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List of battalions of the Durham Light Infantry

This is a list of battalions of the Durham Light Infantry, which existed as a regiment of the British Army from 1881 to 1968.

Contents

Original compositionEdit

 
Victoria crown cap badge of the Durham Light Infantry (1881—1902)

When the 68th Regiment of Foot and the 106th Regiment of Foot became the Durham Light Infantry (DLI) in 1881 under the Cardwell-Childers reforms of the British Armed Forces, seven pre-existing militia and volunteer battalions of County Durham were integrated into the structure of the DLI. These latter battalions had existed intermittently for some time, but had been made permanent in reaction to a perceived threat of invasion by France the late 1850s.[1][2][3] The militia, in two battalions, were more appealing to the working classes as the equipment was government funded, while the volunteers were organised as "rifle volunteer corps", independent of the British Army, financially self-supporting and composed primarily of the middle class, they underwent a number of reorganisations before reaching the form in which they were incorporated into the county regiment.[4][5][6]

Battalion Formed Formerly Depot/Headquarters
Regular
1st 25 August 1756[7] 2/23rd Regiment of Foot, 68th Regiment of Foot (Lambton's Regiment of Foot) (22 April 1758[8]), 68th (Durham) Regiment of Foot (15 August 1782[9]), 68th (Durham) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry) (late 1808[10]) Sunderland (since 1873)
2nd 1839[11] 2nd Bombay European Regiment, 2nd Regiment Bombay European Light Infantry (1840[12]), 2nd European Regiment Bombay Light Infantry (14 December 1854[13]), Her Majesty's 2nd Regiment of Bombay European Light Infantry (3 November 1859[14]), 106th Regiment Bombay Light Infantry (30 July 1862[15]) Sunderland (since 1873)
Militia
3rd (Militia) 1759 1st Durham Fusiliers[16] Barnard Castle (since 1853)
4th (Militia) 1853 2nd North Durham Militia[16] Durham (since 1853)
Volunteers
1st Durham Rifle Volunteer Battalion December 1861 4th Administrative Battalion Durham Rifle Volunteer Corps[17][18] Stockton
2nd Durham Rifle Volunteer Battalion August 1861 2nd Administrative Battalion Durham Rifle Volunteer Corps[17][18] Bishop Auckland
3rd (Sunderland) Durham Rifle Volunteer Battalion February 1861 3rd (The Sunderland) Durham Rifle Volunteer Corps[17][18][19] Sunderland
4th Durham Rifle Volunteer Battalion August 1861 1st Administrative Battalion Durham Rifle Volunteer Corps[17][18] Chester-le-Street
5th Durham Rifle Volunteer Battalion August 1861 3rd Administrative Battalion Durham Rifle Volunteer Corps[17][18] Gateshead

In December 1887 the Durham Rifle Volunteer Battalions were renamed as Volunteer Battalions of the Durham Light Infantry retaining their Administrative battalion numbers.[20] The 3rd Corps sub-title was granted in 1867, with the slight change officially registered in 1887.[21]

ReorganisationEdit

The Territorial Force (renamed the Territorial Army in 1920) was formed in 1908, from the volunteer infantry battalions of the county regiments, and other volunteer arms. The militia battalions transferred to the "Reserve" or the "Special Reserve". The 3rd and 4th battalions exchanged numbers that year, and were recast as the 3rd (Reserve) and 4th (Extra Reserve) battalions in a draft finding role.[22] The reason for this apparently pointless exchange of numbers was that in the event of a mobilisation the War Office intended to use the 3rd battalion of a regiment to provide reinforcements for the regular battalions, while if a regiment had a 4th battalion it would be mobilised as a whole unit. The older unit (1st Durham Fusiliers, then the 3rd battalion) wished to remain as a fighting unit, and so exchanged numbers.[23] All volunteer battalions were renumbered to create a single numerical sequence.[24]

Battalion Formerly
3rd (Reserve) 4th (Militia)
4th (Extra Reserve) 3rd (Militia)
5th 1st Volunteer Battalion
6th 2nd Volunteer Battalion
7th 3rd Volunteer Battalion
8th 4th Volunteer Battalion
9th 5th Volunteer Battalion

