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Ukrainian temple of the RUNVira in Spring Glen, New York.

Modern paganism, also known a "contemporary" or "neopagan", encompasses a wide range of religious groups and individuals. These may include old occult groups, those that follow a New Age approach, those that try to reconstruct old ethnic religions, and followers of the pagan religion of Wicca.

Contents

Early movementsEdit

WitchcraftEdit

Wicca originated in 1940s Britain and became the mainstream of Neopaganism in the United States in the 1970s. There are two core traditions of Wicca which originated in Britain, Gardnerian and Alexandrian, which are sometimes referred to as British Traditional Wicca. From these two arose several other variant traditions. Wicca has also inspired a great number of other witchcraft traditions in Britain, Europe and the United States, most of which base their beliefs and practices on Wicca. Many movements are influenced by the Movement of the Goddess, and New Age and feminist worldviews.

WiccaEdit

 
A Wiccan ritual altar.

OtherEdit

New Age, eclectic or syncreticEdit

EthnicEdit

GermanicEdit

Heathenism (also Heathenry, or Greater Heathenry), is a blanket term for the whole Germanic Neopagan movement. Various currents and denominations have arisen over the years within it.

CelticEdit

 
The Druid Order Ceremony at Tower Hill, London on the Spring Equinox of 2010

ItalicEdit

SlavicEdit

 
The community of the Union of Slavic Native Belief Communities celebrating Mokosh, Russia.

Other EuropeanEdit

 
Ritual at the Temple of Garni, in Armenia.
 
Members of the Lithuanian Romuva perform a ceremony in front of the Monument of Gediminas, in Vilnius, Lithuania.

Turkic-MongolicEdit

 
Tengrist temple of the Sülde Tngri in the town of Uxin Banner in Inner Mongolia, China.

CanarianEdit

SemiticEdit

KemeticEdit

MesopotamianEdit

  • Temple of Sumer[1]
  • Gateways to Babylon[2]

MesoamericanEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit