List of aerial lift manufacturers

This is a list of the current and former aerial lift manufacturers. This list includes surface lift manufacturers.

CurrentEdit

FormerEdit

  • Abig – Germany[31]
  • American Steel and Wire – United States
  • Applevage – France, manufactured ropeways between the 1930s and 1962[32]
  • ATG – Germany[33]
  • Australasian Ropeway – Australia, manufactured chairlifts between the 1960s and 1970s
  • Badoni – Italy[34]
  • Bell – Switzerland, manufactured ropeways between 1877 and 1968[35]
  • BM Lifts – Canada
  • Breco – United Kingdom
  • Cables & Monorail – France[36]
  • CECIL – France[37]
  • Ceretti & Tanfani – Italy
  • Constam – Switzerland, founded in 1929[38]
  • Creissels (DCSA) – France
  • De Pretis – Austria[39]
  • Drago – Italy[40]
  • Duport – France[41]
  • Funivie d'Italia – Italy[42]
  • Giovanola – Switzerland, manufactured ropeways between 1949 and the 1970s[43]
  • GMD Müller – Switzerland, founded in 1947, closed in 1985[N 10]
  • Hamilton – New Zealand[N 14]
  • Heuss – Germany
  • Hopkins – United States, founded in 1962, ropeway division acquired by SkyTrans in 2001
    • Roebling – United States, manufactured ropeways from 1940, acquired by Hopkins in 1965
  • Imes – Italy
  • Krupp – Germany[44]
  • LST Ropeway Systems – Germany[N 9]
  • Marchisio – Italy, founded in 1951, acquired by CCM Finotello in 1993[N 15]
  • McCallum – Australia, manufactured T-bars and chairlifts in the 1960s and 1970s
  • Mécalift – France, founded in 1976, closed in 1981[46]
    • Transcâble – France[47]
  • Miner-Denver – United States, founded in 1967, closed in 1970[48]
  • Mostostal – Poland, manufactured T-bars and chairlifts[49]
  • Murray-Latta – Canada
  • Nascivera – Italy
  • NSD Niederberger – Switzerland, founded in 1881, closed in 2007[N 16]
  • Odermatt – Switzerland
  • Pullman-Berry
    • Huntsinger Skilifts
  • PWH – Germany
    • Pohlig-Heckel-Bleichert (PHB) – Germany, merging of Pohlig, Heckel, and Bleichert
  • Riblet – United States, founded in 1908, closed in 2003
  • Ringer – Germany, founded in 1950, closed in 1953[48]
  • Sacif – Italy
  • Samson – Canada, manufactured ropeways between the 1960s and 1988[51]
  • Sakgiproshakht – Soviet Georgia, founded in 1946, closed in 1990[N 17]
    • Geospectrans – Georgia[N 18]
  • Skima – Switzerland
  • Skyway – Canada, manufactured ropeways during the 1970s
  • Stemag – Austria
  • Streiff – Switzerland
  • Swoboda – Austria, ropeway division founded in 1956[N 3]
  • Tbilisi Aircraft Manufacturing – Georgia[N 2][N 19]
  • Teletrasporti – Italy
  • Tiegel – United States, founded in 1959, ceased manufacturing ropeways in 1968[52]
  • Transporta Chrudim – Czechoslovakia[53]
  • Transtélé – France, founded in the 1970s, closed in 1979[54]
  • Trojer – Italy
  • Vöest Alpine – Austria
  • Weber – France
  • Wiesner – Czechoslovakia[55]
  • Wito – Austria
    • Dolomitenwerk – Austria[N 20]
  • Wopfner – Austria, founded in 1952, closed in 1996[N 21]
  • Wullschleger – Switzerland[57]
  • Yac – France, manufactured platter lifts
  • Yan Lift – United States, founded in 1965, closed in 1996[N 22]
  • Zemella – Italy

Acquired by Doppelmayr Garaventa GroupEdit

  • CTEC – United States, founded in 1978, merged with Garaventa in 1992[N 23]
    • Partek – United States, founded in 1996, acquired by Doppelmayr CTEC in 2005[48]
      • Borvig – United States, closed in 1993[N 24]
    • Thiokol – United States, ropeway division founded in 1971 and closed in 1977[N 25]
  • Girak – Austria, acquired by Garaventa in 1996[N 26]
  • Hölzl – Italy, founded in 1945, acquired by Doppelmayr in 2002[N 27]
    • Agamatic – Italy, founded in 1981, merged with Doppelmayr in 2002[N 27]
  • Küpfer – Switzerland, founded in 1948, merged with Garaventa in 1985[N 28]
  • Von Roll – Switzerland, ropeway division acquired by Doppelmayr in 1996
    • Bühler – Switzerland, founded in 1962, acquired by Von Roll in 1975
    • Habegger – Switzerland, manufactured ropeways from 1945, acquired by Von Roll in 1982[N 29]
      • Brändle – Switzerland
        • Sameli-Huber – Switzerland
      • Oehler – Switzerland, ropeway division acquired by Habegger in the 1970s
    • Hall Ski-Lift – United States, founded in 1954,[48] merged with Von Roll in 1982
  • WSO Städeli – Switzerland, manufactured ropeways from 1957, acquired by Garaventa in 1991[59]
    • Tebru – Switzerland, acquired by WSO Städeli[59][60]

