List of Dragon Ball anime

Dragon Ball is a Japanese media franchise created by Akira Toriyama in 1984. Five anime instalments based on the franchise have been produced by Toei Animation: Dragon Ball (1986); Dragon Ball Z (1989); Dragon Ball GT (1996); and Dragon Ball Super (2015); followed by the web series Super Dragon Ball Heroes (2018). Since 1986, twenty theatrical animated films based on the franchise have been released: four based on the original Dragon Ball anime, fifteen based on Dragon Ball Z and one based on Dragon Ball Super. There are also several television specials that were broadcast on Fuji TV and two short films, which were shown at the 2008 Jump Super Anime Tour and Jump Festa 2012 respectively. A two-part hour-long crossover TV special between Dragon Ball Z, One Piece and Toriko aired on Fuji TV in 2013. Additionally, there is a two-part original video animation created as strategy guides for the 1993 video game Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans, which was remade in 2010 and included with the Raging Blast 2 video game.

As with the franchise's anime television series, all twenty films and the first three TV specials were licensed in North America by Funimation. In Europe, AB Groupe licensed the second and third Dragon Ball movies, the first nine Z movies and the first two TV specials.

Dragon Ball is one of the most successful franchises in animation history.[1] The anime series is broadcast in more than 80 countries worldwide.[2] In the United States, the anime series has sold more than 30 million DVD and Blu-ray units as of 2017.[1]

TV seriesEdit

No. Japanese title English title Episodes Japanese release North American release
1 Doragon Bōru (ドラゴンボール) Dragon Ball 153 February 26, 1986 (1986-02-26)–April 19, 1989 (1989-04-19) January 6, 1990 (1990-01-06)-February 3, 1990 (1990-02-03) (Harmony Gold dub)
January 5, 1992 (1992-01-05)–December 11, 1994 (1994-12-11) (NGN subtitled broadcast)[a][3]
1993–1994 (Telemundo dub, Spanish)[b][4]
September 9, 1995 (1995-09-09)–December 2, 1995 (1995-12-02) (BLT dub)
August 20, 2001 (2001-08-20)–December 1, 2003 (2003-12-01) (Funimation dub)
2 Doragon Bōru Zetto (ドラゴンボールゼット) Dragon Ball Z 291[c] April 26, 1989 (1989-04-26)–January 31, 1996 (1996-01-31) December 12, 1994 (1994-12-12)–August 8, 2000 (2000-08-08) (NGN subtitled broadcast)
September 13, 1996 (1996-09-13)[d]–April 7, 2003 (2003-04-07) (Funimation[e] dub)
3 Doragon Bōru Jī Tī (ドラゴンボールGT) Dragon Ball GT 64[f] February 7, 1996 (1996-02-07)–November 19, 1997 (1997-11-19) August 14, 2000 (2000-08-14)–March 26, 2001 (2001-03-26) (NGN subtitled broadcast)
November 7, 2003 (2003-11-07)–January 29, 2005 (2005-01-29) (Funimation dub)
4 Doragon Bōru Kai (ドラゴンボール改) Dragon Ball Z Kai 167[g] February 7, 2009 (2009-02-07)–March 27, 2011 (2011-03-27)
April 6, 2014 (2014-04-06)–June 28, 2015 (2015-06-28)
May 24, 2010 (2010-05-24)–February 8, 2012 (2012-02-08)
January 7, 2017 (2017-01-07)–June 23, 2018 (2018-06-23) (as The Final Chapters)
5 Doragon Bōru Sūpā (ドラゴンボール超) Dragon Ball Super 131 July 5, 2015 (2015-07-05)–March 15, 2018 (2018-03-15) January 7, 2017 (2017-01-07)–October 5, 2019 (2019-10-05)
Total 806

Web seriesEdit

In May 2018, V Jump announced a promotional anime for the game Super Dragon Ball Heroes that adapts the games story arcs.[7][8][9]

Japanese title English title Japanese release North American release
Sūpā Doragon Bōru Hirozu (スーパー ドラゴンボールヒーローズ) Super Dragon Ball Heroes July 1, 2018 (2018-07-01) – present

FilmsEdit

Television specialsEdit

The Dragon Ball franchise has spawned three one-hour long television specials that aired on Fuji TV, the first two based on the "Z" portion of the series and the third based on the "GT" portion. Of these specials, the first and third are original stories created by the anime staff, while the second is based on a special chapter of the manga.

