List of Egyptian deities

Ancient Egyptian deities represent natural and social phenomena, as well as abstract concepts.[1] These gods and goddesses appear in virtually every aspect of ancient Egyptian civilization, and more than 1,500 of them are known by name. Many Egyptian texts mention deities' names without indicating their character or role, while other texts refer to specific deities without even stating their name, so a complete list of them is difficult to assemble.[2]

Pharaoh Menkaure of the Fourth Dynasty, accompanied by the goddesses Bat and Hathor

Major deitiesEdit

MaleEdit

  • Aker – A god of the earth and the horizon[3]
  • Amun – A creator god, patron deity of the city of Thebes, and the preeminent deity in Egypt during the New Kingdom[4]
  • Anhur – A god of war and hunting[5][6][7]
  • Aten – Sun disk deity who became the focus of the monolatrous or monotheistic Atenist belief system in the reign of Akhenaten[8]
  • Atum – A creator god and solar deity, first god of the Ennead[9]
  • Bennu – A solar and creator deity, depicted as a heron[10]
  • Geb – An earth god and member of the Ennead[11]
  • Hapi – Personification of the Nile flood[12]
  • Horus – A major god, usually shown as a falcon or as a human child, linked with the sky, the sun, kingship, protection, and healing. Often said to be the son of Osiris and Isis.[13]
  • Khepri – A solar creator god, often treated as the morning form of Ra and represented by a scarab beetle[14]
  • Khnum (Khnemu) – A ram god, the patron deity of Elephantine, who was said to control the Nile flood and give life to gods and humans[15][16]
  • Khonsu – A moon god, son of Amun and Mut[17]
  • Maahes (Mahes, Mihos) – A lion god, son of Bastet[18][19][6]
  • Montu – A god of war and the sun, worshipped at Thebes[20]
  • Nefertum – God of the lotus blossom from which the sun god rose at the beginning of time. Son of Ptah and Sekhmet.[21]
  • Nemty – Falcon god, worshipped in Middle Egypt,[22] who appears in myth as a ferryman for greater gods[23]
  • Neper – A god of grain[24]
  • Osiris – god of death and resurrection who rules the underworld and enlivens vegetation, the sun god, and deceased souls[25]
  • Ptah – A creator deity and god of craftsmen, the patron god of Memphis[26]
  • Ra – The sun god
  • Set – An ambivalent god, characterized by violence, chaos, and strength, connected with the desert. Mythological murderer of Osiris and enemy of Horus, but also a supporter of the king.[27]
  • Shu – Embodiment of wind or air, a member of the Ennead[28]
  • Sobek – Crocodile god, worshipped in the Faiyum and at Kom Ombo[29]
  • Sopdu – A god of the sky and of Egypt's eastern border regions[30]
  • Thoth – A moon god, and a god of writing and scribes, and patron deity of Hermopolis[31]
  • Wadj-wer – Personification of the Mediterranean sea or lakes of the Nile Delta[32]

FemaleEdit

  • Amunet – Female counterpart of Amun and a member of the Ogdoad[3]
  • Anuket – A feathered headdress wearing goddess of Egypt's southern frontier regions, particularly the lower cataracts of the Nile[33][7]
  • Bastet – Goddess represented as a cat or lioness, patroness of the city of Bubastis, linked with protection from evil[34]
  • Bat – Cow goddess from early in Egyptian history, eventually absorbed by Hathor[35]
  • Hathor (Egyptian: Het-Hert) – One of the most important goddesses, linked with the sky, the sun, sexuality and motherhood, music and dance, foreign lands and goods, and the afterlife. One of many forms of the Eye of Ra.[36]
  • Heqet – Frog goddess said to protect women in childbirth[37]
  • Hesat – A maternal cow goddess[38][39]
  • Imentet (Amentet) – An afterlife goddess closely linked with Isis and Hathor[40][19]
  • Isis – Wife of Osiris and mother of Horus, linked with funerary rites, motherhood, protection, and magic. She became a major deity in Greek and Roman religion.[41]
  • Maat – Goddess who personified truth, justice, and order[42]
  • Menhit – A lioness goddess[43]
  • Mut – Consort of Amun, worshipped at Thebes[44]
  • Neith – A creator and hunter goddess, patron of the city of Sais in Lower Egypt[45]
  • Nekhbet (Nekhebit) – A vulture goddess, the tutelary deity of Upper Egypt[46]
  • Nephthys (Egyptian: Nebet-Het) – A member of the Ennead, the consort of Set, who mourned Osiris alongside Isis[47]
  • Nepit – A goddess of grain, female counterpart of Neper[48]
  • Nut – A sky goddess, a member of the Ennead[49]
  • Pakhet – A lioness goddess mainly worshipped in the area around Beni Hasan[50]
  • Renenutet – An agricultural goddess[51]
  • Satet – A goddess of Egypt's southern frontier regions[52][6]
  • Sekhmet – A lioness goddess, both destructive and violent and capable of warding off disease, protector of the pharaohs who led them in war, the consort of Ptah and one of many forms of the Eye of Ra.[53]
  • Tefnut – Goddess of moisture and a member of the Ennead[54]
  • Wadjet (Uatchit) – A cobra goddess, the tutelary deity of Lower Egypt[55]
  • Wosret (Egyptian: Usret) – A goddess of Thebes[56]

