List of Gwar members

Gwar is an American heavy metal band from Richmond, Virginia. Formed in 1985, the group's core thematic and visual concept revolves around an elaborate science fiction-themed mythology, which portrays each of the band members as barbaric interplanetary warriors. The band's original lineup featured vocalist Ben Eubanks (as the character of Johnny Slutman), guitarists Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus), Russ Bahorsky (Mr. Magico) and Steve Douglas (Jaws of Death), bassist Chris Bopst (Balsac), and drummer Sean Sumner (Hans Sphincter). As of Brockie's death in 2014, Gwar currently features no original members, with a lineup of rhythm guitarist Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death, since 1988), drummer Brad Roberts (Jizmak Da Gusha, since 1989), lead guitarist Brent Purgason (Pustulus Maximus, since 2012), lead vocalist Mike Bishop (Blöthar the Berserker, since 2014; previously a bassist for the band), and bassist Casey Orr (Beefcake the Mighty, most recently since 2019).

Former lineups of Gwar performing live in 2004 (top) and 2008 (bottom).

HistoryEdit

1985–1987Edit

Gwar was originally formed as a "joke band" under the name Gwaaarrrgghhlllgh by members of Richmond-based hardcore punk group Death Piggy, serving as the opening act at the band's live shows.[1] According to co-founder Dave Brockie, early performances featured "a mish-mash of Death Piggy and Alter Natives musicians".[2] Gwaaarrrgghhlllgh debuted on March 25, 1985 in its original form, with the "first real GWAR show with plot characters" following in October.[3] The lineup for the first two shows featured lead vocalist Ben Eubanks (Johnny Slutman), guitarists Brockie (Oderus Urungus), Russ Bahorsky (Mr. Magico) and Steve Douglas (Jaws of Death), bassist Chris Bopst (Balsac) and drummer Sean Sumner.[4][5] Eubanks, Bahorsky, Douglas and Sumner all left after the first two shows.[6]

After starting out as a guitarist for the band, Dave Brockie took over lead vocals for Gwar in 1986.

Returning later in 1985, Gwar featured a lineup of Brockie and Bopst alongside new vocalist Joe Annaruma (Joey Slutman), guitarists Greg Ottenger (Cornelius Carnage) and Ron Curry (Stephen Sphincter), and drummer Jim Thomson (Hans Sphincter); this core lineup was often joined live by Hunter Jackson (Techno Destructo) and Mike Delaney (The Executioner) on backup vocals.[6][7] Early demo recordings from this lineup were eventually issued as part of the 2004 collection Let There Be Gwar.[8] In 1986, Annaruma left after allegedly "trying to fuck Techno's girlfriend, The Temptress", with Brockie taking over the role of Gwar's lead vocalist.[9] The band played one show with guitarist Tim Harriss playing "an unnamed character with a big headdress and a spiked tail", before settling on a two-guitarist lineup.[6]

1987–1992Edit

In early 1987, Ottinger, Bopst and Thomson all left Gwar, after their main band Alter Natives signed with SST Records.[3][10] Hunter Jackson, founder of Slave Pit Inc. and designer of the band's original costumes, had also moved away, which led to the introduction of Dave Musel in his place.[11] Brockie, along with satellite members Don Drakulich (Sleazy P. Martini), Mike Delaney (The Executioner) and Chuck Varga (The Sexecutioner), then rebuilt the band with the addition of guitarist Dewey Rowell and drummer Rob Mosby from local group White Cross, as well as returning guitarist Steve Douglas and new bassist Mike Bishop.[6][11][12] New characters were also created – Flattus Maximus for Rowell, Balsac the Jaws of Death for Douglas, Beefcake the Mighty for Bishop and Nippleus Erectus for Mosby.[13]

The lineup of Brockie, Rowell, Douglas, Bishop and Mosby recorded Gwar's debut album Hell-O, which was released in 1988.[14] During a subsequent tour, Douglas left the band due to personal differences with Bishop, as well as his continued presence in multiple bands.[15] The guitarist was replaced by Mike Derks, who took over the character of Balsac the Jaws of Death. The group continued touring until early 1989,[16] when Mosby also left following a string of "sexual indiscretions" and creative differences.[15][17] He was replaced by Pete Luchter (Lee Beato), who remained for a short time before leaving after being subjected to what Brockie described as "a brutal hazing ritual".[18]

After the departures of Hosby followed by Luchter, Gwar completed a 1989 tour with former drummer Lee Thomson, this time as the character Hans Orifice.[17] Brad Roberts took over later in the year as Jizmak da Gusha, in time for the recording of the band's second album Scumdogs of the Universe.[14] After a lengthy touring cycle, Rowell left in 1991 and was not immediately replaced.[19] Instead, Derks was aided for the recording of America Must Be Destroyed by session guitarists Tim Harriss and Brian Fechino, and for the start of the subsequent touring cycle by Barry Ward.[20]

The role of Flattus Maximus, lead guitarist, changed many times throughout the 1990s and 2000s.