Though the specials aired on TV in Japan, Funimation's North American releases of the episodes are on home video, each one labeled "Feature" the same as their theatrical films. This, doubled with the inclusion of the "Z" specials in Funimation's remastered "Movie Double Features" has caused fans to continue to erroneously believe these to be theatrical films, when they are not.

On April 7, 2013, a two-part hour-long crossover TV special, between Dragon Ball Z, One Piece and Toriko, referred to as Dream 9 Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Super Collaboration Special!! aired on Fuji TV.[10] The first part is named "Run, Strongest Team! Toriko, Luffy, Goku!" (走れ最強軍団!トリコとルフィと悟空!, Hashire Saikyō Gundan! Toriko to Luffy to Goku!) and the second is titled "History's Strongest Collaboration vs. Glutton of the Sea" (史上最強コラボVS海の大食漢, Shijō Saikyō Collaboration vs. Umi no Taishokukan).[10] The plot has the International Gourmet Organization (from Toriko) sponsoring the Tenka'ichi Shokuōkai, a race with no rules that characters from all three series compete in.[11]

On October 8, 2017, a two-part TV special of Dragon Ball Super aired on Fuji TV. It counted as both episodes 109 and 110 of the series.

On December 2, 2018, as part of promoting new film Broly, a one-hour television special aired on Fuji TV in Japan entitled "Just Before the Dragon Ball Super Movie Debut! Looking Back on the TV Show's Climax ".[12]

Japanese title
English translation
English title Japanese air date North American release
Tatta Hitori no Saishū Kessen ~Furīza ni Idonda Zetto-senshi Son Gokū no Chichi~
(たったひとりの最終決戦〜フリーザに挑んだZ戦士 孫悟空の父〜)
A Lonesome, Final Battle - The Father of Z Warrior Son Goku, who Challenged Freeza
Bardock – The Father of Goku October 17, 1990 (1990-10-17) January 31, 2001 (2001-01-31)
Kyokugen Batoru!! San Dai Sūpā Saiya-jin Supesharu
(極限バトル!!三大超スーパーサイヤ人 スペシャル)
Extreme Battle!! Three Great Super Saiyans Special
August 3, 1992 (1992-08-03)
Zetsubō e no Hankō!! Nokosareta Chō-Senshi•Gohan to Torankusu
(絶望への反抗!!残された超戦士・悟飯とトランクス)
Defiance in the Face of Despair!! The Remaining Super-Warriors: Gohan and Trunks
The History of Trunks February 24, 1993 (1993-02-24) October 24, 2000 (2000-10-24)
Zenbu Misemasu Toshi Wasure Doragon Bōru Zetto!
(全部見せます 年忘れドラゴンボールZ!)
We'll Show You Everything: Forget the Year's Cares with Dragon Ball Z!
December 31, 1993 (1993-12-31)
Gokū Gaiden! Yūki no Akashi wa Sūshinchū
(悟空外伝! 勇気の証しは四星球)
Goku Side Story! The Proof of His Courage is the Four-Star Ball
A Hero's Legacy March 26, 1997 (1997-03-26) November 16, 2004 (2004-11-16)
Dorīmu Nain Toriko Wan Pīsu Dragon Bōru Zetto Chō Korabo Supesharu!!
(ドリーム9 トリコ×ONE PIECE×ドラゴンボールZ 超コラボスペシャル!!)
Dream 9 Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Super Collaboration Special!!
April 7, 2013 (2013-04-07)
Korezo Zen Uchū Ichi no Kyūkyoku Batoru! Son Gokū bāsasu Jiren!!
(これぞ全宇宙一の究極バトル! 孫悟空VSジレン!!)
This is the Ultimate Battle in All the Universes! Son Goku vs Jiren!!
October 8, 2017 (2017-10-08) May 4 & May 11, 2019
(as Dragon Ball Super episodes 109 & 110)
Doragon Bōru no Chokuzen Sūpā Eiga Debyū! Terebi Bangu no Kuraimakkusu o Furikaette!!
(ドラゴンボールの直前スーパー映画デビュー!テレビ番組のクライマックスを振り返って!!)
Just Before the Dragon Ball Super Movie Debut! Looking Back on the TV Show's Climax
December 2, 2018 (2018-12-02)

Festival filmsEdit

Dragon Ball: Yo! Son Goku and His Friends Return!! is a 35-minute anime short film that was shown at the 2008 Jump Super Anime Tour, which visited ten Japanese cities to celebrate Weekly Shōnen Jump's 40th anniversary.[13] It was later released as a triple feature DVD with One Piece: Romance Dawn Story and Tegami Bachi: Light and Blue Night Fantasy in 2009, that was available only through a mail-in offer exclusive to Japanese residents.[14] In 2013, it was included in the limited edition home video release of Battle of Gods.