Both male and female formsEdit

  • Anubis/Anput – The god/goddess of embalming and protector of the dead[57]
  • Heh – Personification of infinity and a member of the Ogdoad[58]
  • Kek – The god of Chaos and Darkness, as well as being the concept of primordial darkness. Kek's female form is known as Kauket.
  • Nu (Nun) – Personification of the formless, watery disorder from which the world emerged at creation and a member of the Ogdoad[59]
  • Ra (Re) – The foremost Egyptian sun god, involved in creation and the afterlife. Mythological ruler of the gods, father of every Egyptian king, and the patron god of Heliopolis.[60]
  • Tatenen – Personification of the first mound of earth to emerge from chaos in ancient Egyptian creation myths[61]

Minor deitiesEdit

MaleEdit

  • Aani - A protector ape headed god[39]
  • Aati - One of the 42 judges of the souls of the dead[39]
  • Abu -Abu was an early Egyptian god of Light that was likely worshiped in the city of Elephantine.[62]
  • Am-heh - A dangerous underworld god[63]
  • Amenhotep I (Amenhetep I) - The second king of the eighteenth dynasty, deified[64]
  • Amenhotep son of Hapu - A scribe and architect in the court of Amenhotep III, later deified for his wisdom[63]
  • Amu-Aa - A god who accompanies Osiris during the second hour of the night[39]
  • An-a-f - One of the 42 judges of the souls of the dead[39]
  • An-hetep-f - One of the 42 judges of the souls of the dead[39]
  • An-mut-f[39]
  • An-tcher-f[39]
  • Andjety (Anedjti, Anezti) - A god of the ninth nome of Upper Egypt[65]
  • Ani - A god of festivals[39]
  • Anti - A hawk god of Upper Egypt[16]
  • Apedemak - A warlike lion god from Nubia who appears in some Egyptian-built temples in Lower Nubia[66]
  • Apep (Apepi) - A serpent deity who personified malevolent chaos and was said to fight Ra in the underworld every night[67]
  • Āpesh - A turtle god[68]
  • Apis - A live bull worshipped as a god at Memphis and seen as a manifestation of Ptah[69]
  • Arensnuphis - A Nubian deity who appears in Egyptian temples in Lower Nubia in the Greco-Roman era[70]
  • Asclepius - A Greek god worshipped in Egypt at Saqqara
  • Ash - A god of the Libyan Desert and oases west of Egypt[71]
  • Astennu - A baboon god associated with Thoth.
  • Ba - A god of fertility[19]
  • Ba-Ra[39]
  • Baal - Sky and storm god from Syria and Canaan, worshipped in Egypt during the New Kingdom[72]
  • Babi - A baboon god characterized by sexuality and aggression[73]
  • Banebdjedet - A ram god, patron of the city of Mendes[74]
  • Ba-Pef - A little-known underworld deity; ram-headed god of the eighth hour[75][76]
  • Bes - Apotropaic god, represented as a dwarf, particularly important in protecting children and women in childbirth[77]
  • Buchis - A live bull god worshipped in the region around Thebes and a manifestation of Montu[78]
  • Dedun (Dedwen) - A Nubian god, said to provide the Egyptians with incense and other resources that came from Nubia[79]
  • Denwen - A serpent and dragon god[16]
  • Djebuty - Tutelary god of Djeba[80]
  • Djefa - God of abundance[81]
  • Dionysus-Osiris - A life-death-rebirth god.
  • Dua - God of toiletry and sanitation[19]
  • Fa - A god of destiny[39]
  • Fetket - A butler of Ra[6]
  • Gengen Wer - A celestial goose god who guarded the celestial egg containing the life force[16]
  • Ha - A god of the Libyan Desert and oases west of Egypt[12]
  • Ḥapy (Hapi) - A son of Horus[82]
  • Hapy-Wet - God of the Nile in heaven[39]
  • Hardedef (Djedefhor) - Son of King Khufu who was deified after death because he wrote a book considered to be the work of a god[16]
  • Harmachis (Hor-em-akhet) - Sphinx god[39]
  • Harsomtus - A child god of Edfu[83]
  • Haurun - A protector and healing god, originally a Canaanite god[16]
  • Heka (Hike) - Personification of magic[84]
  • Heneb - A god of grain[39]
  • Henkhisesui - God of the east wind[39]
  • Heru-Khu - A god in the fifth division of Tuat[39]
  • Hery-sha-duat - Underworld god in charge of the fields of Tuat[39]
  • Heryshaf - Ram god worshipped at Herakleopolis Magna[85]
  • Horon - originally a Canaanite god
  • Hu - Personification of the authority of the spoken word[86]
  • Iah (Aah, Yah) - A moon god[87][19][6]
  • Ihy (Ihu) - A child deity born to Horus and Hathor, representing the music and joy produced by the sistrum[88][19]
  • Imhotep - Architect and vizier to Djoser, eventually deified as a healer god[89]
  • Jupiter-Amun - A Roman influenced god worshipped at the Siwa Oasis in Egypt[16]
  • Kagemni - A vizier to Sneferu who wrote the Instructions of Kagemni, later deified[16]
  • Khenti-Amenti(u)- A necropolis deity[90][39]
  • Khenti-qerer[39]
  • Khesfu - A god who carries a spear in the tenth division of Tuat[39]
  • Khentekhtai (Khente-Khtai) - Crocodile god worshipped at Athribis[16]
  • Kherty - A netherworld god, usually depicted as a ram[91]
  • Kneph - A ram creator god[19]
  • Mandulis - A Lower Nubian solar deity who appeared in some Egyptian temples[92]
  • Mehen - A serpent god who protects the barque of Ra as it travels through the underworld[93]
  • Mestȧ (Imset) - A son of Horus[82]
  • Min - A god of virility, as well as the cities of Akhmim and Qift and the Eastern Desert beyond them[94]
  • Mnevis - A live bull god worshipped at Heliopolis as a manifestation of Ra[95]
  • Nefer Hor - A son of Thoth[39]
  • Neferhotep - Son of Hathor[83]
  • Nefertum (Nefertem) - God of perfume who was an aspect of Atum, but later became a separate deity[16]
  • Nehebu-Kau - A protective serpent god[96]
  • Nun - God of the primeval waters[97]
  • Panebtawy - A child god, son of Horus the Elder[6]
  • Petbe - God of revenge[19]
  • Peteese - Brother of Pihor who drowned in the Nile, later deified[16]
  • Pihor - Brother of Peteese who drowned in the Nile, later deified[16]
  • Ptah-hotep - Writer of a Wisdom Text, later deified[16]
  • Qebeḥsenuf (Qebehsenuef) - A son of Horus[82]
  • Qebui - God of the north winds[39]
  • Ra-ateni[39]
  • Rā-Ḥerakhty - A beautiful god[98]
  • Reshep - A Syrian war god adopted into Egyptian religion in the New Kingdom, depicted with beard and the crown of Upper Egypt[99][100]
  • Sah - Personification of the constellation Orion[16]
  • Sebeg - Personification of the planet Mercury[101]
  • Sebiumeker - Guardian god of procreation and fertility, he was a major god in Meroe, Kush[16]
  • Sed - A jackal deity who protected kingship[16]
  • Seker - God of the Memphite Necropolis and of the afterlife in general[102]
  • Sekhemus - God of the fourth hour of Tuat[39]
  • Sepa - A centipede god who protected people from snake bites[16]
  • Sepes - A god who lived in a tree[39]
  • Sepṭu - A bearded plume wearing god[100]
  • Serapis - A Greco-Egyptian god from the Ptolemaic Period who fused traits of Osiris and Apis with those of several Greek gods. Husband of Isis who, like her, was adopted into Greek and Roman religion outside Egypt.[103]
  • Seta-Ta - A mummified god in the fourth division of Tuat[39]
  • Setcheh - A serpent demon[39]
  • Setem - A god of healing[39]
  • Shed - A god believed to save people from danger and misfortune[104]
  • Shehbui - God of the south wind
  • Shezmu - A god of wine and oil presses who also slaughters condemned souls[105]
  • Sia - Personification of perception[106]
  • Sopd - God of the eastern delta[101]
  • Sopdet (Sothis) - Personification of the star Sirius, mother of Sopdu[16]
  • Ṭuamutef (Duamutef) - A son of Horus[82]
  • Tutu - An apotropaic god from the Greco-Roman era[107]
  • Uneg/Weneg - A plant god and son of Ra who maintains cosmic order[32][19]
  • Wenenu - A protector god[16]
  • Wepwawet - A jackal god, the patron deity of Asyut, connected with warfare and the afterlife[108]
  • Yam - A Syrian god of the sea who appears in some Egyptian texts[109]

