List of Premier League seasons

The Premier League is an English professional league for association football clubs. At the top of the English football league system, it is the country's primary football competition and is contested by 20 clubs. Seasons run from August to May, with teams playing 38 matches each, totalling 380 matches in the season. Most games are played on Saturdays and Sundays, with games also played on certain weekday evenings.

Premier League
Founded20 February 1992
CountryEngland
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Number of teams20
Level on pyramid1
Relegation toEFL Championship
International cup(s)UEFA Champions League
UEFA Europa League
Current championsLiverpool (1st title)
(2019–20)
Most championshipsManchester United (13 titles)
2020–21 Premier League

The competition was formed in February 1992 following the decision of clubs in the Football League First Division to break away from The Football League, in order to take advantage of a lucrative television rights deal. Teams competing in the Premier League may qualify for the UEFA Champions League or UEFA Europa League on virtue of league positions. The competition adopts a promotion and relegation system with the Football League which comes into place at the end of each season. Since the inaugural season in 1992–93, 45 teams have competed in the Premier League. At the end of the 1994–95 season, the league was reduced from 22 teams to 20.

Seven clubs have won the title: Manchester United (13 times), Chelsea (5), Manchester City (4), Arsenal (3), Blackburn Rovers, Leicester City and Liverpool; Manchester United was the first club to win the league three consecutive seasons twice (1998–99 to 2000–01 and 2006–07 to 2008–09) and Arsenal was the only team to go an entire season without a single defeat in 2003–04. The record number of points accumulated by a team is 100 by Manchester City, who won the Premier League in 2017–18. Norwich have been relegated the most times (5) while Derby County accumulated the lowest ever points total with 11 in the 2007–08 season. 16 top goalscorers from 11 different clubs have been awarded the Premier League Golden Boot. Andy Cole and Alan Shearer have both scored 34 goals in a 42-game season – the most in a Premier League season. Mohamed Salah holds the record in a 38-game season with 32. Dutchman Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink was the first foreigner to win the award outright in 2000–01 having shared the accolade with Dwight Yorke of Trinidad and Tobago in 1998–99.

History

Champions

"They've deserved to win the league and now, having opened the door, if they show the same hunger they have shown this year, there's no saying what they can achieve."

Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson on his players winning the Premier League in May 1993.[1]

In the inaugural season of the Premier League Manchester United finished 10 points clear of Aston Villa to win their first league championship in over 26 years.[2] The club successfully retained the title in 1993–94, leading the table after beating Aston Villa 2–1 in the third gameweek.[3] Manchester United also completed a league and cup double, beating Chelsea 4–0 in the FA Cup final. Blackburn Rovers under the investment of owner Jack Walker and manager Kenny Dalglish won their first championship since 1913–14 on the final day of the 1994–95 season.[4] Despite Blackburn losing to Liverpool, Manchester United – in second place and two points behind the leaders before kick-off had failed to capitalise on the result, drawing at West Ham United.[5] Manchester United however regained the Premier League in 1995–96 after much scrutiny over the inexperience of the first team at the beginning of the season.[6] Newcastle United who held a 12-point lead at the top in January 1996 were pegged back in the following weeks before Manchester United moved in front at the end of March.[7]

Manchester United retained the league in 1996–97 but were overhauled by Arsenal in the final ten weeks of the 1997–98 season, finishing second.[8][9] Arsenal, managed by Arsène Wenger in his first full season at the club also beat Newcastle 2–0 in the FA Cup final to win the trophy and accomplish a double.[10] They however failed to retain both trophies as Manchester United pipped Arsenal on the final day of the league season, winning the Premier League as well as defeating the holders in a FA Cup semi-final replay.[11] United won the league for two successive seasons: in 1999–2000 ending the season 18 points in front and 2000–01 by 10.[12] After four seasons without a trophy, Arsenal again completed a league and cup double in 2001–02 remarkably scoring in every single Premier League match.[13] The title the following season was won by Manchester United, with striker Ruud van Nistelrooy scoring 25 goals in 38 league matches.[14]

In the summer of 2003, Chelsea were taken over by businessman Roman Abramovich and despite the club spending over £100m on new players, the 2003–04 champions were Arsenal, who became the first Premier League club to win the league without defeat.[15][16] Chelsea's failure to finish first culminated in managerial changes: coach Claudio Ranieri was sacked and subsequently replaced with Portuguese José Mourinho.[17] The club won the league in 2004–05, 12 points ahead of runners-up Arsenal, scoring 72 goals and conceding 15 in the process.[18][19] Chelsea won a second successive Premier League title in 2005–06 before Manchester United became the third different club to win the league in four seasons in 2006–07.[20][21] Despite Arsenal leading the division for much of the 2007–08 season, Manchester United retained the championship on the final day of the season and won their eleventh Premier League title in 2008–09 after much competition from Liverpool.[22][23] Chelsea reclaimed the league in 2009–10, scoring a record 103 goals and won the FA Cup to end the season as double winners.[24] In May 2011, Manchester United won their 12th Premier League title and a record 19th after drawing away to Blackburn Rovers.[25]

Promotion and Relegation

Nottingham Forest were the first team relegated from the Premier League in the 1992–93 season, losing 0–2 at home to Sheffield United on 1 May 1993.[26] They were joined by Middlesbrough and Crystal Palace, with the latter club relegated on goal difference. Newcastle United and West Ham United were both automatically promoted from the First Division while Swindon Town triumphed in the playoffs.

Blackburn Rovers have been the only Premier League champions to be relegated from the league, in 1998–99 and 2011–12.

Top goalscorer

 
Thierry Henry has received the most Golden Boot awards with four.

The top goalscorer in the Premier League at the end of each season is awarded the Premier League Golden Boot, known for sponsorship reasons as the Barclays Golden Boot. The first recipient was Teddy Sheringham of Tottenham Hotspur, who scored 21 goals in 40 games for the club as well as an additional goal for Nottingham Forest on the opening day of the season.[27] Andy Cole scored 34 goals for Newcastle United in 1993–94 before Alan Shearer won three consecutive awards: twice for Blackburn Rovers including their league-winning season and once for Newcastle United in 1996–97. Chris Sutton, Michael Owen and Dion Dublin of Blackburn Rovers, Liverpool and Coventry City respectively were the joint recipients of the Golden Boot the following season, with 18 goals apiece. Owen again shared the accolade, scoring 18 goals in 1998–99 with Manchester United striker Dwight Yorke and Leeds forward Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink. In 1999–2000, the award was given to Kevin Phillips of newly promoted Sunderland, scoring 30 goals in 36 games.[28] At a strike rate of 0.83, he was also awarded the European Golden Shoe.[28]

Hasselbaink was the winner in 2000–01, scoring 23 goals for Chelsea in 35 appearances.[29] Thierry Henry of Arsenal picked up the prize a year later with 24 goals and Manchester United striker Ruud van Nistelrooy was the awardee in 2002–03, scoring one more than the previous season's tally.[30][31] Henry picked up three successive Golden Boots in 2003–04, 2004–05 and 2005–06 scoring 30, 25 and 27 goals respectively.[32] Chelsea striker Didier Drogba was the top goalscorer in 2006–07 with 20 goals and Manchester United midfielder Cristiano Ronaldo contributed to his team's success in 2007–08, scoring 31 goals in 34 league games; a strike rate of 0.91.[33][34] Nicolas Anelka of Chelsea was the recipient in 2008–09 with 18 goals before his fellow strike partner Drogba won his second Golden Boot the following season with 29 goals.[35][36] Both Carlos Tevez and Dimitar Berbatov of Manchester City and Manchester United respectively each won their first Golden Boot at the end of the 2010–11 season, scoring 20 goals.[37]

Seasons

Key
  League champions won domestic double
  League champions won domestic treble
  Team qualified as UCL winners
# Team qualified as UEL winners
Season Champions Champions League[a] UEFA Cup / Europa League[b] Relegated Promoted Player(s) Goals[c]
Europe[d] Top scorer(s)
1992–93 Manchester United Aston Villa
Norwich City
Crystal Palace
Middlesbrough
Nottingham Forest
Newcastle United
West Ham United
Swindon Town
Teddy Sheringham 22[e]
1993–94 Manchester United   Blackburn Rovers
Newcastle United
Sheffield United
Oldham Athletic
Swindon Town
Crystal Palace
Nottingham Forest
Leicester City
Andy Cole 34
1994–95 Blackburn Rovers Manchester United
Nottingham Forest
Liverpool
Leeds United
Crystal Palace
Norwich City
Leicester City
Ipswich Town
Middlesbrough
Bolton Wanderers
Alan Shearer 34
1995–96 Manchester United   Newcastle United
Aston Villa
Arsenal
Manchester City
Queens Park Rangers
Bolton Wanderers
Sunderland
Derby County
Leicester City
Alan Shearer 31
1996–97 Manchester United Newcastle United Arsenal
Liverpool
Aston Villa
Sunderland
Middlesbrough[f]
Nottingham Forest
Bolton Wanderers
Barnsley
Crystal Palace
Alan Shearer 25
1997–98 Arsenal   Manchester United Liverpool
Leeds United
Blackburn Rovers
Aston Villa
Bolton Wanderers
Barnsley
Crystal Palace
Nottingham Forest
Middlesbrough
Charlton Athletic
Dion Dublin
Michael Owen
Chris Sutton
18
1998–99 Manchester United  [g] Arsenal
Chelsea
Leeds United Charlton Athletic
Blackburn Rovers
Nottingham Forest
Sunderland
Bradford City
Watford
Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink
Michael Owen
Dwight Yorke
18
1999–2000 Manchester United Arsenal
Leeds United
Liverpool Wimbledon
Sheffield Wednesday
Watford
Charlton Athletic
Manchester City
Ipswich Town
Kevin Phillips 30[h]
2000–01 Manchester United Arsenal
Liverpool
Leeds United
Ipswich Town
Chelsea
Manchester City
Coventry City
Bradford City
Fulham
Blackburn Rovers
Bolton Wanderers
Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink 23
2001–02 Arsenal   Liverpool
Manchester United
Newcastle United
Leeds United Ipswich Town
Derby County
Leicester City
Manchester City
West Bromwich Albion
Birmingham City
Thierry Henry 24
2002–03 Manchester United Arsenal
Newcastle United
Chelsea
Blackburn Rovers West Ham United
West Bromwich Albion
Sunderland
Portsmouth
Leicester City
Wolverhampton Wanderers
Ruud van Nistelrooy 25
2003–04 Arsenal Chelsea
Manchester United
Liverpool
Newcastle United Leicester City
Leeds United
Wolverhampton Wanderers
Norwich City
West Bromwich Albion
Crystal Palace
Thierry Henry 30[i]
2004–05 Chelsea Arsenal
Manchester United
Everton
Liverpool 
Bolton Wanderers
Middlesbrough
Crystal Palace
Norwich City
Southampton
Sunderland
Wigan Athletic
West Ham United
Thierry Henry 25[j]
2005–06 Chelsea Manchester United
Liverpool
Arsenal
Tottenham Hotspur
Blackburn Rovers
Birmingham City
West Bromwich Albion
Sunderland
Reading
Sheffield United
Watford
Thierry Henry 27
2006–07 Manchester United Chelsea
Liverpool
Arsenal
Tottenham Hotspur
Everton
Bolton Wanderers
Sheffield United
Charlton Athletic
Watford
Sunderland
Birmingham City
Derby County
Didier Drogba 20
2007–08 Manchester United Chelsea
Arsenal
Liverpool
Everton Reading
Birmingham City
Derby County
West Bromwich Albion
Stoke City
Hull City
Cristiano Ronaldo 31[k]
2008–09 Manchester United Liverpool
Chelsea
Arsenal
Everton
Aston Villa
Newcastle United
Middlesbrough
West Bromwich Albion
Wolverhampton Wanderers
Birmingham City
Burnley
Nicolas Anelka 19
2009–10 Chelsea   Manchester United
Arsenal
Tottenham Hotspur
Manchester City
Aston Villa
Burnley
Hull City
Portsmouth[l]
Newcastle United
West Bromwich Albion
Blackpool
Didier Drogba 29
2010–11 Manchester United Chelsea
Arsenal
Manchester City
Tottenham Hotspur Birmingham City
Blackpool
West Ham United
Queens Park Rangers
Norwich City
Swansea City
Dimitar Berbatov
Carlos Tevez
20
2011–12 Manchester City Manchester United
Arsenal
Chelsea 
Tottenham Hotspur
Newcastle United
Bolton Wanderers
Blackburn Rovers
Wolverhampton Wanderers
Reading
Southampton
West Ham United
Robin van Persie 30
2012–13 Manchester United Manchester City
Chelsea
Arsenal
Tottenham Hotspur Wigan Athletic
Reading
Queens Park Rangers
Cardiff City
Hull City
Crystal Palace
Robin van Persie 26
2013–14 Manchester City Liverpool
Chelsea
Arsenal
Everton
Tottenham Hotspur
Norwich City
Fulham
Cardiff City
Leicester City
Burnley
Queens Park Rangers
Luis Suárez 31 [m]
2014–15 Chelsea Manchester City
Arsenal
Manchester United
Tottenham Hotspur
Liverpool
Southampton
Hull City
Burnley
Queens Park Rangers
Bournemouth
Watford
Norwich City
Sergio Agüero 26
2015–16 Leicester City Arsenal
Tottenham Hotspur
Manchester City
Manchester United
Southampton
West Ham United
Aston Villa
Norwich City
Newcastle United
Burnley
Middlesbrough
Hull City
Harry Kane 25[55]
2016–17 Chelsea Tottenham Hotspur
Manchester City
Liverpool
Manchester United#
Arsenal
Everton
Sunderland
Middlesbrough
Hull City
Newcastle United
Brighton & Hove Albion
Huddersfield Town
Harry Kane 29[55]
2017–18 Manchester City Manchester United
Tottenham Hotspur
Liverpool
Chelsea
Arsenal
Burnley
Swansea City
Stoke City
West Bromwich Albion
Wolverhampton Wanderers
Cardiff City
Fulham
Mohamed Salah 32[56]
2018–19 Manchester City   Liverpool
Chelsea
Tottenham Hotspur
Arsenal
Manchester United
Wolverhampton Wanderers
Cardiff City
Fulham
Huddersfield Town
Norwich City
Sheffield United
Aston Villa
Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang
Sadio Mané
Mohamed Salah
22[57]
2019–20 Liverpool Manchester City
Manchester United
Chelsea
Leicester City
Tottenham Hotspur
Arsenal[n]
Bournemouth
Watford
Norwich City
Leeds United
West Bromwich Albion
Fulham
Jamie Vardy 23[59]