Another short film, Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock, was shown at the Jump Festa 2012 event on December 17, 2011.[15] It is an adaptation of the three part spin-off manga of the same name by Naho Ōishi that ran in V Jump from August to October 2011, which is a spin-off sequel to the Bardock – The Father of Goku TV special.[16] It was later released on DVD in the February 3, 2012 issue of Saikyō Jump together with Dragon Ball: Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans.[17] The film was included subtitled in the European and North American exclusive Xbox 360 video game Dragon Ball Z: For Kinect, released in October 2012.[18]

Japanese title English title Japanese release North American release
Ossu! Kaette Kita Son Gokū to Nakama-tachi!! (オッス! 帰ってきた孫悟空と仲間たち!!) Yo! Son Goku and His Friends Return!! September 21, 2008 (2008-09-21)
Episōdo obu Bādakku (エピソードオブバーダック) Episode of Bardock December 17, 2011 (2011-12-17) October 9, 2012 (2012-10-09)

Original video animationsEdit

In 1993, Toei Animation, in cooperation with Weekly Shōnen Jump and V Jump, produced a two-part original video animation (OVA) that serves as a video strategy guide to the Family Computer game titled Dragon Ball Z Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans.[19] The first volume was released on VHS on July 23, while the second was released on August 25.[citation needed] The animation was also used in the 1994 two part video games, True Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans, released for the Playdia. The complete OVA was included in the second Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box DVD set released in Japan in 2003.

The OVA was remade for the 2010 PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 video game Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2 under the title Dragon Ball: Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans.[19] It was included in Dragon Ball: Raging Blast 2 as a bonus feature, unlocked at the start of gameplay without any necessary cheat code or in-game achievement, presented in its original Japanese-language audio with subtitles appropriate for each region. It was later released on DVD in the February 3, 2012 issue of Saikyō Jump together with Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock.[17]

Japanese title English title Japanese release North American release
Gaiden: Saiya-jin Zetsumetsu Keikaku (外伝 サイヤ人絶滅計画) Side Story: Plan to Eradicate the Saiyans August 6, 1993 (1993-08-06)
Sūpā Saiya-jin Zetsumetsu Keikaku (超サイヤ人絶滅計画) Plan to Eradicate the Super Saiyans November 11, 2010 (2010-11-11) November 2, 2010 (2010-11-02)

Educational programsEdit

Two educational shorts based on the original Dragon Ball anime were produced in 1988. The first was a traffic safety special titled Goku's Traffic Safety (悟空の交通安全, Gokū no Kōtsū Ansen), while the second was a fire safety special titled Goku's Fire Brigade (悟空の消防隊, Gokū no Shōbōtai). The two educational films were included in the Dragon Box DVD set released in Japan in 2004.

Japanese title English translation Japanese release
Gokū no Kōtsū Ansen (悟空の交通安全) Goku's Traffic Safety June 1988
Gokū no Shōbōtai (悟空の消防隊) Goku's Fire Brigade June 1988

Commercial receptionEdit

Dragon Ball is one of the most successful franchises in animation history.[1] The anime series is broadcast in more than 80 countries worldwide.[2] DVD home video releases of the Dragon Ball anime series have topped Japan's sales charts on several occasions.[20][21] In the United States, the Dragon Ball Z anime series sold over 25 million DVD units by January 2012.[22] As of 2017, the Dragon Ball anime franchise has sold more than 30 million DVD and Blu-ray units in the United States.[1]

The following table lists Toei Animation's net earnings from Dragon Ball anime home media, including domestic and overseas licensing as well as overseas sales, between 2003 and 2019. It does not include sales or earnings from domestic or overseas licensee companies, such as Fuji TV or Pony Canyon in Japan, or Funimation in North America, for example, but only includes Toei Animation's earnings as an anime licensor and overseas distributor.