Acquired by HTI GroupEdit

  • Baco – Switzerland, founded in 1950, acquired by Poma in 1981[61][N 30]
  • Carlevaro & Savio – Italy, acquired by Agudio
  • Heron – United States, acquired by Poma[N 31]
  • Montagner – France, founded in 1968, acquired by Poma in 1994[65]
  • SACMI – France, founded in 1960,[66] acquired by Poma[N 32]
  • Waagner-Biro – Austria, ropeway division acquired by Leitner Ropeways in 1999[68]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Bartholet was previously also known as BMF.
  2. ^ a b c d e Company only manufactures cabins.
  3. ^ a b Swoboda Seilbahnbau GmbH ceased manufacturing ropeways, and was renamed Carvatech Karosserie- und Kabinenbau GmbH, known as Carvatech, in 2005.
  4. ^ Doppelmayr Holding SE operates various subsidiaries worldwide under the Doppelmayr and Garaventa brands. Seven of these are responsible for manufacturing parts,[6] namely Doppelmayr Seilbahnen GmbH (Austria), Garaventa AG (Switzerland), Doppelmayr Canada Ltd., Sanhe Doppelmayr Transport Systems Co., Ltd. (China), Doppelmayr France SAS, Doppelmayr Italia Srl, and Doppelmayr USA, Inc.[7] Doppelmayr has manufactured ropeways from 1937; Garaventa was founded in 1928.[8]
  5. ^ No ropeways are manufactured under the HTI Group brand, however the company operates several subsidiaries manufacturing ropeways.
  6. ^ Leitner AG / SpA operates several subsidiaries worldwide manufacturing ropeways under the Leitner Ropeways brand, namely Leitner GmbH (Austria), Leitner France SAS, and Leitech s.r.o. (Slovakia).[14]
  7. ^ Leitner-Poma of America, Inc. is registered in the United States, and is operational throughout North America, with a subsidiary in Canada called Leitner-Poma Canada Inc. The company was founded in 1981 as Poma of America.[16]
  8. ^ Sigma Cabins is incorporated as Sigma Composite SA.[18]
  9. ^ a b LST Ropeway Systems was acquired by MND Group (France) in 2012, and was renamed MND Ropeways in September 2020.[22] At the same time, the company merged with the French subsidiary of Bartholet.
  10. ^ a b Rowema AG succeeded GMD Müller Lifts AG in 1985.[24]
  11. ^ Ludwig Steurer Maschinen und Seilbahnenbau GmbH & Co KG is registered in Austria, and operates a subsidiary in Switzerland called Steurer Seilbahnen AG.
  12. ^ Tatralift was founded as TPMP Kežmarok, was renamed Tatrapoma in 1995, and became Tatralift in 2010.
  13. ^ Tosaku is incorporated as Tokyo Cableway Co., Ltd.[30]
  14. ^ The Hamilton Model B was the standard nutcracker tow across New Zealand and Australia in the 1950s and 1960s.
  15. ^ Marchisio was acquired by Doppelmayr in the 1980s. Doppelmayr sold the subsidiary to CCM Finotello in 1993.[5][45]
  16. ^ The ropeway division of NSD Niederberger was acquired by Inauen-Schätti in 2007, and went into liquidation shortly after.[50]
  17. ^ Sakgiproshakht was founded in Chiatura, and later moved to Tbilisi. The company was in charge of developing and implementing most cable cars built in former Soviet Union Republics.
  18. ^ Geospectrans was a Tbilisi-situated division of Sakgiproshakht, now in charge of repairing and renovating Soviet-time ropeways in Georgia.
  19. ^ Tbilisi Aircraft Manufacturing manufactured cabins for Sakgiproshakht developed ropeways from 1946 to 1990.
  20. ^ Wito was previously known as Dolomitenwerk.[56]
  21. ^ Wopfner declared bankruptcy and ceased manufacturing in 1996. The company was succeeded by Seilbahnsysteme GmbH in 2004, which was renamed Seilbahn-Landschaft-Technik GmbH in 2011. This company licenses design rights to BMF Bartholet, LST Ropeway Systems, and STM Sistem Teleferik.
  22. ^ Yan Lift was incorporated as Lift Engineering & Mfg. Co.
  23. ^ CTEC merged with the Garaventa's United States subsidiary in 1992 to form Garaventa CTEC, which later merged with the Doppelmayr's United States subsidiary in 2002 to form Doppelmayr CTEC, and became Doppelmayr USA, known simply as Doppelmayr, from 2011.
  24. ^ The rights to Borvig designs were acquired by Partek.
  25. ^ The rights to Thiokol designs were acquired by CTEC in 1978.
  26. ^ 50% of Girak was acquired by Garaventa in 1996 and became Girak-Garaventa. The remainder was acquired by Doppelmayr Garaventa Group in 2002 and the Girak name was discontinued.
  27. ^ a b Agamatic was founded in 1981 as a joint venture between Hölzl and Doppelmayr Lana. In 2002, Agamatic, Hölzl, and Doppelmayr Lana merged to form Doppelmayr Italia.
  28. ^ The company manufactured some ropeways as Garaventa-Küpfer for a few years following the merger.
  29. ^ Habegger was founded in 1943. Following financial difficulties in 1980 the company was acquired by the Bernese Cantonal Bank, and the ropeway division was acquired by Von Roll in 1982. The company manufactured some ropeways as Von Roll-Habegger until 1991.[58]
  30. ^ The company manufactured some ropeways as Baco-Poma for a few years following the acquisition.[62] Baco AG ceased manufacturing ropeways, however the company is still active, representing Leitner Ropeways and Poma in Switzerland.[63]
  31. ^ The company manufactured some ropeways as Heron-Poma for a few years following the acquisition.[64]
  32. ^ SACMI ceased manufacturing ropeways, however the company still manufactures components and pre-assembled parts for Poma's ropeways.[67]

External linksEdit

  1. ^ "Ansaku". Ansaku. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  2. ^ "Axet". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  3. ^ "Axet : Springbox ski lifts". ID Group. Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  4. ^ "The history of Bartholet". Bartholet. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  5. ^ a b "CCM Finotello". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  6. ^ "WIR Issue 3/2019 en". WIR:The Customer Magazine of the Doppelmayr/Garaventa Group (209): 24. 2019. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 13 June 2020.
  7. ^ "Doppelmayr Case Study". Siemens Automation. Siemens. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 13 June 2020.
  8. ^ "Group Milestones". Doppelmayr Seilbahnen. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  9. ^ "History". CWA. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  10. ^ "Om oss (About us)". Liftbyggarna AB (in Swedish). Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  11. ^ "FOD". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  12. ^ "GMM". GMM. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  13. ^ "Him Cableways". Him Cableways. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  14. ^ "Leitner Ropeways sites". Leitner Ropeways. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  15. ^ "Poma in a nutshell". Poma. Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  16. ^ "About Leitner Poma of America, Inc". Leitner-Poma. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  17. ^ "Leitner-Poma & Skytrac – 2 Companies Become 1 Mission". Skytrac. 1 May 2016. Retrieved 24 July 2016.
  18. ^ "Sigma Composite". BFM Verif. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  19. ^ "Who are we?". Skirail. Retrieved 28 June 2020.
  20. ^ "Skirail". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 31 August 2020.
  21. ^ "MEB". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  22. ^ "News Roundup: Name Change". Lift Blog. 11 September 2020. Retrieved 12 September 2020.
  23. ^ "History". Nippon Cable. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  24. ^ "About us". Rowema. Retrieved 7 September 2020.
  25. ^ "SkyTrans Homepage". SkyTrans. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  26. ^ "Decades of pioneering and individuality". Steurer Seilbahnen. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  27. ^ "Firma". STM Sistem Teleferik. Retrieved 27 June 2020.
  28. ^ "Quality Tramway Equipment". Superior Tramway. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  29. ^ "Sztokfisz - producent wyciągów narciarskich". sztokfisz.pl. Retrieved 2021-01-20.
  30. ^ a b "Company Profile". Tosaku (in Japanese). Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  31. ^ "Abig". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  32. ^ "Applevage". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  33. ^ "ATG Leipzig". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  34. ^ "Badoni". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  35. ^ "Bell". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  36. ^ "Cables & Monorail". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  37. ^ "CECIL". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  38. ^ "Constam". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  39. ^ "De Pretis". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  40. ^ "Drago". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  41. ^ "Duport". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  42. ^ "Funivie d'Italia". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  43. ^ "Giovanola". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 31 August 2020.
  44. ^ "TPH 2S 4 Brauneckbahn". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 25 August 2020.
  45. ^ "Marchisio". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  46. ^ "Mécalift". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  47. ^ "Transcâble". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  48. ^ a b c d "Aerial Lift Manufacturers". skilifts.org. Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  49. ^ "Mostostal". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  50. ^ "NSD Niederberger". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  51. ^ "Samson". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  52. ^ "Tiegel". skilifts.org. Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  53. ^ "Chrudim". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  54. ^ "Transtélé". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 31 August 2020.
  55. ^ "Wiesner". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  56. ^ "Wito Konstruktionen". Wito (in German). Retrieved 25 August 2020.
  57. ^ "Wullschleger". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  58. ^ "Habegger". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  59. ^ a b "Städeli". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  60. ^ "Tebru". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  61. ^ "Baco". Poma (in French). Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  62. ^ "Skilift Sontg Antoni, Alvaneu". YouTube (in German). 9 February 2019. Retrieved 3 August 2020.
  63. ^ "Baco". Baco (in German). Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  64. ^ "Colorado Ski Lift Manufacturers". ColoradoSkiHistory.com. Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  65. ^ "Montagner". bergbahnen.org (in German). Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  66. ^ "SACMI". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Archived from the original on 29 June 2020. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  67. ^ "Sacmi". Poma. Retrieved 29 June 2020.
  68. ^ "Waagner-Biró". remontees-mecaniques.net (in French). Retrieved 30 June 2020.