1992–2011Edit

Following the release and initial promotion of America Must Be Destroyed, a permanent replacement for Dewey Rowell was found in Pete Lee, who took on the vacated role of Flattus Maximus.[21] During the recording of the band's next album This Toilet Earth in April 1993,[19] Lee was shot in the stomach when he got out of the band's van to investigate a robbery going on in front of them. He eventually recovered and returned to the band, several months later.[21] Shortly thereafter, in late 1993,[19] Bishop left Gwar, citing an anxiety disorder and interpersonal problems with bandmates, especially Lee, as reasons for his departure.[21] Casey Orr took his place in February 1994.[19]

With Lee and Orr in the lineup, Gwar released Ragnarök in 1995 and Carnival of Chaos in 1997, before Lee was forced to leave at the end of 1997 due to continuing health problems caused by the 1993 shooting.[21] After Orr also left early the next year to return home to Texas, the remaining trio of Brockie, Derks and Roberts began to work on writing material for the band's next release We Kill Everything, before Bishop and Tim Harriss both returned to the group for the recording of the album.[19]

Before the release of We Kill Everything, Orr returned to Gwar and Harriss was replaced by Zach Blair.[19] Just one album came from the lineup, 2001's Violence Has Arrived, before both Blair and Orr left in the summer of 2002, and were replaced in September by Cory Smoot and Todd Evans, respectively.[22] After releasing two studio albums – War Party in 2004 and Beyond Hell in 2006 – Evans left Gwar in April 2008 to focus on his other group Mobile Deathcamp, in which he performs lead vocals and his favoured instrument, guitar.[23] Two weeks later, it was announced by guitarist Mike Derks that Casey Orr would return in Evans' place for his third tenure with the group.[24]

Since 2011Edit

After a three-year spell spawning the albums Lust in Space and Bloody Pit of Horror, bassist Casey Orr left Gwar for a third time to focus on his bands in his home state of Texas, primarily Rigor Mortis.[25] In October, Jamison Land was announced as the new Beefcake the Mighty.[26] The following month, however, lead guitarist Cory Smoot was found dead during a North American tour.[27] The cause of death was revealed in December to have been coronary thrombosis, caused by his pre-existing coronary artery disease.[28] The group continued the tour following Smoot's death, with Brockie explaining that "Although the great temptation would be to return home, curl into a fetal position, and mourn, we can't do that. First off, Cory wouldn't want that. He would want us to go on and would be pissed if we didn't. Plus we know the fans don't want us to quit. They are going to want a chance to come to grips with their loss, and there is no better place to do that than at a Gwar show."[29]

Former bassist Mike Bishop returned in 2014 as Blöthar the Berserker, taking over lead vocals following Brockie's death.

Gwar returned to its five-piece lineup in August 2012 with the addition of Cannabis Corpse guitarist Brent Purgason, who took on the new character of Pustulus Maximus after Flattus was retired following Smoot's death.[30] He debuted on Battle Maximus, which was released the following September.[31] The album proved to be the last for Gwar's sole constant member Dave Brockie, who died on March 23, 2014.[32] It was announced later that the cause of the singer's death was an accidental heroin overdose.[33]

In August 2014, Gwar returned at its annual Gwar-B-Q festival, performing with former bassist Mike Bishop in the new character of Blöthar the Berserker on lead vocals.[34] Bishop was later joined by Kim Dylla, serving as another new character called Vulvatron, as the band's second lead vocalist.[35] She lasted only a few months, however, and it was announced the following May that she had left the band, with Purgason claiming that "Kim did a great job, but we wanted to go a different direction with the Vulvatron character. You will absolutely see more of Vulvatron in the future, just not portrayed by Kim. There is no ill will, no acrimony, and no drama ... it just isn't what we needed in the character."[36]