First World WarEdit

 
Brass shoulder title as used by regulars and service battalions in the First World War

The Durham Light Infantry would send 22 battalions overseas and lose 12006 other ranks during the course of the war.[25] The regiment's territorial components formed duplicate second and third line battalions of progressively lower fitness men.[26] Many new battalions, technically of the Regular Army, were formed as part of Secretary of State for War Lord Kitchener's appeal for an initial 100,000 men volunteers in August 1914, referred to as the New Army or Kitchener's Army. The 18th and 20th Service battalions, were referred to as "Pals" because they were predominantly composed of work colleagues, the 19th battalion was originally a Bantam battalion.[27]

Battalion Date Formed Service Fate Notes
Regular
1st 22 April 1756 India (NWF), Afghanistan One of eight out of the 52 regular Army infantry battalions ordered to stay in India.[28]
2nd 1839 Western Front, Army of Occupation Attached to 18th Brigade, 6th Division throughout the war.[28]
Battle patch, a shield in regimental colours painted on the helmet from August 1918.[29]
Reserve and Special Reserve
3rd (Reserve) 1853 Britain Not embodied, used as a source of replacements for the Regular battalions.[28]
4th (Extra Reserve) 1759 Britain Used as a source of replacements for the Regular battalions.[28]
Territorial Force
1/5th 1861 Western Front Reduced to cadre strength 15 June 1918 Attached to 150th (York and Durham) Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Division until February 1918, then with 151st (Durham Light Infantry) Brigade.[28]
Battle-patch, a slate blue square on the upper arm.[30]
1/6th 1861 Western Front Reduced to cadre strength 15 June 1918 Attached to 151st (Durham Light Infantry) Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Division until June 1918.[28]
Battle-patch, a red diamond on the upper arm, and helmet.[31]
1/7th 1861 Western Front. Demobilised June 1919 Attached to 151st (Durham Light Infantry) Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Division until it became the division's pioneer battalion in May 1915. Transferred to 8th Division and absorbed the 22nd Battalion 23 June 1918[28][19]
1/8th 1861 Western Front Reduced to cadre strength 15 June 1918 Attached to 151st (Durham Light Infantry) Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Division until June 1918.[28]
Battle-patch, a slate blue coloured diamond on the upper arm.[31]
1/9th 1861 Western Front, Army of Occupation. Attached to 151st (Durham Light Infantry) Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Division until it became the pioneer battalion for the 62nd (2nd West Riding) Division in February 1918.[28]
Battle-patch (while in 50th Div), a green diamond on the upper arm.[31][32]
2/5th[28] Stockton and Darlington, September 1914 Britain, Salonika. Disbanded October 1919 Part of 189th (2nd York and Durham) Brigade, 63rd (2nd Northumbrian) Division until July 1916. Transferred to 228th Brigade, 28th Division when in Salonika.
2/6th[28] Gateshead, 26 September 1914 Britain, Western Front Disbanded post war Part of 190th (2nd Durham Light Infantry) Brigade, 63rd (2nd Northumbrian) Division until July 1916. Went to France with the 177th Brigade, 59th (2nd North Midland) Division in May 1918.
2/7th[28][33] Sunderland, 16 September 1914 Britain, Russia Disbanded 1919 Part of 190th (2nd Durham Light Infantry) Brigade, 63rd (2nd Northumbrian) Division until July 1916. North Russia Intervention 1918–19
2/8th[28] Durham, October 1914 Britain Disbanded December 1917 Part of 190th (2nd Durham Light Infantry) Brigade, 63rd (2nd Northumbrian) Division until July 1916.
