower Hack Lift)
5.0 Portal Bridge   PRR
Northeast Corridor
Amtrak and NJT
Secaucus Junction & Kearny Meadows 40°45′13″N 74°05′41″W / 40.75361°N 74.09472°W / 40.75361; -74.09472 (Portal Bridge)
Portal Bridge South (planned) Gateway Project
Portal Bridge North (planned) Gateway Project
Lewandowski Hackensack River Bridge   New Jersey Turnpike (Eastern Spur)
  Interstate 95
Snake Hill & Kearny Meadows 40°45′36″N 74°05′41″W / 40.760098°N 74.094594°W / 40.760098; -74.094594 (Lewandowski Hackensack River Bridge)
DB Draw (unused)   New York and Greenwood Lake Railroad (Erie)
Boonton Line (NJT)
NS
40°45′30″N 74°05′36″W / 40.75831°N 74.093355°W / 40.75831; -74.093355 (DB Draw)
6.9 Upper Hack Lift   DL&W Boonton Line (1959-1963)
Erie/NJ Transit Main Line (NJT)
Port Jervis Line (MNCR)
MP 4.95
Harmon Cove & Kingsland 40°46′41″N 74°05′24″W / 40.778015°N 74.089906°W / 40.778015; -74.089906 (Upper Hack Lift / Former Lackawanna Swing Bridge) NJT #129
Lackawanna Swing Bridge (defunct)   DL&W
7.7 HX Draw
aka The Jacknife
  Bergen County Line (NJT)
Pascack Valley Line (NJT)
Meadowlands Rail Line (NJT)
Port Jervis Line (MNCR)
former Erie Main LineMP 5.48
Harmon Cove & Meadowlands Sports Complex 40°47′17″N 74°04′55″W / 40.788078°N 74.081869°W / 40.788078; -74.081869 (HX Draw) NJT #
Route 3 East     NJ 3 Secaucus & Meadowlands Sports Complex 40°47′55″N 74°04′08″W / 40.798745°N 74.068978°W / 40.798745; -74.068978 (Route 3 East)
Route 3 West
(Medgar Evers Bridge)
    NJ 3 40°48′02″N 74°04′01″W / 40.800678°N 74.067058°W / 40.800678; -74.067058 (Route 3 West)
Paterson Plank Road (defunct)   Jersey City, Hoboken and Rutherford Electric Railway
Public Service
Secaucus North End &
Meadowlands Sports Complex
40°48′21″N 74°03′39″W / 40.80586°N 74.0608°W / 40.80586; -74.0608 (Paterson Plank Road)
New Jersey Turnpike (Western Spur)     Interstate 95 Carlstadt & Ridgefield Park 40°49′23″N 74°02′04″W / 40.823179°N 74.034358°W / 40.823179; -74.034358 (New Jersey Turnpike (Western Spur))
Bergen Turnpike
(aka Hackensack Plank Road) (defunct)
Public Service
  CR 124
Ridgefield Park & Little Ferry 40°50′55″N 74°01′49″W / 40.8485°N 74.0303°W / 40.8485; -74.0303 (Bergen Turnpike)
14.0 Route 46 Hackensack River Bridge
(aka S46 Bridge & Winant Avenue Bridge)
    U.S. Route 46 40°51′04″N 74°01′45″W / 40.8511°N 74.0293°W / 40.8511; -74.0293 (Route 46 Hackensack River Bridge)
Interstate 80     Interstate 80 Bogota & Hackensack 40°52′02″N 74°02′08″W / 40.867104°N 74.035601°W / 40.867104; -74.035601 (Interstate 80)
16.3 Court Street Bridge
(Harold J. Dillard Memorial Bridge)
  Court Street - West Fort Lee Road 40°52′44″N 74°02′22″W / 40.8790°N 74.0395°W / 40.8790; -74.0395 (Court Street Bridge)
16.2 New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway   NYS&W[27] 40°52′52″N 74°02′15″W / 40.881163°N 74.037393°W / 40.881163; -74.037393 (New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway)
Midtown Bridge
aka Salem Street Bridge
(Ryan Memorial Bridge)[28]
    West Main Street
originally carried PS and predecessor streetcars lines
40°52′57″N 74°02′10″W / 40.882509°N 74.036116°W / 40.882509; -74.036116 (Midtown Bridge)
Anderson Street Bridge
aka Cedar Lane Bridge
  East Anderson Street - Cedar Lane Teaneck & Hackensack 40°53′31″N 74°02′11″W / 40.891975°N 74.036288°W / 40.891975; -74.036288 (Cedar Lane Bridge)
Fairleigh Dickinson University Footbridge   40°53′56″N 74°01′54″W / 40.898812°N 74.031638°W / 40.898812; -74.031638 (Fairleigh Dickinson University Footbridge)
Route 4     NJ 4 40°54′09″N 74°01′48″W / 40.902582°N 74.030021°W / 40.902582; -74.030021 (Route 4)
Swing Bridge at New Bridge Landing
Built 1889. to replace earlier 1744 sliding drawbridge.