Gwar released its first album since Brockie's death and Bishop's return, The Blood of Gods, in October 2017.[37] In February 2019, bassist Land announced that he had left Gwar to return to his home state of Kentucky, in order to "spend more time with family and to focus on [his] driving career".[38] When the band announced its Use Your Collusion Tour a few months later, it was revealed that Casey Orr had returned for his fourth tenure as Beefcake the Mighty.[39]

Core band membersEdit

CurrentEdit

Image Name Years active Character(s) Instruments Release contributions
Mike Bishop
  • 1987–1993
  • 1998–1999
  • 2014–present
  • lead vocals, occasional bass (since 2014)
  • bass, backing and occasional lead vocals (1987–93 and 1998–99)
Mike Derks 1988–present Balsac the Jaws of Death
  • rhythm guitar
  • backing vocals
all Gwar releases from The Next Mutation (1989) onwards
Brad Roberts 1989–present Jizmak da Gusha
  • drums
  • percussion
Casey Orr
  • 1994–1997
  • 1999–2002
  • 2008–2011
  • 2019–present
Beefcake the Mighty
  • bass
  • backing and occasional lead vocals
Brent Purgason 2012–present Pustulus Maximus
  • lead guitar
  • backing vocals
all Gwar releases from The 3rd Annual Gwar-B-Q 2012 (2013) onwards

FormerEdit

Image Name Years active Character(s) Instruments Release contributions
Dave Brockie 1985–2014 (until his death) Oderus Urungus
  • lead vocals (from 1986)
  • guitar, backing vocals (1985–86)
all Gwar releases from Hell-O (1988) to The 4th Annual Gwar-B-Q 2013 (2014)
Chris Bopst 1985–1987 Balsac
  • bass
  • backing vocals
Let There Be Gwar (2004)
Steve Douglas
  • 1985

  • 1987–1988
  • Jaws of Death (1985)
  • Balsac the Jaws of Death (1987–88)
  • guitar
  • backing vocals
Hell-O (1988)
Ben Eubanks 1985 Johnny Slutman lead vocals none – two live performances only
Russ Bahorsky Mr. Magico
  • guitar
  • backing vocals
Sean Sumner 1985 (died 1996) none
  • drums
  • percussion
Jim Thomson
  • 1985–1987
  • 1989
  • drums
  • percussion
Let There Be Gwar (2004)
Greg Ottinger 1985–1987 Cornelius Carnage
  • lead and rhythm guitars
  • backing vocals
Ron Curry Stephen Sphincter
Joe Annaruma 1985–1986 Joey Slutman lead vocals Let There Be Gwar (2004) – four tracks only
Tim Harriss
  • 1986
  • 1991
  • 1998–1999
Flattus Maximus
  • lead guitar
  • backing vocals
We Kill Everything (1999)
Dewey Rowell 1987–1991 Flattus Maximus
  • guitar
  • backing vocals
all Gwar releases from Hell-O (1988) to Tour de Scum (1992)
Rob Mosby 1987–1989 Nippleus Erectus
  • drums
  • percussion
Hell-O (1988)
Pete Luchter 1989 Lee Beato none – live performances only
Pete Lee 1992–1998 Flattus Maximus
  • lead guitar
  • backing vocals
all Gwar releases from This Toilet Earth (1994) to The Dawn of the Day of the Night of the Penguins (1998)
Zach Blair 1999–2002 (plus session guest 2013)
  • You're All Worthless and Weak (2001)
  • Violence Has Arrived (2001)
  • Blood Drive 2002 (2002)
  • Battle Maximus (2013) – guest appearance on six tracks
Cory Smoot 2002–2011
(until his death)
  • lead guitar
  • backing and occasional lead vocals
all Gwar releases from War Party (2004) to Electile Disfunction '08 (2013)
Todd Evans 2002–2008 (plus session guest 2013) Beefcake the Mighty
  • bass
  • backing and occasional lead vocals
  • guitar (2013)
  • all Gwar releases from War Party (2004) to Beyond Hell Live (2007)
  • Battle Maximus (2013) – guest appearance on two tracks
Jamison Land 2011–2019
  • bass
  • backing vocals
  • The 3rd Annual Gwar-B-Q 2012 (2013)
  • Battle Maximus (2013)
  • The 4th Annual Gwar-B-Q 2013 (2014)
  • The Blood of Gods (2017)
Kim Dylla 2014–2015 Vulvatron co-lead vocals none – live performances only