FemaleEdit

  • Ahti - A malevolent hippopotamus goddess[110]
  • Amathaunta - An ocean goddess[19]
  • Ammit - Goddess who devoured condemned souls[111]
  • Amn - A goddess who welcomed souls of the dead in the Underworld[19]
  • Anat (Anta) – A war and fertility goddess, originally from Syria, who entered Egyptian religion in the Middle Kingdom. A daughter of Re, thus, in Egypt, a sister of Astarte.[112][7][113]
  • Anhefta - A protective spirit who guards one end of the ninth division of Tuat[39]
  • Anit - Wife of Andjety[19]
  • Anuke - A war goddess[16]
  • Ảpet - A solar disc wearing goddess worshipped at Thebes[7]
  • Astarte - A warrior goddess from Syria and Canaan who entered Egyptian religion in the New Kingdom[114]
  • Ba'alat Gebal - A Canaanite goddess, patroness of the city of Byblos, adopted into Egyptian religion[115]
  • Besna - Goddess of home security[19]
  • Esna - A divine perch[16]
  • Hatmehit - Fish goddess worshipped at Mendes[58]
  • Hedetet - A minor scorpion goddess[116]
  • Heptet - A knife holding goddess of death[39]
  • Heret-Kau - A protector goddess who protected the souls of the dead in the afterlife[16]
  • Hert-ketit-s - A lioness headed goddess in the eleventh division of Tuat[39]
  • Hert-Nemmat-Set - A goddess in the eleventh division of Tuat who punishes the damned[39]
  • Hert-sefu-s - A goddess in the eleventh division of Tuat[39]
  • Heru-pa-kaut - A mother goddess with a fish on her head[39]
  • Heset - Goddess of food and drink[16]
  • Hetepes-Sekhus - A personification of the eye of Ra, also a cobra goddess[16]
  • Horea - The wife of Set[39]
  • Iat - A goddess of milk and nursing[117]
  • Iabet - Goddess of fertility and rebirth[16]
  • Ipy - A mother goddess depicted as a hippopotamus[16]
  • Ishtar - The East Semitic version of Astarte, occasionally mentioned in Egyptian texts[118]
  • Iusaaset (Ausaas) - A female counterpart to Atum; a solar disc wearing goddess worshipped at Heliopolis[119][120]
  • Iw - A creation goddess[16]
  • Kebehut - Daughter of Anubis, goddess of freshness, she helps him in mummifying dead bodies[6][39][16]
  • Ken - Goddess of love[19]
  • Khefthernebes - A funerary deity[121]
  • Mafdet - A predatory goddess said to destroy dangerous creatures[122]
  • Mehit - A warrior lioness goddess originally from Nubia worshipped at Abydos, consort of Anhur[43][16]
  • Matit - A funerary cat goddess who had a cult center at Thinis[123]
  • Mehet-Weret - A celestial cow goddess[93][124]
  • Menhit (Menhyt) - A solar lioness goddess who personified the brow of Ra[16]
  • Meretseger - A cobra goddess who oversaw the Theban Necropolis[125]
  • Merit - The goddess of music who established cosmic order[16]
  • Meskhenet (Mesenet) - A goddess who presided over childbirth[18]
  • Nakith - A goddess of the underworld[126]
  • Naunet – female counterpart to Nun
  • Nebethetepet - A female counterpart to Atum[21]
  • Nebt-Ankhiu - A goddess of the underworld[127]
  • Nebt-Khu - A goddess of the underworld[127]
  • Nebt-Mat - A goddess of the underworld[127]
  • Nebt-Setau - A goddess of the underworld[127]
  • Nebt-Shat - A goddess of the underworld[127]
  • Nebt-Shefshefet - A goddess of the underworld[127]
  • Nefertari - The mother of Amenhotep I, deified[64]
  • Nehmetawy - A minor goddess, the consort of Nehebu-Kau or Thoth[128]
  • Pelican - Goddess of the dead[101]
  • Perit - A goddess of the underworld[129]
  • Pesi - A goddess of the underworld[129]
  • Qererti[39]
  • Qerhet - Goddess of the eight nomes of Lower Egypt[39]
  • Qetesh (Qudshu) - A goddess of sexuality and sacred ecstasy from Syria and Canaan, adopted into Egyptian religion in the New Kingdom[130]
  • Raet-Tawy - A female counterpart to Ra[131]
  • Rekhit - A goddess of the underworld[132]
  • Renenet - Goddess of fortune[19]
  • Renpet - Goddess who personified the year[131]
  • Sait - A goddess of the underworld[133]
  • Sefkhet-Abwy - Goddess of writing and temple libraries[6]
  • Sehith - A goddess of the underworld[134]
  • Sekhat-Hor - A cow goddess[101]
  • Sekhet-Metu - A goddess of the underworld[134]
  • Seret - A lioness goddess possibly originally from Libya[16]
  • Serket - A scorpion goddess, invoked for healing and protection[135]
  • Sesenet-Khu - A goddess of the underworld[136]
  • Seshat - Goddess of writing and record-keeping, depicted as a scribe[137]
  • Shemat-Khu - A goddess of the underworld[138]
  • Shentayet - A protective goddess possibly of widows[16]
  • Shenty - A cow goddess[139]
  • Shesmetet - A lioness goddess[104]
  • Sopdet - Deification of the star Sirius[140]
  • Swenet - Goddess related to Aswan[141]
  • Ta-Bitjet - A minor scorpion goddess[61]
  • Ta-Sent-Nefert - A wife of Horus the elder[39]
  • Tafner - A vulture headdress wearing goddess[142]
  • Taweret (Thoeris) - Hippopotamus goddess, protector of women in childbirth[143][19]
  • Tayt (Tayet) - Goddess of weaving[144][145]
  • Temet - A female counterpart to Atum[146]
  • Temtith - A goddess of the underworld[147]
  • Tenenet - Goddess of brewing[16]
  • Themath - A goddess of the underworld[147]
  • Thermuthis - Goddess of fate, fertility, and harvest[148]
  • Thmei - Goddess of truth[149]
  • Tjenenyet - A protector goddess[16]
  • Tjenmyt - Goddess of beer[101]
  • Unut - A goddess represented as a snake or a hare, worshipped in the region of Hermopolis[150]
  • Usit - A goddess of the underworld[151]
  • Wepset - A protector serpent goddess[16]
  • Werethekau - A goddess who protected the king[152][153]

