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This is a list of automobile engines developed and sold by the Suzuki Motor Corporation. Suzuki is unusual in never having made a pushrod automobile engine, and in having depended on two-strokes for longer than most. Their first four-stroke engine was the SOHC F8A, which appeared in 1977. Suzuki continued to offer a two-stroke engine in an automotive application for a considerably longer time than any other Japanese manufacturer.

Contents

Straight-twinsEdit

Suzulight SF Series — 360.88 cc (22.022 cu in) air-cooled 2-stroke, 59 mm × 66 mm (2.32 in × 2.60 in) bore/stroke (downsleeved copy of Lloyd LP400 engine)

FB Series — 359 cc (21.9 cu in) 2-stroke, 61 mm × 61.5 mm (2.40 in × 2.42 in) bore/stroke. A reed valve system was introduced with the L40 version of this engine.[1]

  • Suzuki FB engine — air-cooled
  • Suzuki FE/FE2 engine — air-cooled, FF applications
  • Suzuki L50 engine — water-cooled
  • Suzuki L60 engine — water-cooled 446 cc (27.2 cu in) 2-stroke, 68 mm × 61.5 mm (2.68 in × 2.42 in) bore/stroke (export only)

FA/FC (prototype) — 360 cc (22 cu in) 2-stroke, 64 mm × 56 mm (2.52 in × 2.20 in) bore/stroke

This prototype produced 25 bhp (19 kW) at 6000 rpm. It was fitted to a rear-engined prototype (also named FC) in 1961, as part of the development work for the LC10 Fronte.

Suzuki also briefly installed Daihatsu's 547 cc (33.4 cu in) two-cylinder AB10 OHC engine in SS11 Frontes built in 1977 and '78, as an interim measure while work was progressing on their own four-stroke engine.[2]

Straight-threesEdit

LC engineEdit

 
LC10W three-cylinder engine in Fronte Coupé
  • Suzuki LC engine — 2-stroke
    • LC10 — 356 cc (21.7 cu in) air-cooled 52 mm × 56 mm (2.05 in × 2.20 in)
    • LC10W/LC20 — 356 cc (21.7 cu in) water-cooled
    • LC50 — 475 cc (29.0 cu in) air-cooled 60 mm × 56 mm (2.36 in × 2.20 in)
    • T4A engine — 443 cc (27.0 cu in) 2-stroke 58 mm × 56 mm (2.28 in × 2.20 in). In spite of the name change, this was simply a bored out version of the LC10W.

FB engineEdit

  • Suzuki T5/LJ50 engine — 539 cc (32.9 cu in) 2-stroke 61 mm × 61.5 mm (2.40 in × 2.42 in). T5A engines were meant for RR applications, T5B for FF cars. The detuned engines used in the Carry and Jimny were called LJ50. Rather than being a newly developed engine, the T5 series is essentially an FB/L50 2-cylinder with a third cylinder added, its origins thus dating back to 1961.

F engineEdit

 
Suzuki K10B in a 2010 Suzuki Alto

C engineEdit

  • Suzuki C engine — 2-stroke
    • C10 785 cc (47.9 cu in) 70 mm × 68 mm (2.76 in × 2.68 in)
    • C20 1,100 cc (67.1 cu in) – 80 PS (59 kW) prototype engine for intended Suzuki Fronte 1100

G engineEdit

K engineEdit

 
K15B
 
K15B-C
  • Suzuki K engine — 0.7–1.0 L
    • K6A — 658 cc (40.2 cu in) 68 mm × 60.4 mm (2.68 in × 2.38 in)
    • K10B — 1.0 L; 60.9 cu in (998 cc) DOHC 12-valve (Increased compression from 9.0:1 to 10.0:1 and reduced frictional losses) 73 mm × 79.5 mm (2.87 in × 3.13 in)
      • 2009–present Suzuki Alto/A-Star/Suzuki Splash[3]
      • 2009–present Nissan Pixo
      • 2010–present Maruti Suzuki Wagon R in India/PakSuzuki WagonR in Pakistan
      • Suzuki K-Next engine — 1.0 L; 60.9 cu in (998 cc) DOHC 12-valve, Refined K10B engine, further increased compression from 10.0:1 to 11.0:1 & reduced frictional losses, Increased petrol mileage over 23 km/L (65 mpg‑imp; 54 mpg‑US).
      • 2014 – present Suzuki Celerio / 2017 – present Suzuki Cultus in Pakistan.
    • K10C — 1.0 L; 60.9 cu in (998 cc) DOHC 12-valve VVT DualJet Increased compression from 11.0:1 to 12.0:1 for more thermal efficiency, reduced frictional losses, Exhaust Gas Re-circulation, Engine Auto-Start-Stop, Increased mileage over 27 km/L (76 mpg‑imp; 64 mpg‑US)

R engineEdit

  • R engine
    • R06A — 658 cc (40.2 cu in) 64 mm × 68.2 mm (2.52 in × 2.69 in)

Power output: 54 PS (40 kW) and 64 PS (47 kW) for turbocharged.

Inline-foursEdit

F engineEdit

  • Suzuki F engine — 0.7–1.1 L I4
    • F6B — 0.7 L (658 cc) DOHC 16-valve 65 mm × 49.6 mm (2.56 in × 1.95 in). This shares the bore spacing of the three-cylinder F6A, although the stroke was shortened considerably to keep the displacement nearly the same.[5]
    • F8A — 0.8 L (797 cc), 62 mm × 66 mm (2.4 in × 2.6 in) SOHC - this was Suzuki's first four-stroke car engine.
    • F10A — Displacement 1.0 L; 59.2 cu in (970 cc), 65.5 mm × 72 mm (2.58 in × 2.83 in)
Indonesian market Carrys received a fuel injected engine for 2005, to enable them to meet the Euro 2 standards. This engine produces 60 PS (44 kW) at 5500 rpm and 7.8 kg⋅m (76 N⋅m) of torque at 4000 rpm.[6]
The 1.0 L; 59.2 cu in (970 cc) F10A engine as well as 0.9 L; 53.1 cu in (870 cc) 62 mm × 72 mm (2.4 in × 2.8 in), LJ462Q) and 1.1 L; 64.1 cu in (1,051 cc) 65.5 mm × 78 mm (2.58 in × 3.07 in), LJ465Q) versions thereof are still produced in China and see use in a wide number of vehicles.
    • F10D — 1.1 L (1,061 cc), 68.5 mm × 72 mm (2.70 in × 2.83 in). This is a four-cylinder version of the 0.8 L (796 cc) F8D.

G engineEdit

  • Suzuki G engine — 1.0–1.8 L I4
    • G10B — 1.0 L (993 cc), 72 mm × 61 mm (2.8 in × 2.4 in) SOHC 16-valve
    • G12B — 1.2 L (1,196 cc), 71 mm × 75.5 mm (2.80 in × 2.97 in) SOHC 16-valve
    • G13A — 1.3 L (1,324 cc), 74 mm × 77 mm (2.9 in × 3.0 in) SOHC 8-valve
    • G13B or G13K — 1.3 L (1,298 cc), 74.5 mm × 74 mm (2.93 in × 2.91 in) DOHC 16-valve
    • G13BA __ 1.3 L (1,298 cc), 74.5 mm × 74 mm (2.93 in × 2.91 in) SOHC 8-valve
    • G13BB — 1.3 L (1,298 cc), 74.5 mm × 74 mm (2.93 in × 2.91 in) SOHC 16-valve
    • G15A — 1.5 L (1,493 cc), 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in) SOHC 16-valve
    • G16A — 1.6 L (1,590 cc), 75 mm × 90 mm (3.0 in × 3.5 in) SOHC
    • G16B — 1.6 L (1,590 cc), 75 mm × 90 mm (3.0 in × 3.5 in) SOHC 16-valve
    • G16ID — 1.6 L (1,590 cc), 75 mm × 90 mm (3.0 in × 3.5 in) DOHC Multi-Point Injection
    • G18K — 1.8 L DOHC 16-valve
  • GM Daewoo D-TEC — 2.0 L (1,998 cc) DOHC 16-valve

J engineEdit

  • J18 — 1.8 L DOHC 16-valve FI
    • 1.8 L; 112.3 cu in (1,840 cc) [7]
    • 119 bhp (89 kW) at 6,200 rpm
    • 112 lb⋅ft (152 N⋅m) at 3,400 rpm
    • bore and stroke: 84 mm × 83 mm (3.3 in × 3.3 in)
  • J20 — 2.0 L DOHC 16-valve FI
    • 2.0 L; 121.7 cu in (1,995 cc) DOHC 16-valve[8]
    • bore and stroke: 84 mm × 90 mm (3.3 in × 3.5 in)
    • 9.7:1 compression ratio
    • Multipoint fuel injection
    • 127 hp (95 kW) at 6000 rpm
    • 134 lb⋅ft (182 N⋅m) at 3000 rpm
    • Aluminum cylinder head and engine block
    • Emissions: catalytic converter, exhaust gas recirculation, EVAP, PCV
      • 1999–2002 [Chevrolet Tracker[9][Suzuki Escudo]] aka Vitara, Sidekick
  • J20A
    • 2.0 L; 121.7 cu in (1,995 cc)
    • Coil on plug ignition
    • approximately 143 hp (107 kW) at 5,870 rpm - minor variations in reported power 141 to 145 hp (105 to 108 kW) depending on year and market
    • 189 N⋅m (139 lbf⋅ft) of torque at 3,500 rpm
  • J20B
    • 2.0 L; 121.7 cu in (1,995 cc)
    • Coil on plug ignition
    • VVT
    • 150 hp (152 PS; 112 kW) at 6200 rpm (With manual transmission, 148 hp (150 PS; 110 kW) with CVT)
    • 190 N⋅m (140 lbf⋅ft) at 4000 rpm
  • J23 — 2.3 L (2,290 cc) DOHC 16-valve FI
    • Bore and stroke: 90 mm × 90 mm (3.5 in × 3.5 in)
    • 9.3:1 compression ratio
    • 155 hp (116 kW) at 5400 rpm
    • 152 lb⋅ft (206 N⋅m) at 3000 rpm
  • J24B — 2.4 L (2,393 cc) DOHC 16-valve
    • Bore and stroke: 92 mm × 90 mm (3.6 in × 3.5 in)
    • 166 bhp (124 kW) at 6,000 rpm
    • 167 lb⋅ft (226 N⋅m) at 3,800 rpm
    • 180 bhp (134 kW) at 6,000 rpm - 185 bhp (138 kW) at 6,500 rpm
    • 170 lb⋅ft (230 N⋅m) at 4,000 rpm

K engineEdit

M engineEdit

Inline-sixesEdit

V6 enginesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • "How-to identify YOUR car, and where to find info on it". Team Swift. Retrieved April 14, 2006.[dead link]
  • "Suzuki Engines". Brisbane, Australia: Suzi Auto Services. Archived from the original on 2009-09-11.
  1. ^ Suzuki Service Manual: Carry L40/L41/L40V (manual), Hamamatsu, Japan: Suzuki Motor Co. Ltd., p. 26
  2. ^ Ozeki, Kazuo (2007). Suzuki Story: Small Cars, Big Ambitions. Tokyo: Miki Press. pp. 66–67. ISBN 978-4-89522-503-8.
  3. ^ a b "Suzuki Global. Splash Specifications". Archived from the original on 2013-08-18. Retrieved 2014-05-26.
  4. ^ "K10C engine specs". Motorparks.uk.
  5. ^ "軽自動車用の4気筒エンジン" [Kei four-cylinder engines]. a-design-for-life (in Japanese). 2014-09-27. Archived from the original on 2019-07-08.
  6. ^ Carry 1.0i Pick-Up (brochure) (in Indonesian), P.T. Indomobil Suzuki International, 2005, p. 2
  7. ^ Nötzli, Max, ed. (7 March 2002). Automobil Revue 2002 (in German and French). 97. Berne, Switzerland: Büchler Grafino AG. p. 551. ISBN 3-905386-02-X.
  8. ^ "J20 engine specs". media.gm. Retrieved 16 April 2014.
  9. ^ 1999 Tracker Service Manual GMT/99-JE-1
  10. ^ http://www.aeriostyle.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=9447
  11. ^ Nötzli, Max, ed. (7 March 2002). Automobil Revue 2002 (in German and French). 97. Berne, Switzerland: Büchler Grafino AG. p. 550. ISBN 3-905386-02-X.
  12. ^ "K14B发动机: 图片展示" [K14B engine: photo gallery] (in Chinese). China Chang'an Automobile Group. Archived from the original on 2011-09-12. Retrieved 2011-05-26.
  13. ^ http://www.suzuki.com.au/vehicles/hatch/swift-sport
  14. ^ http://www.globalsuzuki.com/automobile/lineup/ertiga/index.html
  15. ^ http://www.globalsuzuki.com/globalnews/2018/0705.html
  16. ^ https://www.globalsuzuki.com/automobile/lineup/carry/