Supporting personnelEdit

CurrentEdit

Image Name Year joined Character(s) Details
Don Drakulich
  • 1986–1996
  • 2007–2009
  • 2014

  • 2017–present
Drakulich became a member of Gwar in 1986, contributing special effects and working on elements of the group's costume design and production.[40] He appears onstage as Gwar's manager Sleazy P. Martini (after briefly replacing Hunter Jackson as Techno Destructo), has toured for a number of years, and has appeared on various releases.[41]
Scott Krahl 1987–present Cock & Balls Slave Krahl joined the Gwar collective in 1987 and has worked in several creative roles since joining.[42]
Bob Gorman
  • 1988–2000
  • 2001–2002
  • 2014–present
  • Muzzle Slave
  • Bone Snapper
Gorman first started working with Gwar and Slave Pit Inc. in 1988, before becoming a full-time member two years later and working in a wide range of creative and onstage roles.[43] In recent years, Gorman has returned to Gwar live shows as the regular character Bone Snapper, and has performed vocals on recent releases.[44]
Matt Maguire
  • 1991-2000
  • 2001–2002
  • 2007–present
  • Mattron
  • MX2
  • Sawborg Destructo
Maguire has been a member of the Slave Pit since 1991 (with a few breaks to focus on other projects), debuting on Gwar tours in 1992 and becoming the band's stage manager in 1996.[45] He has played many characters and gone under a number of names, including Mattron,[46] MX2,[47] and most recently Sawborg Destructo.[48]

FormerEdit

Image Name Years active Character(s) Details
Hunter Jackson
  • 1985–1986
  • 1987–2000
  • Techno Destructo
  • Scroda Moon
Jackson, a costume designer, was a co-founder of Slave Pit Inc. and a member of the original Gwar lineup as the character of Techno Destructo.[49] He left in late 1986 after moving to Detroit, Michigan but returned around a year later,[3] remaining with the group until moving away again in 2000.[22] He has also played Scroda Moon.[50]
Mike Delaney
  • 1985–1987
  • 1993–1994
  • The Executioner (1985–86)
  • Cardinal Syn (1986–87)
Delaney was one of the original members of the creative group behind Gwar, helping to produce stage props and sometimes performing with the band. He originally played the character of the Executioner, but when Chuck Varga joined and became the Sexecutioner, Delaney changed to Cardinal Syn. He would later return in the mid-1990s.[6]
Heather Broome 1985–1986
  • Gwar Woman (1985–86)
  • The Temptress (1986)
Broome was the first person to play the Gwar Woman character, playing at early live shows during the band's first year and becoming the Temptress upon the addition of a second female member, Colette Miller.[6]
Dave Musel 1986–1999 Müsel After Hunter Jackson left in 1986, the band brought in Dave Musel as its new primary costume designer.[11] He initially played a number of characters onstage, before settling into a primarily "behind the scenes" role credited only as "Müsel".[6] Musel's musical role included live keyboards and samples, for which he is credited on 1995's Ragnarok.[51]
Mike Bonner 1986–1998 Gwar Slave Bonner joined the Gwar collective in 1986 and is credited with the conception and introduction of the "Gwar Slave" character, the first of many miscellaneous monikers he played.[6] He left in 1998, which according to former member Danielle Stampe (Slymenstra Hymen) he did to focus on his family life and a construction business.[52]
Chuck Varga
  • 1986–1997
  • 2001
The Sexecutioner Varga is a special effects designer, sculptor and illustrator who co-founded Slave Pit Inc. in 1985 and was a founding member of Gwar.[53] He performed regularly with the band as The Sexecutioner, featuring on several albums and videos released by the band.[54] He left in 1997 when he moved away to focus on theatre and film production.[53]
Colette Miller 1986–1987
  • Amazina (1986)
  • Gwar Woman (1986–87)
Miller joined Gwar while Heather Broome was still a member and remained for almost two years, taking on the character of Amazina until Broome left and Miller remained the sole Gwar Woman.[55]
Adam Green Gwar Slave Green was the live and in-studio sound engineer for Gwar during its early performances.[6]
Lisa Harrelson 1987–1988 Gwar Woman Harrelson was the third person to portray the Gwar Woman character, joining after Miller's departure in 1987.[6]
Danielle Stampe
  • 1988–2000
  • 2002–2003
  • 2008
  • 2014
Slymenstra Hymen Stampe took over the role of "Gwar Woman" from Harrelson, after originally assisting with various creative tasks, before creating the character of Slymenstra Hymen and performing backing vocals and dancing.[56] She left in 2000 (save for a few subsequent appearances)[56] and was the last female member of the Gwar collective until 2014.[57]
Danny Black 1989–1992 Gwar Slave Black joined as Gwar's first official roadie in 1989, remaining for only three years and featuring on Live from Antarctica and Phallus in Wonderland before leaving in 1992.[6]
Brian Fechino 1991 none Fechino performed guitars on America Must Be Destroyed following the 1991 departure of Dewey Rowell.[20]
Barry Ward 1992 Before Pete Lee took Rowell's place permanently, Ward performed on the America Must Be Destroyed tour.[20]
Mike Dunn 1992–1997 Gwar Slave Dunn originally joined the Gwar collective in 1992 as a drum technician and later became a full-time member of the Slave Pit in 1994.[6] He was also the drummer for the Gwar-related band X-Cops.[6]
Davis Bradley 1997–2003 Gwar Slave Bradley first started working with Slave Pit Inc. in 1995, before moving to Richmond and joining the collective officially two years later, primarily on video production and costume fabrication.[58] Within six years, he had retired from touring with the band due to a spinal injury, making only sporadic appearances in the future.[58]