2/9th[28] Gateshead, 11 September 1914 Britain, Salonika Disbanded January 1920 Part of 190th (2nd Durham Light Infantry) Brigade, 63rd (2nd Northumbrian) Division. Part of the Army Troops in Salonika.
3/5th[34] April 1915 Britain Disbanded post-war Re-designated as 5th (Reserve) Battalion on 8 April 1916; absorbed 3/6th, 3/7th, 3/8th and 3/9th battalions on 1 September 1916[34]
3/6th[34] April 1915 Britain Absorbed into 5th (Reserve) Battalion on 1 September 1916 Redesignated as 6th (Reserve) Battalion on 8 April 1916[34]
3/7th[34] April 1915 Britain Absorbed into 5th (Reserve) Battalion on 1 September 1916 Redesignated as 7th (Reserve) Battalion on 8 April 1916[34]
3/8th[34] April 1915 Britain Absorbed into 5th (Reserve) Battalion on 1 September 1916 Redesignated as 8th (Reserve) Battalion on 8 April 1916[34]
3/9th[34] April 1915 Britain Absorbed into 5th (Reserve) Battalion on 1 September 1916 Redesignated as 9th (Reserve) Battalion on 8 April 1916[34]
26th[34] Clacton, 1 January 1917 by redesignation of 23rd Provisional Battalion, T.F. Britain Disbanded post-war 23rd Provisional Battalion, T.F. was formed in 1915 by Home Service personnel of T.F. battalions
27th[34] St. Osyth, 1 January 1917 by redesignation of 25th Provisional Battalion, T.F. Britain Disbanded post-war 25th Provisional Battalion, T.F. was formed in 1915 by Home Service personnel of T.F. battalions.
New Army
10th (Service)[28] September 1914 Western Front Disbanded in February 1918 as part of the Army reorganisation, reinforcing other D.L.I battalions. Part of 43rd Brigade, 14th (Light) Division until disbanded. Nicknamed "The Shiny Tenth".
Battle-patch, a silhouette of a regimental cap badge in red.[35]
11th (Service)[28] September 1914 Western Front Disbanded post war Part of 60th Brigade, 20th (Light) Division until converted into the division's pioneer battalion in January 1915.
12th (Service)[28] September 1914 Western Front, Italy Disbanded post war Part of the 68th Brigade, 23rd Division throughout the war.
Battle-patch, a green rectangle with a central red horizontal stripe and a central green circle, worn on the sleeve.[36]
13th (Service) September 1914[28] Western Front, Italy Disbanded post war Part of the 68th Brigade, 23rd Division until September 1918 when it returned to the Western Front from Italy with the 74th Brigade, 25th Division.
Battle-patch (while in 23rd Div), a diamond divided into red and green triangular halves, orientation showed company, worn on the sleeve.[36]
14th (Service)[28] September 1914 Western Front Disbanded February 1918 as part of the Army reorganisation, reinforcing other D.L.I battalions. Part of the 64th Brigade, 21st Division until September 1915 then joined the 2nd Battalion in 18th Brigade, 6th Infantry Division until disbandment.
Battle patch (while in the 6th Division) a dark green triangle.[37]
15th (Service)[28] September 1914 Western Front Disbanded post war Part of the 64th Brigade, 21st Division throughout the war.
Battle-patch, a green inverted triangle on the sleeve and back collar, from 1918 a yellow bugle replaced the square on the back collar.[38][39]
16th (Reserve)[28] October 1914 Britain Became 1st Training Reserve Battalion in 1st Reserve Brigade, September 1916.
17th (Reserve)[28] Barnard Castle October 1914 Britain Became 2nd Training Reserve Battalion in 1st Reserve Brigade, September 1916 Returned to the regiment as the 53rd (Young Soldiers) Battalion.
18th (Service) (1st County)[28] 24 September 1914 Suez, Western Front Disbanded post war A Pals battalion. Part of the 93rd Brigade, 31st Division throughout the war.
Battle-patch, a red horizontal rectangle on a green rectangle on the sleeve, brigade patch a white and red square divided diagonally on the back.[40]
19th (Service) (2nd County)[28] West Hartlepool, 3 March 1915 Western Front Disbanded post war A Bantam battalion. Part of the 106th Brigade, 35th Division, moving to the 104th Brigade in February 1918. It ceased to be a Bantam unit in January 1917.
Battle patch, the cap badge stencilled in white on the front of the helmet.[41]
20th (Service) (Wearside)[28] Sunderland June 1915 Western Front, Italy, Army of Occupation Disbanded post war A Pals battalion. Part of the 123rd Brigade, 41st Division, moving to the 124th Brigade in March 1918.
Battle-patch, a red inverted triangle under an upper segment of an annulus.[42]
21st (Reserve)[28] Cocken Hall 29 July 1915 Britain Disbanded post war Formed as local reserve battalion from depot companies of 18th and 20th Battalions. Became 87th Training Reserve Battalion in 20th Reserve Brigade, September 1916[43]
22nd (Service) (3rd County Pioneers)[28] 1 October 1915 Western Front Merged with 1/7th pioneer Battalion (50th (Northumbrian) Division) 23 June 1918 A Pals battalion; 3rd County Battalion. Arrived in France unbrigaded with the 19th (Western) Division in July 1915, then attached to 8th Division as divisional pioneers until June 1918.
Battle patch, two circles, red and green side by side.[44]
23rd (Reserve)[34] Catterick, October 1915 Britain Absorbed in Reserve Battalions of 20th Reserve Brigade on 1 September 191 at Hornsea Formed as local reserve battalion from depot companies of 19th Battalion
29th (Service)[28] Brookwood, Surrey, 19 June 1918 Western Front Disbanded post war Formed from a cadre of the 2/7th Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment, and included drafts from the 26th and 27th Battalions. Part of 41st Brigade, 14th (Light) Division from July 1918.
Others
25th (Works)[28] May 1916 Britain Disbanded post war Part of Northern Command.
28th (Home Service)[28] April 1918 Britain Disbanded post war
51st (Graduated)[28] October 1917 Army of Occupation 1919 Disbanded post war Originally the 11th (Reserve) Battalion of the North Staffordshire Regiment, before becoming the 4th Training Reserve Battalion, and then the 258th Battalion in 215th Brigade of the 72nd (Home Service) Division[43]
52nd (Graduated)[28] October 1917 Army of Occupation 1919 Disbanded post war Originally the 31st (Reserve) Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers, before becoming the 86th Training Reserve Battalion, and then the 273rd Battalion, of the 220th Brigade of the 73rd (Home Service) Division.[43]
53rd (Young Soldier)[28] October 1917 Army of Occupation 1919 Disbanded post war It was previously the 17th (Service) Battalion of the D.L.I.
Volunteer Corps
1st Battalion 9 August 1916 Gateshead Disbanded post war The Volunteer Corps were raised with overage or reserved occupation men early in the war under the terms of the 1863 Volunteer Act, that is for Home service only. With the introduction of conscription a new act was passed on 17 June 1916 with slightly more stringent terms. By August 1918 it had a strength of 256 officers and 10,408 N.C.O.s and men.[45]
2nd Battalion 9 August 1916 Sunderland Disbanded post war
3rd Battalion 9 August 1916 Bishop Auckland Disbanded post war
4th Battalion 9 August 1916 Darlington Disbanded post war
5th Battalion December 1916 Stockton Disbanded post war
6th Battalion December 1916 Hartlepool Disbanded post war
7th Battalion March 1917 Sunderland Disbanded post war
8th Battalion March 1917 Houghton le Spring Disbanded post war
9th Battalion August 1918 Birtley Disbanded post war
10th Battalion August 1918 West Hartlepool Disbanded post war
11th Battalion August 1918 Sunderland Disbanded post war