Fiscal period Toei Animation Dragon Ball earnings (net) Ref
April 2003 to March 2012 ¥21.84 billion ($274 million) [23]
April 2012 to March 2013 ¥1.06 billion ($13.28 million)
April 2013 to March 2014 ¥1.174 billion ($12.03 million)
April 2014 to March 2015 ¥1.913 billion ($18.06 million)
April 2015 to March 2016 ¥5.091 billion ($46.8 million) [24]
April 2016 to March 2017 ¥9.17 billion ($84.29 million)
April 2017 to March 2018 ¥14.536 billion ($132 million)
April 2018 to December 2018 ¥14.45 billion ($131 million)
January 2019 to March 2019 ¥5.492 billion ($50.38 million)
April 2019 to September 2020 ¥28.576 billion ($271 million) [24][25]
April 2003 to September 2020 ¥103.302 billion ($1.033 billion)

Individual seriesEdit

The following table lists Dragon Ball anime DVD and Blu-ray sales in Japan (excluding home video sales of the anime films)[26] and the United States.

Anime series Video sales Sales revenue (est.) References
Japan United States Japan United States Japan United States
Dragon Ball 602,966 Un­known ¥2,291,270,800 Un­known [27][28]
Dragon Ball Z 2,497,579 25,000,000+ ¥9,490,800,200 $625,000,000 [27][29][30] [22][31][32]
Dragon Ball GT 582,153 Un­known ¥2,212,181,400 Un­known [27][33]
Dragon Ball Dragon Box 30,000 Un­known ¥3,150,000,000 [34][35]
Dragon Ball Z Dragon Box 63,500 Un­known ¥6,350,000,000 [36][37][35]
Dragon Ball GT Dragon Box 58,500 Un­known ¥5,850,000,000 [38][35]
Dragon Ball Super 14,243 Un­known ¥188,007,600 Un­known [39][40]
Regional total 3,848,941 30,000,000+ ¥29,532,260,000 ($369 million) $750,000,000 [1][31][32]
Worldwide total 33,848,941+ $1.119 billion+