 

Main Street (no cars) New Bridge Landing
River Edge, Teaneck, New Milford
40°54′46″N 74°01′56″W / 40.912816°N 74.032221°W / 40.912816; -74.032221 (Swing Bridge at New Bridge Landing)
New Bridge Road   New Milford & River Edge 40°54′54″N 74°01′50″W / 40.914907°N 74.030521°W / 40.914907; -74.030521 (New Bridge Road)
River Edge Avenue Bridge   40°56′06″N 74°01′43″W / 40.934914°N 74.028541°W / 40.934914; -74.028541 (River Edge Avenue Bridge)
New Milford Avenue Bridge
(Merschrod Memorial Bridge)
  New Milford 40°56′46″N 74°01′35″W / 40.946163°N 74.026505°W / 40.946163; -74.026505 (New Milford Avenue Bridge)
Elm Street Bridge
part of the New Milford Plant of the Hackensack Water Company
  Phoenix column Pratt pony truss New Milford & Oradell 40°56′49″N 74°1′30″W / 40.94694°N 74.02500°W / 40.94694; -74.02500 [29][30][31]
Oradell Avenue Bridge   Oradell 40°57′14″N 74°01′44″W / 40.953909°N 74.028933°W / 40.953909; -74.028933 (Oradell Avenue Bridge)
Oradell Reservoir Dam Oradell 40°57′22″N 74°01′44″W / 40.956129°N 74.029001°W / 40.956129; -74.029001 (Oradell Reservoir Dam)
Old Hook Road Bridge   CR 502 Emerson, Harrington Park & Closter 40°58′37″N 73°59′03″W / 40.976889°N 73.984235°W / 40.976889; -73.984235 (Old Hook Road Bridge)
Harriot Avenue Bridge River Vale & Harrington Park 40°59′06″N 73°59′30″W / 40.984976°N 73.991579°W / 40.984976; -73.991579 (Harriot Avenue Bridge)
Westwood Avenue Bridge River Vale & Old Tappan
New Jersey
40°59′57″N 73°59′21″W / 40.999274°N 73.989304°W / 40.999274; -73.989304 (Westwood Avenue Bridge)
Old Tappan Road 41°00′44″N 74°00′31″W / 41.012293°N 74.008504°W / 41.012293; -74.008504 (Old Tappan Road)
Lake Tappan Dam footbridge 41°01′06″N 74°00′04″W / 41.0183°N 74.0011°W / 41.0183; -74.0011 (Lake Tappan Dam)
Poplar Road – Washington Avenue 41°01′07″N 73°59′59″W / 41.01855°N 73.99978°W / 41.01855; -73.99978 (Poplar Road / Washington Avenue)
Veterans Memorial Drive   CR 20 New York State
Pearl River
41°02′39″N 73°59′17″W / 41.044145°N 73.98807°W / 41.044145; -73.98807 (Veterans Memorial Drive)
Convent Road   CR 26 Pearl River & Blauvelt 41°03′16″N 73°58′56″W / 41.054534°N 73.982284°W / 41.054534; -73.982284 (Convent Road)
Blauvelt Road 41°03′38″N 73°59′09″W / 41.060537°N 73.985845°W / 41.060537; -73.985845 (Blauvelt Road)
Palisades Interstate Parkway   41°03′57″N 73°58′44″W / 41.065892°N 73.978937°W / 41.065892; -73.978937 (Palisades Interstate Parkway)
Fifth Avenue 41°04′13″N 73°58′32″W / 41.07024°N 73.97554°W / 41.07024; -73.97554 (Fifth Avenue)
Western Highway   CR 15 West Nyack 41°05′10″N 73°57′47″W / 41.086237°N 73.962923°W / 41.086237; -73.962923 (Western Highway)
River Subdivision (CSX) West Shore Railroad (NYC)
River Line (Conrail)
41°05′12″N 73°57′44″W / 41.086712°N 73.962341°W / 41.086712; -73.962341 (River Subdivision (CSX))
New York State Route 59   NY-59 41°05′40″N 73°57′40″W / 41.094388°N 73.961045°W / 41.094388; -73.961045 (New York State Route 59)
New York Thruway       West Nyack & Bardonia 41°06′03″N 73°57′56″W / 41.100925°N 73.965501°W / 41.100925; -73.965501 (New York Thruway)
Old Mill Road Bardonia 41°06′20″N 73°58′00″W / 41.105468°N 73.966711°W / 41.105468; -73.966711 (Old Mill Road)
Lake DeForest Dam 41°06′22″N 73°58′01″W / 41.10621°N 73.966806°W / 41.10621; -73.966806 (Lake Deforest Dam)
Congers Road Causeway   CR 80 across Lake DeForest New City & Congers 41°09′21″N 73°57′30″W / 41.1558°N 73.9584°W / 41.1558; -73.9584 (Congers Road)
Ridge Road   CR 23 New City 41°09′36″N 73°57′53″W / 41.1599°N 73.9648°W / 41.1599; -73.9648 (Ridge Road)
New York State Route 304   NY-304 41°09′48″N 73°58′05″W / 41.1632°N 73.9681°W / 41.1632; -73.9681 (New York State Route 304)
Haverstraw Road Old Route 304 41°10′17″N 73°58′11″W / 41.17134°N 73.96984°W / 41.17134; -73.96984 (Haverstraw Road)

AbbreviationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Bridges are man-made marvels of the Hackensack River". North Jersey.com. July 15, 2010. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  2. ^ "Hackensack River". The Travels of Tug 44. www.tug44.org. Retrieved November 7, 2012.
  3. ^ Wang, Dayi; Lynne M. Baumann; Feraidoon Kashani (October 2002). Movable Versus Fixed - Wittpenn Bridge Replacement (PDF) (Report). Heavy Movable Structures.
  4. ^ Modica, Glenn. "The Hackensack River Vertical Lift Bridges Historic District" (PDF). Richard Grubb Associates. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  5. ^ "New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places - Hudson County". New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection - Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved January 19, 2016.
  6. ^ "The Hackensack River: A True Come-Back Story". Haceknsack Riverkeeper. Retrieved October 30, 2012.
  7. ^ Jeffs, Ed (April 2005). "A History of Lake Lucille & Vicinity". Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  8. ^ McKelvey, Bill. "Chronology: Transportation Milestones Around the CRR of NJ Jersey City Terminal (now Liberty State Park) and the NJ / NY Port Area". Liberty Historic Railway. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  9. ^ Snow, Violet (October 2, 2011). "Little Ferry 'tries to improve living' for residents". The Record (Bergen County). Retrieved October 10, 2012.
  10. ^ Howitt, Naomi; Howitt, george (1976), Musket, Anchor, and Plow: The Story of River Edge, 1677-1976, Arno Press, ISBN 0405098596
  11. ^ "Drawbridges and Railroad Operation" (PDF), The New York Times, May 1, 1903, retrieved October 31, 2012
  12. ^ a b Marshall, Stephen (December 2004). "The Meadowlands Before the Commission: Three Centuries of Human Use and Alteration of the Newark and Hackensack Meadows". 2 (1). Urban Habitats. Dredging of the Hackensack River began in the 1900s, when the corps dug a 12-foot-deep channel. The current Hackensack River channel is 32 feet deep for the first 3 miles, 25 feet deep for the next ¼ mile, and 15 feet deep for an additional ½ mile. The channel varies between 800 and 200 feet in width Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  13. ^ Newark Bay/Hackensack River/Passaic River Study Area Report (PDF). Hudson-Raritan Estuary Environmental Restoration Feasibility (Report). United States Army Corps of Engineers. June 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 31, 2010. Retrieved October 21, 2012.
  14. ^ "Ecology Along the Hackensack River" (PDF). Hackensack Water Works. Rutgers University School of Environmental and Biological Sciences Center for Urban Sustainability. August 2012. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  15. ^ Newark Bay, Hackensack and Passaic Rivers – Hackensack River, New Jersey (PDF). Report of Channel Conditions 100 to 400 Feet Wide (ER 1130-2-306) (Report). April 18, 2011. Retrieved October 21, 2012.
  16. ^ Army Corps of Engineers. "Meadowlands Environmental Site Investigation Compilation". New Jersey Meadowlands Commission. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  17. ^ Olsen, Kevin K. (2008), A Great Conveniency: A Maritime History of the Passaic River, Hackensack River, and Newark Bay, American History Imprints, ISBN 9780975366776
  18. ^ a b "117.723 Hackensack River", Title 33: Navigation and Navigable Waters Part 117—Drawbridge Operations Regulations, US Government Printing Office, October 20, 2012, retrieved October 20, 2012
  19. ^ Cichowksi, John (June 20, 2010), "Historic Bridge Getting Face-lift", The Record, retrieved October 20, 2012
  20. ^ Sheenan, Bill (Winter 2006). "The Truth About Traffic On the River". At the Helm: A Word from Captain Bill. Hackensack Riverkeeper. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  21. ^ Maag, Christopher (February 21, 2015). "When Bergen County sludge meets rusty Amtrak bridge, both sides lose". The Record.
  22. ^ "Drawbridge Schedules". NJDOT. April 12, 2012. Retrieved November 5, 2012.
  23. ^ "Overview". Route 7 Wittpenn Bridge. NJDOT. August 5, 2011. Retrieved November 6, 2012.
  24. ^ "Portal Bridge Capacity Enhancement Project" (Press release). NJDOT. Retrieved November 1, 2012.
  25. ^ "U.S. Route 1-9 Truck straight line diagram" (PDF). NJDOT. Retrieved December 21, 2016.
  26. ^ 33CFR117.723(c)
  27. ^ https://bridgehunter.com/nj/bergen/bh73369/
  28. ^ bridgesnyc: Midtown Bridge (Hackensack and Bogota)
  29. ^ "Elm Street Bridge". Bridgehunter.com. Retrieved September 22, 2017.
  30. ^ "New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places". New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection - Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved January 19, 2016.
  31. ^ Ryall, M. J.; Parke, J. E. Harding, G. A. R. (December 14, 2013). "Bridge Management: Inspection, Maintenance, Assessment and Repair". Springer. ISBN 9781489972323.

SourcesEdit

External linksEdit

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX