List of Royal Australian Navy bases

The following is a list of current and former commissioned bases used by the Royal Australian Navy.

Current basesEdit

Naval facility Purpose State/Territory Location Period Notes
Fleet Base East Fleet base, depot, dockyard New South Wales Sydney 1788 – present Includes HMAS Kuttabul, HMAS Waterhen and Garden Island dockyard and berthing facilities
Fleet Base West (HMAS Stirling) Fleet base, depot Western Australia Garden Island 1978 – present Major West Coast base, submarine base
HMAS Albatross Naval air station New South Wales Nowra 1948 – present
HMAS Cairns Base Queensland Cairns 1974 – present Patrol boat, hydrography, and minor war vessels base
HMAS Cerberus Training facility Victoria Crib Point 1912 – 1921;
1921 – present
Formerly located at Williamstown
HMAS Coonawarra Base Northern Territory Darwin 1970 – present Former Naval Wireless Transmitting Station, now a patrol boat base
HMAS Creswell Training facility Jervis Bay Territory Jervis Bay 1958 – present Location of the Royal Australian Naval College
HMAS Harman Communications facility Australian Capital Territory Canberra 1943 – present A tri-service base
HMAS Kuttabul Administrative, logistical, training, accommodation New South Wales Sydney 1943 – present Administrative base for Fleet Base East
HMAS Moreton Administration Queensland Brisbane 2016 – present Administration and reserves
HMAS Penguin Depot, specialist training New South Wales Balmoral 1913 – 1942;
1943 – present
Location of Balmoral Naval Hospital, hydrographic school, diving school and medical school
HMAS Waterhen Base New South Wales Waverton 1962 – present Mine Warfare and Clearance Diving Headquarters, part of Fleet Base East
HMAS Watson Training facility New South Wales Watsons Bay 1945 – present Location of Maritime Warfare school

Former basesEdit

Former naval facility Former purpose Country
(if outside Australia)/
State/Territory
Location Period Notes
HMAS Assault Training facility New South Wales Port Stephens 1942 – 1945
HMAS Basilisk Depot Papua New Guinea Port Moresby 1942 – 1945;
1974 – 1983
HMAS Brisbane Depot Queensland Brisbane 1940 – 1942
HMAS Carpentaria Base Queensland Thursday Island 1945 – 1946
Administrative centre United Kingdom London 1966 – 1981
HMAS Commonwealth Administrative centre Japan Kure 1948 – 1956
HMAS Derwent Depot Tasmania Hobart 1940 – 1942
HMAS Encounter Depot South Australia Port Adelaide 1965 – 1994
HMAS Gilolo Depot Indonesia Halmahera Island 1945 – 1946
HMAS Huon Depot Tasmania Hobart 1942 – 1994
HMAS Kuranda Depot Queensland Cairns 1944 – 1945
HMAS Ladava Depot Papua New Guinea Milne Bay 1943 – 1945
HMAS Leeuwin Depot
Training facility
Western Australia Fremantle 1940 – 1986 Currently used by Australian Army, known as Leeuwin Barracks
HMAS Lonsdale Depot Victoria Port Melbourne 1940 – 1992
HMAS Lusair Depot Papua New Guinea Torokina 1945
HMAS Madang Depot Papua New Guinea Madang 1944 – 1946
HMAS Magnetic Depot Queensland Townsville 1942 – 1948
HMAS Maitland Depot New South Wales Newcastle 1940 – 1946
HMAS Melville Depot Northern Territory Darwin 1940 – 1975 Replaced by HMAS Coonawarra
HMAS Mindari Training facility New South Wales Woolloomooloo 1945 – 1948
HMAS Moreton Depot Queensland Brisbane 1942 – 1994
HMAS Nirimba Naval air station
Training facility
New South Wales Quakers Hill 1953 – 1955;
1956 – 1994
Now a campus of the Western Sydney University (2007)
HMAS Platypus Submarine base New South Wales Neutral Bay 1967 – 1999
HMAS Rushcutter Depot New South Wales Rushcutters Bay 1901 – 1979 Commissioned as HMAS Rushcutter on 1 August 1940
HMAS Seeadler Depot Papua New Guinea Los Negros Island 1950 Name of base changed to HMAS Tarangau.[1]
HMAS Tarangau Depot Papua New Guinea Dreger Harbour near Finschhafen,
Los Negros Island
1946–1950;
1950–1974
Base at Dreger closed in 1950, and the base name and its personnel and equipment transferred to the former HMAS Seeadler at Manus Island.[2]
HMAS Torrens Depot South Australia Port Adelaide 1940 – 1964
HMAS Waratah Administrative centre United States of America Washington, D.C. 1966 – 1980

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "MANUS BASE TO BE CALLED H.M.A.S. TARANGAU". The Canberra Times. 21 March 1950. p. 4. Retrieved 24 October 2011 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ "MANUS BASE TO BE CALLED H.M.A.S. TARANGAU". The Canberra Times. 21 March 1950. p. 4. Retrieved 24 October 2011 – via National Library of Australia.

ReferencesEdit

  • Stevens, D. (2001). The Royal Australian Navy – A History. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195555422.