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Available in Hawaii and California only
  2. ^ Available in Latin America and the southern US only. Released under the name "Zero y el Dragon Magico"
  3. ^ Cut to 276 episodes in Funimation's North American broadcast
  4. ^ The debut date varied significantly across regional TV networks at the time- with most networks airing the first episode during the weekend of September 14th-15th, but some as early as the 12th[5]
  5. ^ This dub was recorded at Ocean Productions before Funimation switched to an in-house cast in 1998. Both versions were produced by Funimation, though they are sometimes listed separately.
  6. ^ Cut to 49 in Funimation's North American broadcast
  7. ^ Only 158 episodes were broadcast in Japan, for several reasons. Episode 98 was not broadcast due to scheduling changes following the 2011 earthquake. The Final Chapters episodes were edited heavily for the Japanese broadcast, shortening the run by a further eight episodes in total, with the complete version only broadcast internationally. The Japanese home media release includes episode 98, but uses the shorter cut of The Final Chapters.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e "'Dragon Ball's' voice of Goku speaks for himself". Los Angeles Times. June 30, 2017. Archived from the original on June 30, 2017. Retrieved June 30, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "深夜アニメの製作資金は約3億円…儲ける仕組みや製作委員会の構造とは 今こそ知っておきたいアニメビジネスの特徴を取材". Social Game Info (in Japanese). 2016-06-17. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  3. ^ "Feature | the Dragon Ball Z American Debut Date".
  4. ^ "Dragon Ball: ¿Cuándo y cómo se emitió el anime por primera vez en México?". 24 February 2021.
  5. ^ "Feature | the Dragon Ball Z American Debut Date".
  6. ^ "Episode Guide | Dragon Ball Kai TV Series".
  7. ^ ""Dragon Ball Heroes" New Anime Series Debuts First Trailer". hotnewhiphop.com. June 21, 2018.
  8. ^ Peters, Megan (May 17, 2018). "'Dragon Ball' Reveals New Anime Project". ComicBook.com. Retrieved October 2, 2018.
  9. ^ "Super Dragon Ball Heroes Promotional Anime's Trailer, July 1 Online Premiere Revealed". Anime News Network. June 28, 2018. Retrieved July 1, 2018.
  10. ^ a b "Toriko, One Piece, Dragon Ball Z Get Crossover Anime Special". Anime News Network. 2013-02-05. Retrieved 2013-02-06.
  11. ^ "Toriko & One Piece & Dragon Ball Z Crossover Lineup Revealed". Anime News Network. 2013-02-06. Retrieved 2013-02-06.
  12. ^ Nick Valdez (23 November 2018). "'Dragon Ball Super' to Air One-Hour 'Broly' Special". ComicBook. Retrieved 18 December 2018.
  13. ^ "Jump Super Anime Tour Announcement". Weekly Shōnen Jump (in Japanese). 40 (21): 54 & 55. April 21, 2008.
  14. ^ "New DB, Tegami Bachi, Romance Dawn Anime DVD Offered". Anime News Network. 2008-12-12. Retrieved 2012-12-12.
  15. ^ "Dragon Ball: Episode of Bardock to Be Shown in December". Anime News Network. 2011-11-21. Retrieved 2012-12-15.
  16. ^ "Dragon Ball Episode of Bardock Spinoff Manga Gets Anime". Anime News Network. 2011-11-21. Retrieved 2012-12-15.
  17. ^ a b "2 Dragon Ball Anime Specials Get DVD Release". Anime News Network. 2012-01-03. Retrieved 2012-12-15.
  18. ^ "DRAGON BALL Z FOR KINECT TO FEATURE EXCLUSIVE PLAYABLE CHARACTER AND ANIME EPISODE". Crunchyroll. 2012-07-18. Retrieved 2014-11-12.
  19. ^ a b "Dragon Ball: RB2 Game to Add New 1/2-Hour Anime". Anime News Network. 2010-08-09. Retrieved 2013-02-06.
  20. ^ "Japanese Animation DVD Ranking, September 10–16". Anime News Network. September 20, 2008. Retrieved October 11, 2008.
  21. ^ "Japanese Animation DVD Ranking, August 6–12". Anime News Network. August 14, 2008. Retrieved October 11, 2008.
  22. ^ a b "Funimation January 2012 Catalog" (PDF). thecnl.com. Retrieved July 30, 2017.
  23. ^ "IR Library – Archives". Toei Animation (in Japanese). Toei Company. Archived from the original on 2020-07-07. Retrieved 24 March 2019.
  24. ^ a b "IR Library – Financial statements". Toei Animation. Toei Company. Retrieved 29 January 2021.
  25. ^ "Historical exchange rates (28,576 JPY to USD)". fxtop.com. September 2020. Retrieved 29 January 2021.
  26. ^ "Home Video Guide: Japan Releases". Kanzenshuu. Retrieved June 21, 2018.
  27. ^ a b c "1999 and Earlier, Average Sales (including re-releases)". Someanithing: Anime DVD/BD Sales in Japan. Archived from the original on September 27, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018.
  28. ^ "Japan Releases: Dragon Ball Individual Discs". Kanzenshuu. Retrieved June 21, 2018.
  29. ^ "2007年3月期 中間決算 (2006/4~2006/9) 2006/9)" (PDF). Toei Animation. Toei Company. 2006-11-30. p. 9-1. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  30. ^ "Japan Releases: Dragon Ball Z Individual Discs". Kanzenshuu. Retrieved June 21, 2018.
  31. ^ a b "Dealerscope Consumer Electronics Marketplace: For CE, PC and Major Appliance Retailers". Dealerscope Consumer Electronics Marketplace. North American Publishing Company. 1999. Dragon Ball Z: Arrival (anime), Pioneer, NR, $24.98
  32. ^ a b "Dragon Ball Z DVD and VHS releases". Anime News Network. 2001-01-26. Archived from the original on 3 January 2008. Retrieved 24 March 2019.
  33. ^ "Japan Releases: Dragon Ball GT Individual Discs". Kanzenshuu. Retrieved June 21, 2018.
  34. ^ "フジテレビ会社案内~フジテレビアウトライン~". Fuji TV. Archived from the original on January 21, 2005. Retrieved January 21, 2005.
  35. ^ a b c "Home Video Guide: Japanese Releases". Kanzenshuu. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  36. ^ "第68期 中間事業報告書 [平成17年4月1日~平成17年9月30日]" (PDF). Toei Animation. Toei Company. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  37. ^ "第68期 中間事業報告書 [平成15年4月1日~平成16年3月31日]" (PDF). Toei Animation. Toei Company. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  38. ^ "平成18年3月期 第 1 四半期決算短信(連結)" (PDF). Toei Animation. Toei Company. 2005-07-28. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  39. ^ "2000-Present, Long-running franchises, Average and Per-volume sales". Someanithing: Anime DVD/BD Sales in Japan. Retrieved 24 March 2019.
  40. ^ "Japan Releases: Dragon Ball Super Box Sets". Kanzenshuu. Retrieved June 21, 2018.

External linksEdit