Inter-WarEdit

 
King's Crown cap badge with the 'South Africa 1900-02' battle-honour, worn by Durham Light Infantry territorial battalions from 1909 to 1953

By Late 1920, all of the regiment's war-raised battalions had disbanded, with many of their Colours laid up in Durham Cathedral.[46] Territorial Force battalions were reformed in 1921, renamed the Territorial Army later in the year.[47]

Battalion Date Formed/Reformed Service Fate Notes
Regular
1st 22 April 1756 Germany, Egypt, Britain, China[48]
2nd 1839 Russia, Turkey, India, China, Britain[49]
Reserve and Special Reserve
3rd (Reserve) Not reformed
4th (Extra Reserve) Not reformed
Territorial Army
5th Reformed 1920 Transferred to the Royal Engineers in 1938 and converted into a searchlight (S/L) battalion, becoming Royal Artillery in August 1940.[50] Split in 1938, forming the 1/5th and 2/5th battalions, became respectively the 54th and 55th (D.L.I.) Searchlight Regiments, the 54th with an attached ATS company.[51] The 55th (S/L) Regiment became the 113th (D.L.I.) Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment in January 1942.[52] Both regiments deployed to North West Europe in 1944 as part of 21st Army Group. The 113th L.A.A. Regimentt would help liberate Bergen-Belsen and aid the survivors. The 113th L.A.A. regiment ended the War around Hanover, the 54th (S/L) Regiment ended the War in Antwerp.[53][54]
6th Reformed 1920
7th Reformed 1920 Transferred to the Royal Engineers in 1936 and converted into a searchlight (S/L) battalion, becoming Royal Artillery in August 1940.[55] Initially the 47th (D.L.I.) A.A. Battalion R.E. (T.A.), on joining the Royal Artillery it became the 47th (D.L.I.) S/L Regiment R.A. (T.A.). In January 1942 it was renamed the 112th (D.L.I.) L.A.A. Regiment R.A. (T.A.),[56] and deployed to North West Europe in 1944 as part of XII Corps, with one battery converting to use the Land Mattress in March 1945. It ended the War in Hamburg[57]
8th Reformed 1920
9th Reformed 1920

Second World WarEdit

 
Second World War King's crown cap badge, worn by all battalions of the Durham Light Infantry (plastic, economy version 1942–1945)
 
Second World War shoulder title of the Durham Light Infantry (printed, economy version)

The regiments's expansion during the Second World War was modest compared to 1914–18. Existing territorial battalions formed duplicates as in WWI (using whole rather than fractional numbers), while National Defence Companies were used to create a new "Home Defence" battalion. Hostilities-only battalions were raised after the evacuation of Dunkirk.[58] In addition to this, 26 battalions of the Home Guard were affiliated to the regiment, wearing its cap badge,[59] and also by 1944 one Heavy Anti Aircraft (HAA) battery, and four rocket batteries (Z Battery).[60] Due to the daytime (or shift working) occupations of these men, the batteries required eight times the manpower of an equivalent regular battery.[61] A number of Light Anti-Aircraft (LAA) troops were formed from the local battalions to defend specific points, such as factories.[62]

Battalion Date formed/Reformed Served Fate Notes
Regular
1st 25 August 1756 North Africa, Syria, Mediterranean, Italy Part of (in order) the 22nd Infantry Brigade,[63] 22nd Guards Brigade (with 6th Indian Infantry Division a short while),[64] 23rd Infantry Brigade, (itself variously under Egypt Command, 4th and 6th Indian Infantry Divisions, I Corps (Australia) and 70th Division while the battalion was with it),[65] 233rd and 234th Brigades in Malta Command,[66] Middle East Command,[67] and finally 10th Indian Infantry Brigade of the 10th Indian Infantry Division.[68] Ended the War near Ferrara, Italy.[69]
2nd 1839 France, Burma Part of 6th Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division throughout the War. Ended the War in Rangoon, Burma.[70]
Supplementary Reserve
3rd Not Reformed
4th Not reformed
Territorial Army
6th 1861 France, Britain, Syria, Iraq, North Africa, Sicily, North West Europe Reduced to training cadre December 1944 and returned to the UK.[71] Spent the war with 151st Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division.

Distinguishing marks: Blackened cap badge on a red square. "Semi-official" shoulder title colours of red letters on a green background.[72] A 'Blue Durham flash' on the shoulder.[73]

8th 1861 France, Britain, Syria, Iraq, North Africa, Sicily, North West Europe Reduced to training cadre December 1944 and returned to the UK. Disbanded 16 January 1946 at Harrogate.[74] Spent the war with 151st Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division.

Distinguishing mark: Cap badge on a dark green circle. A 'Blue Durham flash' on the shoulder.

9th 1861 France, Britain, Syria, Iraq, North Africa, Sicily, North West Europe Disbanded 16 October 1946 in Germany at Hemer.[75] Spent the war with 151st Brigade, 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division until transferred to 131st Brigade of the 7th Armoured Division in December 1944. Ended the War in Hamburg.[76]

Distinguishing mark: a 'Blue Durham flash' on the shoulder while with 151st Brigade.