TimelineEdit

LineupsEdit

Period Members Releases
1985
  • Ben "Johnny Slutman" Eubanks – lead vocals
  • Dave Brockie – guitar, backing vocals
  • Russ "Mr. Magico" Bahorsky – guitar, backing vocals
  • Steve Douglas – guitar, backing vocals
  • Chris Bopst – bass, backing vocals
  • Sean Sumner – drums, percussion
none – live performances only
1985–1986
  • Joe Annaruma (Joey Slutman) – lead vocals
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Greg Ottenger (Cornelius Carnage) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Ron Curry (Stephen Sphincter) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Chris Bopst (Balsac) – bass, backing vocals
  • Jim Thomson (Hans Sphincter) – drums, percussion
  • Let There Be Gwar (2009) – four tracks
1986
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Greg Ottenger (Cornelius Carnage) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Ron Curry (Stephen Sphincter) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Tim Harriss (unnamed character) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Chris Bopst (Balsac) – bass, backing vocals
  • Jim Thomson (Hans Sphincter) – drums, percussion
none – one live performance only
1986 – early 1987
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Greg Ottenger (Cornelius Carnage) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Ron Curry (Stephen Sphincter) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Chris Bopst (Balsac) – bass, backing vocals
  • Jim Thomson (Hans Sphincter) – drums, percussion
  • Let There Be Gwar (2009) – other tracks
Spring 1987 – early 1988
1988–1989
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Dewey Rowell (Flattus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Bishop (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Rob Mosby (Nippleus Erectus) – drums, percussion
none – live performances only
1989
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Dewey Rowell (Flattus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Bishop (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Pete Luchter (Lee Beato) – drums, percussion
1989
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Dewey Rowell (Flattus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Bishop (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Jim Thomson (Hans Orifice) – drums, percussion
Late 1989 – summer 1991
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Dewey Rowell (Flattus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Bishop (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
Summer 1991 – spring 1992
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Bishop (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
Spring 1992 – late 1993
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Pete Lee (Flattus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Bishop (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
February 1994 – late 1997
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Pete Lee (Flattus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Casey Orr (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
Late 1997 – early 1998
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Casey Orr (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
none – writing and rehearsals only
Early – September 1998
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
September 1998 – early 1999
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Tim Harriss (Flattus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Bishop (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
Early 1999 – summer 2002
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Zach Blair (Flattus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Casey Orr (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
Late 2002 – April 2008
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Cory Smoot (Flattus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Todd Evans (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
April 2008 – August 2011
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Cory Smoot (Flattus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Casey Orr (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
October – November 2011
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Cory Smoot (Flattus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Jamison Land (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
none – live performances only
November 2011 – August 2012
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – guitar, backing vocals
  • Jamison Land (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
August 2012 – March 2014
  • Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) – lead vocals
  • Brent Purgason (Pustulus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Jamison Land (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
  • The 3rd Annual Gwar-B-Q 2012 (2013)
  • Battle Maximus (2013)
  • The 4th Annual Gwar-B-Q 2013 (2014)
May – September 2014
  • Mike Bishop (Blöthar the Berserker) – lead vocals
  • Brent Purgason (Pustulus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Jamison Land (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
none – live performances only
September 2014 – May 2015
  • Mike Bishop (Blöthar the Berserker) – co-lead vocals
  • Kim Dylla (Vulvatron) – co-lead vocals
  • Brent Purgason (Pustulus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Jamison Land (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
May 2015 – February 2019
  • Mike Bishop (Blöthar the Berserker) – lead vocals
  • Brent Purgason (Pustulus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Jamison Land (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
March 2019 – present
  • Mike Bishop (Blöthar the Berserker) – lead vocals
  • Brent Purgason (Pustulus Maximus) – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Derks (Balsac the Jaws of Death) – rhythm guitar, backing vocals
  • Casey Orr (Beefcake the Mighty) – bass, backing vocals
  • Brad Roberts (Jizmak da Gusha) – drums, percussion
none to date – live performances only