Notes

  1. ^ The Champions League was initially contested by domestic league champions of nations affiliated to UEFA. From the 1997–98 UEFA Champions League season the competition was expanded to include eight domestic league runners-up selected by a coefficient system. A preliminary spot was awarded to the third place team in the Premier League starting from the 1998–99 Premier League season for the 1999–2000 UEFA Champions League and an increase in coefficient points in 2001, first in effect for the 2001–02 Premier League season ahead of the 2002–03 UEFA Champions League, resulted in an extra preliminary spot being awarded to the team finishing fourth in the Premier League. The 2008–09 Premier League season before the 2009–10 UEFA Champions League was the first to see the top three Premier League teams automatically qualify for the group stages of the competition, with the fourth-placed team participating in a play-off. As of the 2017–18 Premier League season ahead of the 2018–19 UEFA Champions League, the top four Premier League teams all automatically qualify for the group stages.[38][39][40][41][42]
  2. ^ Originally referred to as the UEFA Cup, the competition was revamped to the UEFA Europa League from the start of the 2009–10 season.[43] Since the 2001–02 Premier League season ahead of the 2002–03 UEFA Cup, the fifth-placed team in the Premier League automatically qualifies for the competition. The winners of the FA Cup and League Cup also qualify. If the League Cup winner qualifies for Europe through their league place, the next best-placed team in the league takes the European spot. Prior to the 2014–15 Premier League season ahead of the 2015–16 UEFA Europa League, if the winner of the FA Cup had already qualified for European competition, their place would be transferred to the runner-up. However, starting in 2015, if the FA Cup winner has already qualified for European competition, the next best-placed team in the Premier League will take their place (same as the League Cup).[44][45]
  3. ^ Goals only scored in the Premier League
  4. ^ In addition to the Premier League champions, teams who also qualify for Europe by virtue of their league position, not those who qualify by other means such as winning the FA Cup, Football League Cup or via the Fair Play initiative. Two abolished competitions, the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup and the less prestigious UEFA Intertoto Cup, are excluded.
  5. ^ Sheringham joined Tottenham Hotspur in August 1992 for £2.1 million. In the league, he scored one goal for Nottingham Forest (against Liverpool on the opening weekend of the season) and 21 for Tottenham Hotspur.[46][27]
  6. ^ Middlesbrough were deducted three points and fined £50,000 by the Premier League after failing to attend the scheduled fixture against Blackburn Rovers in January 1997.[47]
  7. ^ As well as winning the league and FA Cup, Manchester United beat Bayern Munich 2–1 in the final of the UEFA Champions League to complete a European treble.[48]
  8. ^ Kevin Phillips won the European Golden Shoe for the 1999–2000 season, scoring 30 league goals.[49]
  9. ^ Thierry Henry won the European Golden Shoe for the 2003–04 season, scoring 30 goals.[50]
  10. ^ Thierry Henry was the joint holder of the European Golden Shoe with Diego Forlán who also scored 25 goals.[51]
  11. ^ Cristiano Ronaldo was awarded the European Golden Shoe for the 2007–08 season, scoring 31 goals.[52]
  12. ^ Portsmouth were deducted ten points after entering administration in February 2010.[53]
  13. ^ Luis Suárez shared the European Golden Shoe for the 2013–14 season with Cristiano Ronaldo, both scoring 31 goals.[54]
  14. ^ If Chelsea had won the 2020 FA Cup Final, the place in the 2020–21 UEFA Europa League reserved for the FA Cup winners would have gone to the seventh-placed team in the Premier League.[58]

References

General

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  • "Barclays Premier League Table". Retrieved 6 January 2012.
  • "Who qualifies to play in Europe?". Retrieved 6 January 2012.
  • Ross, James M. (7 November 2008). "English League Leading Goalscorers". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 18 November 2008.

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Specific

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External links