List of bacterial vaginosis microbiota

This article is about the specific organisms found in vagina associated with bacterial vaginosis. For More details, see bacterial vaginosis.

Bacterial vaginosis is caused by an imbalance of the naturally occurring bacteria in the vagina.[1][2] The normally predominant species of Lactobacilli are markedly reduced.[3] This is the list of organisms that are found in the vagina that are associated with bacterial vaginosis, an infectious disease of the vagina caused by excessive growth of specific bacteria.[4][5] The census and relationships among the microbiota are altered in BV resulting in a complex bacterial milieu. Some species have been identified relatively recently.[6] Having infections with the listed pathogens increases the risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS.[7][8]

Contents

MicrobiotaEdit

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Amaya-Guio, Jairo; Martinez-Velasquez, Mercy Yolima; Viveros-Carreño, David Andres; Sierra-Barrios, Eloisa Mercedes; Grillo-Ardila, Carlos F; Amaya-Guio, Jairo (2015). "Antibiotic treatment for the sexual partners of women with bacterial vaginosis". Protocols. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD011701. 
  2. ^ "Bacterial Vaginosis (BV): Condition Information". National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 2013-05-21. Retrieved 3 March 2015. 
  3. ^ Nardis, C.; Mastromarino, P.; Mosca, L. (September 2013). "Vaginal microbiota and viral sexually transmitted diseases". Annali di Igiene. 25 (5): 443–56. doi:10.7416/ai.2013.1946. PMID 24048183. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Clark, Natalie; Tal, Reshef; Sharma, Harsha; Segars, James (2014). "Microbiota and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease". Seminars in Reproductive Medicine. 32 (01): 043–049. doi:10.1055/s-0033-1361822. ISSN 1526-8004. PMC 4148456 . PMID 24390920. 
  5. ^ "What are the symptoms of bacterial vaginosis?". National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 2013-05-21. Retrieved 3 March 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c d Larsen, Bryan; Hwang, Joseph (2010). "Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes: A Fresh Look". Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2010: 1–7. doi:10.1155/2010/521921. ISSN 1064-7449. 
  7. ^ Kenyon, C; Colebunders, R; Crucitti, T (December 2013). "The global epidemiology of bacterial vaginosis: a systematic review". American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 209 (6): 505–23. doi:10.1016/j.ajog.2013.05.006. PMID 23659989. 
  8. ^ "What are the treatments for bacterial vaginosis (BV)?". National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 2013-07-15. Retrieved 9 May 2015. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f Mastromarino, Paola; Vitali, Beatrice; Mosca, Luciana (2013). "Bacterial vaginosis: a review on clinical trials with probiotics" (PDF). New Microbiologica. 36: 229–238. PMID 23912864. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Africa, Charlene; Nel, Janske; Stemmet, Megan (2014). "Anaerobes and Bacterial Vaginosis in Pregnancy: Virulence Factors Contributing to Vaginal Colonisation". International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 11 (7): 6979–7000. doi:10.3390/ijerph110706979. ISSN 1660-4601. PMC 4113856 . PMID 25014248. 
  11. ^ Mastromarino, Paola; Vitali, Beatrice; Mosca, Luciana (2013). "Bacterial vaginosis: a review on clinical trials with probiotics" (PDF). New Microbiologica. 36: 229–238. PMID 23912864. 
  12. ^ Knoester, M.; Lashley, L. E. E. L. O.; Wessels, E.; Oepkes, D.; Kuijper, E. J. (2011). "First Report of Atopobium vaginae Bacteremia with Fetal Loss after Chorionic Villus Sampling". Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 49 (4): 1684–1686. doi:10.1128/JCM.01655-10. ISSN 0095-1137. PMC 3122803 . PMID 21289141. 

External linksEdit