Male or femaleEdit

ObjectsEdit

  • Semi - A deified object found in the tenth division of Tuat[39]

Lesser-known deitiesEdit

MaleEdit

  • Ȧakhu - God of the fifth Ảat[155]
  • Ảakhu - A ram headed god[155]
  • Ảakhu-ḥetch-t - A god of the dead[156]
  • Ảakhu-ra - A singing god of dawn[156]
  • Ảakhu-sa-ta-f - A warrior god[156]
  • Ảakhui - A god with two lotus scepters[155]
  • Ȧmi-beq - A god of the dead[157]
  • Ảmi-haf - A god who has a harpoon[158]
  • Ami-Ḥe-t-Serqet-Ka-hetep-t - A god[158]
  • Ảmi-kar - A singing ape god[159]
  • Ảmi-keḥau - A god[159]
  • Ảmi-naut-f - A serpent god[157]
  • Ảmi-nehţ-f - A god[158]
  • Ảmi-neter - A singing god[158]
  • Ảmi-Nu - A sky god[158]
  • Ȧmi-Pe - A lion god[157]
  • Ảmi-reţ - A god[158]
  • Ảmi-seḥseḩ - A god[159]
  • Ảmi-sekhet-f - A god of his domain[159]
  • Ảmi-sepa-f - A god[159]
  • Ảmi-suḥt-f - A god of the ninth Ảat[159]
  • Ảmi-ta - A serpent god[159]
  • Ảmi-ut - God of the ninth day of the month[157]
  • Ảnmut-făbesh - A star god[160]
  • Antywy - A god of the tenth nome of Upper Egypt[161] God of the sixth hour of night.[162]
  • Ảri - The creative god[163]
  • Ảri-em-ăua - God of the sixth hour of night[163]
  • Ảri-en-ȧb-f - A blue eyed god[163]
  • Ảri-ḥetch-f - A light god[163]
  • Ảri-ren-f-tehesef - God of the tenth day of the month[163]
  • Ảri-tchet-f - A god of the ninth day of the month[163]
  • Ảrit-Ảmen - A god[163]
  • Athpi - A god of dawn[164]
  • Ati - A god[164]
  • Ba - A ram god associated with virility[75]
  • Ba-ảakhu-hā-f - A ram headed god[75]
  • Ba-em-uār-ur - A god[75]
  • Ba-ta - An ape god[75]
  • Ba-tau - A god worshipped at Cynopolis[75]
  • Ba-utcha-hāu-f - A ram-headed god[75]
  • Ḥeb - A god[165]
  • Ḥun-sāḥu - A god[166]
  • Ḥutchai - The god of the west wind[165]
  • Khenti-en-Sa-t - A star god[167]
  • Khenti-heh-f - A knife-eyed god who guarded the tomb of Osiris[167]
  • Khenti-ḥenthau - A god[167]
  • Khenti-Ḥet Ȧnes - A god[167]
  • Khenti-kha-t-ảnes - A knife-eyed god who guarded Osiris[167]
  • Khenti-Khas - A god who protected noses of the dead[167]
  • Maa-ảb-khenti-ảḥ-t-f - A god[168]
  • Maa-ảtht-f - A god of the fourteenth Ảat[168]
  • Maa-en-Rā - An ape doorkeeper god[168]
  • Maa-f-ur - A god[168]
  • Maa-ḥa-f - A ferry god[168]
  • Maa-mer-f - God of the twenty-sixth day of the month[168]
  • Men-t - A god[169]
  • Meni - A god[169]
  • Menu - A god of the fifth month[169]
  • Menu-nesu-Ḩeru - A warrior bull god[169]
  • Menu-qeṭ - God of the first Ảat[169]
  • Meţ-en-Ảsảr - A serpent god[170]
  • Meţ-ḥer - A god of the dead[170]
  • Meṭes - A god[170]
  • Meţes - A doorkeeper god[170]
  • Meţes-ảb - An ibis headed god[170]
  • Meṭes-neshen - A god[170]
  • Meţi - A hawk headed god[170]
  • Meţni - A hippopotamus god of evil[170]
  • Meţu-ta-f - A god[170]
  • Neb - A goose god[171]
  • Neb ảa - A singing god of dawn[171]
  • Neb ảmakh - A god who towed the boat of Ảf[171]
  • Neb ankh - A singing god of dawn[172]
  • Neb āq-t - A jackal god[173]
  • Neb Kheper-Khenti-Ṭuat - A Maāt god[174]
  • Neb Khert-ta - A star god[174]
  • Neb pāt - A god[173]
  • Neb seb-t - A god[174]
  • Neb Uast - A god of the boat of Pakhit[173]
  • Neb-Un - A god[173]
  • Neb user - A ram-headed god[173]
  • Neb utchat-ti - A serpent god with human legs[173]
  • Nebti - A god[171]
  • Nekenher - A frightening god[146]
  • Neter - A serpent god[169]
  • Neterti - A god in Ṭuat[169]
  • Neter bah - A god[169]
  • Neter neferu - A god[175]
  • Neter-hāu - Nile god[175]
  • Neter-ka-qetqet - A god who guarded Osiris[175]
  • Neter-kha - God of one thousand years[175]
  • Netrit-ta-meh - An axe god[175]
  • Netrit-Then - An axe god[175]
  • Serq - A serpent god[176]
  • Unnti - The god of existence[177]
  • Untả - A light god[177]
  • Up - An ape god[178]
  • Up-hai - God of the dead[178]
  • Up-shāt-taui - A god[178]
  • Up-uatu - A singing god[178]
  • Upi-sekhemti - A jackal-headed singing god[178]
  • Upt-heka - Enchantment god[178]
  • Upȧst - A light god[178]
  • Upu - God of the serpent Shemti[178]
  • Ur - A god[179]
  • Ur-ȧres (Urȧrset) - A god of a boat[153]
  • Ur-at - A god of Kher-Āḥa[179]
  • Ur-heka - A god of Denderah[153]
  • Ur-henhenu - A water god[153]
  • Ur-henu - A water god[153]
  • Ur-khert - A jackal god in the second Ảat[153]
  • Ur-maati-f - A god[153]
  • Ur-metuu-ḩer-ȧat-f - A god[153]
  • Ur-peḥti - A doorkeeper god[153]
  • Ur-peḩui-f - A god[153]
  • Urrtȧ - A god[179]

FemaleEdit

  • Ảmi-khent-āat - A goddess of Edfû[158]
  • Ảmi-pet-seshem-neterit - One of the 12 Thoueris goddesses[157]
  • Ảmi-urt - A cow goddess[157]
  • Ảmi-utchat-sảakhu-Ảtemt - One of the 12 Thoueris goddesses[157]
  • Ảmit-Qeţem - A goddess who assisted resurrecting Osiris[159]
  • Ảmit-she-t-urt - A goddess[159]
  • Āpertra - A singing goddess[68]
  • Ảrit-ȧakhu - A star goddess[163]
  • Ảriti - A goddess[163]
  • Ba-khati - A goddess[75]
  • Baiut-s-ảmiu-heh - A goddess[75]
  • Ḥebit - An air goddess[165]
  • Hetemit - Goddess of destruction
  • Ḥunit - Goddess of the twenty first day of the month[166]
  • Ḥunit Pe - A tutelary goddess of Buto[166]
  • Ḥunit urit - A tutelary goddess of Heliopolis[166]
  • Ḥuntheth - A lioness goddess[166]
  • Ḥurit urit - A goddess[166]
  • Maa-ā - A singing god[168]
  • Maa-neter-s - A singing goddess[168]
  • Neb Ȧa-t (Nebt Ȧa-t) - A goddess[171]
  • Neb Ȧa-t-Then (Nebt Ȧa-t-Then) - A goddess[171]
  • Neb āāu (Nebt āāu) - A goddess
  • Neb-ābui (Nebt-ābui) - A goddess
  • Neb ȧkeb (Nebt ȧkeb) - A goddess[172]
  • Neb Ȧnit (Nebt Ȧnit) - A goddess[172]
  • Neb ảri-t-qerr-t (Nebt ȧri-t-qerr-t) - A goddess[172]
  • Neb ảrit-tcheṭflu - Goddess who created reptiles[172]
  • Neb ảs-ḥatt - A goddess[172]
  • Neb ȧs-ur (Nebt ȧs-ur) - A goddess[172]
  • Neb Ȧter (Nebt Ȧter-Meḥ) - A goddess[172]
  • Neb ȧter-Shemā (Nebt ȧter-Shemā) - A goddess[172]
  • Neb ảur (Nebt ảur) - A goddess of the river[171]
  • Neb Aut (Neb-t Aut) - A goddess[171]
  • Neb Bȧa-t (Nebt Bȧa-t) - A goddess[173]
  • Neb ḥekau (Nebt ḥekau) - The goddess of spells[174]
  • Neb ḥetep (Nebt ḥetep) - A crocodile goddess[174]
  • Neb Khasa (Nebt Khasa) - A goddess[174]
  • Neb Khebit (Nebt Khebit) - The goddess of Chemmis[174]
  • Neb peḥti (Nebt peḥti) - A goddess[173]
  • Neb Per-res (Nebt Per-res) - A goddess[173]
  • Neb petti (Nebt petti) - A goddess[173]
  • Neb Sa (Nebt Sa) - A goddess[174]
  • Neb Sam (Nebt Sam) - A goddess[174]
  • Neb sau-ta (Nebt sau-ta) - A goddess[174]
  • Neb sebu (Nebt sebu) - A goddess[174]
  • Neb Septi (Nebt Septi) - A goddess[174]
  • Neb-t ȧakhu - A serpent goddess of dawn[171]
  • Neb-t ȧnemit - A goddess of offerings[171]
  • Neb-t ānkh - One of twelve goddesses who opened the gates of Ṭuat to Ảf[172]
  • Neb-t ānkhiu - A goddess with two serpents[172]
  • Neb-t Ảţu - A goddess[172]
  • Neb-t au-t-ȧb - A cow goddess[171]
  • Neb-t Kheper - A serpent goddess[174]
  • Neb-t usha - Goddess of the eighth division of the Ṭuat[173]
  • Neb Un (Nebt Un) - A goddess[173]
  • Nebt Ānnu - A goddess[172]
  • Neterit-nekhenit-Rā - A singing goddess in Ṭuat[175]
  • Un-baiusit (Unt-baiusit) - A goddess[177]
  • Unnit - A goddess[177]
  • Unnuit - A goddess[177]
  • Upit - A serpent goddess[178]
  • Ur-ā - A goddess[153]
  • Urit - A goddess[179]
  • Urit-ȧmi-t-Ṭuat - A goddess of escorting Ra[179]
  • Urit-em-sekhemu-s - Goddess of the fourth hour[153]
  • Urit-en-kru - A lioness headed hippopatomus goddess[153]
  • Urit-ḥekau - Goddess of Upper Egypt[179]
  • Urti-ḥethati - Goddess of Ánu[153]

Male or femaleEdit

  • Medjed - A minor god from the Book of the Dead. "[180]
  • Neb au-t-ȧb - A god or goddess in the Ṭuat[171] (needs additional citation for verification)
  • Netrit fent - An axe god or goddess[169] (needs additional citation for verification)

Groups of deitiesEdit

  • The Aai – 3 guardian deities in the ninth division of Tuat; they are Ab-ta, Anhefta, and Ermen-ta[39]
  • The Cavern deities – Many underworld deities charged with punishing the damned souls by beheading and devouring them.[181]
  • The Ennead – An extended family of nine deities produced by Atum during the creation of the world. The Ennead usually consisted of Atum, his children Shu and Tefnut, their children Geb and Nut, and their children Osiris, Isis, Set, and Nephthys.[182]
  • The Theban Triad consisted of Amun, his consort Mut and their son Khonsu.
  • The four sons of Horus – Four gods who protected the mummified body, particularly the internal organs in canopic jars.[183]
  • The Gate deities – Many dangerous guardian deities at the gates of the underworld (flanked by divine Doorkeepers and Heralds), to be ingratiated by spells and knowing their names.[184]
  • The Hemsut (or Hemuset) – Protective goddesses of Fate, destiny, and of the creation sprung from the primordial abyss; daughters of Ptah, linked to the concept of ka[185][186]
  • The Her-Hequi – 4 deities in the fifth division of Tuat[39]
  • The Hours of the day deities – 12 divine embodiments of each hour of the day: partly major deities (1st: Maat and Nenit, 2nd: Hu and Ra em-nu, 4th: Ashespi-kha, 5th: Nesbit and Agrit, 6th: Ahait, 7th: Horus and Nekait or Nekai-t, 8th: Khensu and Kheprit, 9th: Neten-her-netch-her and Ast em nebt ankh, 10th: Urit-hekau or Hekau-ur, 11th: Amanh, and partly lesser-known ones (12th: "The One Who Gives Protection In The Twilight").[187]
  • The Hours of the night deities – 12 goddesses of each hour of the night, wearing a five-pointed star on their heads. Neb-t tehen and Neb-t heru, god and goddess of the 1st hour of night, Apis or Hep (in reference) and Sarit-neb-s, god and goddess of the 2nd hour of night, M'k-neb-set, goddess of the 3rd hour of night, Aa-t-shefit or Urit-shefit, goddess of the 4th hour of the night, Heru-heri-uatch-f and Neb[t] ankh, god and goddess of the 5th hour of the night, Ari-em-aua (god) or Uba-em-tu-f and Mesperit, neb-t shekta or Neb-t tcheser, god and goddess of the 6th hour of the night, Heru-em-sau-ab and Herit-t-chatcha-ah, god and goddess of the 7th hour of the night, Ba-pefi and Ankh-em-neser-t or Merit-neser-t, god and goddess of the 8th hour of night, An-mut-f and Neb-t sent-t, god and goddess of the 9th hour of the night, Amset or Neb neteru and M'k-neb-set, god and goddess of the 10th hour of night, Uba-em-tu-f and Khesef-khemit or M'kheskhemuit, god and goddess of the 11th hour, Khepera and Maa-neferut-Ra, god and goddess of the 12th hour of the night.[187]
  • The 42 judges of Maat – 42 deities including Osiris who judged the souls of the dead in the afterlife
  • The Khnemiu – 4 deities wearing red crowns in the eleventh division of Tuat[39]
  • The Ogdoad – A set of eight gods who personified the chaos that existed before creation. The Ogdoad commonly consisted of AmunAmunet, Nu – Naunet, Heh – Hauhet, and Kek – Kauket.[188]
  • The Renniu – 4 bearded gods in the eleventh division of Tuat[39]
  • The Setheniu-Tep – 4 deities wearing white crowns in the eleventh division of Tuat[39]
  • The Souls of Pe and Nekhen – A set of gods personifying the predynastic rulers of Upper and Lower Egypt.[189]
  • The 12 Thoueris goddesses[157]

CitationsEdit

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Works citedEdit

  • Allen, James P. (2000). Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-77483-7.
  • Hart, George (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Egyptian Gods and Goddesses, Second Edition. Routledge. ISBN 0-203-02362-5.
  • Porter, Bertha; Moss, Rosalind (1991). Topographical Bibliography of Ancient Egyptian Hieroglyphic Texts, Reliefs, and Paintings. Griffith Institute, Ashmolean Museum Oxford. ISBN 978-0900416828.
  • Wilkinson, Richard H. (2003). The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt. Thames & Hudson. ISBN 0-500-05120-8.
  • Lorton, Claude Traunecker. Transl. from the French by David (2001). The gods of Egypt (1st English-language edn, enhanced and expanded). Ithaca, N.Y [u.a.]: Cornell University Press. ISBN 0-8014-3834-9.
  • Budge, Sir Ernest A. Wallis (2010). An Egyptian hieroglyphic dictionary (in two volumes, with an index of English words, king list and geographical list with indexes, list of hieroglyphic characters, Coptic and Semitic alphabets). New York: Cosimo Classics. ISBN 978-1-61640-460-4.
  • "Aswan History Facts and Timeline: Aswan, Egypt". http://www.world-guides.com/africa/egypt/aswan/aswan_history.html.
  • Petry, Alan W. Shorter; with a new bibliography by Bonnie L. (1994). The Egyptian gods : a handbook (rev. edn). San Bernardino (Calif.): The Borgo Press. ISBN 0-89370-535-7.
  • "Gods of Egypt". http://www.touregypt.net/godsofegypt/.
  • Willockx, Sjef. "Amentet, Andjeti and Anubis: Three Ancient Egyptian Gods (2007)".
  • Mark, Joshua J. "Egyptian Gods - The Complete List". https://www.ancient.eu/article/885/egyptian-gods---the-complete-list/.
  • Nelson, Thomas (2017). The Woman's Study Bible: Receiving God's Truth for Balance, Hope, and Transformation. Biblica, Inc.
  • "GVC09-24: Mystical creatures and gods -Egyptian". [1]
  • Durdin-Robertson, Lawrence (1979). Communion With The Goddes: Idols, Images, and Symbols of the Goddesses; Egypt Part III. Cesara Publications.
  • translations, translated by Raymond O. Faulkner; with additional; Wasserman, a commentary by Ogden Goelet JR.; with color illustrations from the facsimile volume produced in 1890 under the supervision of E.A. Wallis Budge; introduced by Carol A. R. Andrews; edited by Eva Von Dassow; in an edition conceived by James (1994). The Egyptian Book of the dead : the Book of going forth by day : being the Papyrus of Ani (royal scribe of the divine offerings), written and illustrated circa 1250 B.C.E., by scribes and artists unknown, including the balance of chapters of the books of the dead known as the theban recension, compiled from ancient texts, dating back to the roots of Egyptian civilization (1st edn). San Francisco: Chronicle Books. ISBN 0-8118-0767-3.

Further readingEdit