10th[77] September 1939 France, Britain, Iceland, North West Europe Disbanded September 1944.[78] 2nd line territorial of the 6th battalion. Spent the War with 70th Brigade, first with 23rd (Northumbrian) Division until June 1940, then 49th (West Riding) Infantry Division. Disbanded (as a junior, 2nd line unit) to maintain the fighting strength of other infantry battalions in the Second Army.
11th [77] September 1939 France, Britain, Iceland, North West Europe. Disbanded September 1944 2nd line territorial of the 8th battalion. History same as the 10th.
12th[77] September 1939 France, Britain, Iceland, North West Europe Renamed the 1st Battalion, Tyneside Scottish of the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) in January 1940.[79] 2nd line territorial of the 9th battalion.

Wore a green lanyard signalling its DLI origin[79]

Hostilities only
1/13th (Home Defence)[80] December 1939 from No 41 National Defence Company Britain Disbanded November 1941 by renumbering as 30th DLI
2/13th (Home Defence)[80] September 1940 from 13th Battalion Britain Disbanded December 1940 by renumbering as 18th DLI (1)
14th[80] June 1940 Britain Disbanded 1945 Brigaded in the 206th Independent Infantry Brigade with the 16th and 17th battalions until September 1942, at times part of Scottish Command, 44th (Home Counties) Infantry Division, 56th (London) Infantry Division and 46th Infantry Division it transferred to the 209th Independent Infantry Brigade as part of the 77th Infantry Division where its role changed in September 1943 to being reception centre for returning PoWs and convalescents. It ended the war in this role in Durham City in the 134th Infantry Brigade
15th[80] October 1940 from 50th (Holding) battalion Britain Converted into the 155th Regiment Royal Armoured Corps in November 1941. From March to November 1941 it was part of 217th Independent Infantry Brigade (Home) of the Durham and North Riding County Division.[81] As the 155th Regiment it was assigned to 35th Army Tank Brigade, 79th Armoured Division it was trained and equipped with Churchills, Rams Shermans and then Canal Defence Light tanks.[82] It left that division when designated as a training unit in April 1944. It was disbanded in May 1945.[83]
16th[84] June 1940 Britain, North Africa, Italy, Greece Disbanded January–February 1946 in Vienna Brigaded in the 206th Independent Infantry Brigade with the 14th and 17th battalions until December 1940, then spent the rest of the war with 139th Infantry Brigade, 46th Infantry Division.

Distinguishing mark: Cap badge on a dark square background[85]

17th[80] June 1940 at Shrewsbury Britain Disbanded September 1943 Brigaded in the 206th Independent Infantry Brigade until September In September 1942 the battalion became part of 164th Infantry Brigade of the 55th (West Lancashire) Infantry Division until September 1943.[86] The battalion had provided ~1900 trained officers and other ranks as replacements by the time of its disbandment.[87]
18th (1)[80] December 1940 formed from the 2/13th battalion. Britain Disbanded November 1941 by renumbering as 30th DLI.
18th (2)[88] March 1943, Geneifa, Egypt Italy, France Disbanded August 1945, Calais. Formed the infantry component of a Beach Brick supporting amphibious landings. Served under Middle East Command,[89] the U.S. Fifth Army,[90] Second British Army, and 21st Army Group lines of communications.[91]
30th (Home Defence)[80] November 1941 by the merger of 1/13th and 18th (1) battalions Britain Disbanded November 1942 Gradually exchanged cat 'B' fitness men for 'A1' and became field force battalion from June 1942
70th (Young Soldiers)[80] December 1940 Britain Disbanded August 1943, Tow Law Served as demonstration battalion for G.H.Q. Battle School.
Over 400 officers and men sent overseas, intended for the 151st Brigade, over 150 however reached the 16th Battalion D.L.I. and the 6th Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment of the 138th Brigade, both in 46th division then in Italy. After their first actions in Italy the C.O. of Lincolns said "...If we received drafts like this every time, the war would soon be over.".[92]
Home Guard[93]
Battalion Headquarters Formation Sign (dark blue on khaki) Battalion Headquarters Formation Sign (dark blue on khaki)
1st Blaydon DHM 1 2nd Chester le Street DHM 2
3rd Lanchester DHM 3 4th Consett DHM 4
5th Hamsterley DHM 5 6th Stanley DHM 6
7th Boldon DHM 7 8th South Shields DHM 8
9th Sunderland DHM 9 10th Gateshead DHM 10
11th Durham DHM 11 12th Castle Eden DHM 12
13th South Hylton DHM 13 14th Houghten le Spring DHM 14
15th Bishop Auckland DHM 15 16th Weardale DHM 16
17th Barnard Castle DHM 17 18th West Hartlepool DHM 18
19th Stockton on Tees DHM 19 20th Darlington DHM 20
21st Gateshead DHM 21 22nd Weatly Hill DHM 22
23rd Washington DHM 23 24th Sunderland DHM 24
25th Jarrow DHM 25 26th Seaham DHM 26
Home Guard Anti-Aircraft units[60][62]
Formation Sign
(dark blue on khaki)
Headquarters or Location AA Formation and Designation Formation Sign
(dark blue on khaki)
Headquarters or Location AA Formation and Designation
DHM 71 Gateshead 71st Battery, 8th Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Home Guard) (HAA) DHM 101 South Shields 110th Battery, 8th Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Home Guard) (Z battery)
DHM 102 Stockton-on-Tees 117th Battery, 11th Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Home Guard) (Z battery) DHM 103 Sunderland 213th Battery, 8th Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Home Guard) (Z battery)
DHM 104 Durham 228th Battery, 11th Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Home Guard) (Z battery) DHM 18[94] Hartlepool,
(British Periclase Ltd)
A Troop LAA
DHM 19 Billingham on Tees,
(ICI Ltd)
B, D Troops LAA DHM 19 Middlesbrough C Troop, 11th Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Home Guard) (LAA)
DHM 20 Aycliffe,
(Royal Ordnance Factory)
E, F Troops LAA DHM 23 Washington,
(Washington Chemical Co.)
G Troop LAA

Post-World War IIEdit

 
Queens crown cap badge of the Durham Light Infantry (1953—1968)

In the immediate post-war period, the army was significantly reduced with all regiments being reduced to one battalion. The D.L.I. was one of only seven regiments to re-raise its second battalion in the early 1950s.[95][note 1] After a long period of suspended animation the Militia battalions were finally disbanded in 1953.

Battalion Service Fate Notes
Regular
1st Germany, Korea, Cyprus, Borneo Amalgamated with other light infantry regiments to form The Light Infantry in 1968 Colours laid up in Durham Cathedral 12 December 1968.[96]
2nd Germany Amalgamated with 1st battalion, September 1948 Reformed 1952, re-amalgamated with the 1st battalion in 1955.
Supplementary Reserve
3rd Disbanded 1953
4th Disbanded 1953 Colours laid up in the parish church of St Mary the Virgin, Barnard Castle, 16 December 1956.[23]
Territorial Army
6th Amalgamated with the 8th battalion on 26 February 1967 to form the 6th/8th Battalion, the Durham Light Infantry. Disbanded and reformed on 1 April 1967 as D Company, The Light Infantry Volunteers and the 6th/8th (Territorial) Battalion, The Durham Light Infantry, the latter as part of the TAVR III.[97] Re-raised in March 1947.[75]
8th Same as the 6th battalion.[97] Re-raised in March 1947.
9th Re-raised and disbanded 1947, by renaming as the 17th battalion (T.A.) the Parachute Regiment. Colours laid up in the parish church of St Mary, Gateshead, 5 November 1949.[98]

NotesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Beckett p. 164
  2. ^ Ward pp. 10-22
  3. ^ Vane pp.288-297
  4. ^ Ward pp. 252-263
  5. ^ Vane pp. 297-298
  6. ^ Vane pp.304-306
  7. ^ Vane pp.1-3
  8. ^ Ward p. 27
  9. ^ Ward p. 60
  10. ^ Vane p. 40
  11. ^ Vane p. 107
  12. ^ Vane p. 109
  13. ^ Vane p. 112
  14. ^ Ward p.239
  15. ^ Ward p. 242
  16. ^ a b Ward p. 252
  17. ^ a b c d e Ward pp. 263-4
  18. ^ a b c d e Westlake, pp. 74–8.
  19. ^ a b Dunn.
  20. ^ Vane p. 307
  21. ^ Westlake p.75
  22. ^ Ward p. 255
  23. ^ a b Order of Service (4th)
  24. ^ Ward p. 266
  25. ^ Ward pps. 334, 446
  26. ^ Ward p. 332
  27. ^ Ward pp. 328-329
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag Ward Ch10
  29. ^ Hibberd p. 10
  30. ^ Hibberd p. 51
  31. ^ a b c Hibbard p. 52
  32. ^ The D.L.I. Museum
  33. ^ Dunn, pp. 196–200.
  34. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m James 1978, p. 101
  35. ^ Ward p. 325
  36. ^ a b Chappell p. 16
  37. ^ Hibbard p, 10
  38. ^ Hibbard p. 22
  39. ^ Chappell pp. 26, 43
  40. ^ Chappell p. 18
  41. ^ Hibbard p. 41
  42. ^ Chappell pps. 30, 46
  43. ^ a b c Barker, Chris. "Training Reserve Battalions". The Long Long Trail. Retrieved 16 January 2018.
  44. ^ Hibbard p. 13
  45. ^ Ward p. 334
  46. ^ Miles pp.389-370
  47. ^ Beckett p. 246
  48. ^ Ward pp. 449-455
  49. ^ Ward pp.455-458
  50. ^ "54 (DLI) Searchlight Regiment RA(TA)". ra39-45.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 2 March 2015.
  51. ^ Rissik p. 305
  52. ^ "55 (DLI) Searchlight Regiment RA(TA)". ra39-45.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 2 March 2015.
  53. ^ Sadler ch. 10
  54. ^ Rissik pp. 304, 307
  55. ^ "47 (DLI) Searchlight Regiment RA(TA)". ra39-45.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 2 March 2015.
  56. ^ "112 (Durham Lt Inf) Light AA Regiment RA(TA)". ra39-45.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/. Retrieved 2 March 2015.
  57. ^ Rissik pp. 301-4
  58. ^ Ward pp.460-466
  59. ^ Sadler p. 326
  60. ^ a b Whittaker pp. 104-105
  61. ^ Whittaker p. 23
  62. ^ a b Whittaker pps. 105, 121-122
  63. ^ Joslen p. 264
  64. ^ Joslen p. 265
  65. ^ Joslen p. 267
  66. ^ Joslen pp. 395—396
  67. ^ Joslen p. 485
  68. ^ Joslen p. 532
  69. ^ Rissik p. 235
  70. ^ Rissik p. 207
  71. ^ Ward p. 543
  72. ^ Davis p. 86
  73. ^ Lewis p56
  74. ^ Lewis p.304
  75. ^ a b Ward p. 564
  76. ^ Ward p. 546
  77. ^ a b c Ward p. 460
  78. ^ Rissik pp. 268-269
  79. ^ a b Ward p. 461
  80. ^ a b c d e f g h Rissik Ch. 10
  81. ^ Rissik p. 317
  82. ^ "Now It Can Be Told! - Tanks That Turn Night Into Local Day" The War Illustrated, Volume 9, No. 220, Page 470, 23 November 1945.
  83. ^ Rissik p. 320
  84. ^ Rissik Ch. 5
  85. ^ Hart p. 104
  86. ^ Rissik p. 314
  87. ^ Rissik p.316
  88. ^ Rissik pp. 3-4 (footnote)
  89. ^ Joslen p. 487
  90. ^ Joslen p. 467
  91. ^ Joslen p. 463
  92. ^ Rissik pp. 328-329
  93. ^ "History of the Home Guard". Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  94. ^ Whittaker p. 26
  95. ^ Ward p. 559
  96. ^ Order of Service 1st
  97. ^ a b "British Army Territorial Infantry regiments post 1945". The British Army. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  98. ^ Order of Service 9th

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