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hepburn, Ned (March 24, 2014). "Was GWAR the Most American Metal Band?". Esquire. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  2. ^ Brockie, Dave (February 26, 2010). "GWAR, Me, and the Onrushing Grip of Death: Part 19". RVANews. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c "Timeline: Years 1984–1989". Slave Pit Inc. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  4. ^ Cohen, Matt (March 24, 2014). "GWAR Frontman Dave Brockie (Oderus Urungus) Dead At 50". WAMU. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  5. ^ "Russ Bahorsky Speaks!". SpookyKids.net. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Roster". Slave Pit Inc. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  7. ^ Brockie, Dave (May 21, 2010). "GWAR, Me, and the Onrushing Grip of Death: Part 24". RVANews. Archived from the original on May 24, 2010. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  8. ^ "Gwar: Early Demo Tapes To Be Made Available On Upcoming Tour". Blabbermouth.net. April 11, 2004. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  9. ^ Brockie, Dave (April 9, 2010). "GWAR, Me, and the Onrushing Grip of Death: Part 21". RVANews. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  10. ^ Brockie, Dave (May 7, 2010). "GWAR, Me, and the Onrushing Grip of Death: Part 22". RVANews. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c Brockie, Dave (July 30, 2010). "GWAR, Me, and the Onrushing Grip of Death: Part 25". RVANews. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  12. ^ Brockie, Dave (August 27, 2010). "GWAR, Me, and the Onrushing Grip of Death: Part 26". RVANews. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  13. ^ Brockie, Dave (September 10, 2010). "GWAR, Me, and the Onrushing Grip of Death: Part 27". RVANews. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  14. ^ a b "Gwar". Loudwire. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  15. ^ a b Brockie, Dave (September 14, 2011). "GWAR, Me, and the Onrushing Grip of Death: Part 43". RVANews. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  16. ^ Brockie, Dave (December 8, 2011). "GWAR, Me, and the Onrushing Grip of Death: Part 45". RVANews. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  17. ^ a b Brockie, Dave (August 10, 2012). "GWAR, Me, and the Onrushing Grip of Death: Part 55". RVANews. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  18. ^ Brockie, Dave (October 4, 2011). "GWAR, Me, and the Onrushing Grip of Death: Part 44". RVANews. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  19. ^ a b c d e f "Timeline: Years 1990–1999". Slave Pit Inc. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  20. ^ a b c Sharpe-Young, Garry (November 1, 2005). New Wave of American Heavy Metal. New Plymouth, New Zealand: Zonda Books. p. 162. ISBN 978-0958268400. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  21. ^ a b c d Crigler, Pete (April 13, 2010). Keeping It Tight in the Old Dominion: A History of Virginia Rock Music. Indianapolis, Indiana: Dog Ear Publishing. pp. 42–43. ISBN 978-1608444144. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  22. ^ a b "Timeline: Years 2000–Present". Slave Pit Inc. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  23. ^ "Todd Evans Quits Gwar". Blabbermouth.net. April 2, 2008. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  24. ^ "Gwar: Bassist Casey Orr Returns To The Fold". Blabbermouth.net. April 16, 2008. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  25. ^ "Casey Orr Announces His Departure From Gwar". Blabbermouth.net. August 2, 2011. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  26. ^ "Gwar To Perform On 'Late Night With Jimmy Fallon'". Blabbermouth.net. October 13, 2011. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  27. ^ Hudson, Alex (November 3, 2011). "Gwar Guitarist Cory Smoot Found Dead". Exclaim!. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  28. ^ "Autopsy for GWAR Guitarist Cory Smoot Reveals 'Coronary Artery Thrombosis'". Billboard. December 6, 2011. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  29. ^ "Gwar Frontman Explains Band's Decision To Continue Touring Following Guitarist's Death". Blabbermouth.net. November 4, 2011. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  30. ^ "Gwar Taps Cannabis Corpse Guitarist For Upcoming Album, Tour". Blabbermouth.net. August 23, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  31. ^ DiVita, Joe (September 17, 2013). "Gwar, 'Battle Maximus' – Album Review". Loudwire. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  32. ^ Baldwin, Brent (March 26, 2014). "Gwar Frontman Dave Brockie Has Died". Style Weekly. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  33. ^ Holmberg, Mark (June 3, 2014). "Dave Brockie, GWAR lead singer, died of accidental heroin overdose". WTVR-TV. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  34. ^ "Gwar Returns To Live Stage At Gwar-B-Q; Video Footage Of Entire Set". Blabbermouth.net. August 17, 2014. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  35. ^ "Gwar To Introduce Two New Members On 'Gwar Eternal Tour' This Fall". Blabbermouth.net. September 19, 2014. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  36. ^ "Gwar Parts Ways With Kim Dylla". Blabbermouth.net. May 7, 2015. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  37. ^ "Gwar Unveils 'The Blood Of Gods' Album Details, Releases'F**k This Place' Video". Blabbermouth.net. August 23, 2017. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  38. ^ Hartmann, Graham (February 26, 2019). "Gwar's Jamison Land (Beefcake the Mighty) Leaves the Band". Loudwire. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  39. ^ Johnson, Kevin (June 30, 2019). "Gwar Announces "Use Your Collusion" with New Bassist". No Treble. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  40. ^ "Don Drakulich". Slave Pit Inc. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  41. ^ Lawton, Adam (December 10, 2010). "Interview with GWAR's Don Drakulich". Media Mikes. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  42. ^ "Scott Krahl". Slave Pit Inc. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  43. ^ "Bob Gorman". Slave Pit Inc. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  44. ^ Hooper, Jesse (April 2018). "Bob Gorman". Whurk. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  45. ^ Claire, Colette (December 30, 2016). "Gwar's Matt Maguire Talks Comics, Crowdfunding and Carnage". Screamer. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  46. ^ "The GWARcast: #14 - The Private Pod of Sawborg Destructo". Stitcher Radio. September 2, 2016. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  47. ^ "Dave Brockie, a.k.a. Oderus Urungus, Gwar vocalist". Arash Moussavian. December 22, 2011. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  48. ^ Coffel, Chris (November 25, 2016). "Interview: Sawborg Destructo and Gang Discuss Gwar's New Comic". Bloody Disgusting. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  49. ^ Burke, Lisa (September 9, 2017). "A Multi-Dimensional Legend: An Exclusive Interview with GWAR co-founder Hunter Jackson (Techno Destructo)". Metal Assault. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  50. ^ Carroll, Will; Mussavian, Arash (May 12, 2010). "Interview with Dave Brockie from Gwar". Metal Temple. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  51. ^ "Gwar invades Earth with crushing music". Daily Bruin. January 29, 1996. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  52. ^ von Burden, Zora (September 1, 2010). Women of the Underground: Music – Cultural Innovators Speak for Themselves. San Francisco, California: Manic D Press. p. 280. ISBN 978-1933149509. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  53. ^ a b "Chuck Varga". Slave Pit Inc. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  54. ^ Brown, Eric Renner (October 19, 2017). "GWAR's Sexecutioner breaks down the costume that gives him 'special powers'". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  55. ^ "Colette Miller: Gwar Girl Originale". Citizenia. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  56. ^ a b "Danielle Stampe". Slave Pit Inc. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  57. ^ Michaels, Sean (September 19, 2014). "Gwar replace late singer with Kim Dylla, aka Vulvatron". The Guardian. Retrieved May 11, 2020.
  58. ^ a b "Davis Bradley". Slave Pit Inc. Retrieved May 11, 2020.

External linksEdit