List of Dia Art Foundation locations and sites

There are eleven locations and sites which the Dia Art Foundation considers part of its constellation of art museums and long-term installations.[1] Dia breaks its holdings into two distinct categories: locations and sites. "Locations" include museum structures that contain galleries of smaller works either on permanent or temporary display, while "sites" are long-term art installations placed outside of the gallery context that have been either commissioned or acquired by Dia. All three locations are found in New York state, while the eight sites are located in New York, Utah, New Mexico, and Germany.[2] Currently one location, Dia SoHo, is scheduled to be opened in 2022,[3][4] and there are seven sites that were once listed by Dia but are no longer listed.

A brick factory building, complete with smokestack, sits in the distance surrounded by a field and in front of hills covered in trees
The Dia Beacon building and surrounding landscape.

The Dia Art Foundation was established in 1974 in New York City by the not yet married Heiner Friedrich and Schlumberger heiress Philippa de Menil, as well as Helen Winkler. They created the institution to help artists realize ambitious projects whose scale and scope is not feasible within the normal museum and gallery systems.[5][6] With Friedrich and de Menil's combined large fortune, the foundation began supporting minimalist, conceptual, and land artists with, as Vanity Fair describes in an article, "stipends, studios, assistants, and archivists for the individual museums it planned to build for each of them".[6] Beginning with a collection of warehouse spaces in New York and outdoor spaces in the American West, the foundation did not focus on constructing true museums but focused on singular artistic visions.[7] This approach changed slightly in 1987 with the opening of Dia's first rotating exhibition space, the Dia Center for the Arts, now Dia Chelsea, on 22nd Street in New York City.[8] Dia Beacon, a former Nabisco box factory turned into a large-scale museum for the permanent collection, opened in 2003.[8][9]

The foundation began by working with and collecting the work of only twelve artists: Joseph Beuys, Walter De Maria, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Imi Knoebel, Blinky Palermo, Fred Sandback, James Turrell, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, Robert Whitman, and La Monte Young.[8][9] To this day the foundation owns works by less than 50 artists, but contains a breadth and depth of their work in a way other institutions do not have the resources to maintain.[7] Dia Director Jessica Morgan explains the relationship between Dia and its artists as, "I wouldn't use the word 'family', but these are people we're in communication with almost on a weekly basis, and in some cases we hold the vast majority of their seminal work".[7] Known for its focus on American male minimalist, experimental, and land artists from the 1960s and 1970s, Dia's focus has been changing to include other artists from the era, largely women and Japanese artists, since Morgan became curator in 2015.[9] This gradual refocus is markedly seen in the 2018 acquisition of Sun Tunnels by Nancy Holt, Dia's most recent addition to their list of sites.[9]

LocationsEdit

 
One of the three buildings that together form Dia Chelsea.

Dia maintains three locations all within New York State. These locations present galleries of work, either owned by or loaned to Dia, in temporary or permanent installations.[2] Dia Chelsea, the first Dia location, was known as the Dia Center for the Arts from its opening in 1987 through the opening of Dia Beacon in 2003.[8]

Location[2] Placement Year opened Description Ref.
Dia Beacon Beacon,
New York
2003 Dia's permanent collection is housed in this former Nabisco box printing factory with each gallery designed for the presentation of a single artist's work. [10]
Dia Bridgehampton Bridgehampton,
New York
1979 building purchased by Dia,
1983 Dan Flavin Art Institute established
2020 renamed[a]
Home of the Dan Flavin Art Institute, nine fluorescent light works by the artist on permanent display, the former fire house and church also has a gallery for rotating exhibitions. [13]
Dia Chelsea New York City,
New York
1987,
2004 closed,
2015 moved and reopened,
2020 renovation and expansion
A collection of three former industrial buildings, architecturally connected during a 2020 renovation, which now hosts temporary exhibitions. [14][15]

SitesEdit

 
The location in Times Square where Max Neuhaus's sound art installation, Times Square, emanates.
 
The only part of The Vertical Earth Kilometer visible above ground.

Dia lists eight sites in its catalogue. These sites include commissions, land art, long-term art installations not in a gallery context, and site-specific installations. While focused largely in New York City and the American West, there are sites also placed internationally and elsewhere in the United States. The first sites were a trio of acquisitions and commissions by Walter De Maria in 1977 and the most recently collected site is Sun Tunnels by Nancy Holt acquired in 2018.[2]

Site[2] Artist Placement Year Year acquired Description Ref.
7000 Oaks Joseph Beuys New York City,
New York
1982 begun,
1988 NYC installation,
1996, 2020 expanded
1988 38 trees each paired with a roughly four foot tall basalt stone. [16]
Spiral Jetty Robert Smithson Great Salt Lake at Rozel Point,
Box Elder County,
Utah
1970 1999 A 1,500-foot-long (460 m) by 16-foot-wide (4.9 m) jetty made from six thousand tons of black basalt and soil from the area arranged in spiral. [17]
Sun Tunnels Nancy Holt Great Basin Desert,
Utah
1973-76 2018 Four concrete cylinders, measuring eighteen feet long by nine feet in diameter, sitting in an open cross layout and arranged to line up with the sunset on solstice days. [18]
The Broken Kilometer Walter De Maria New York City,
New York
1979 1979 A grid of 500 polished brass rods, with a total length of 3,280 feet, lying on the floor and illuminated with metal-halide stadium lights. [19]
The Lightning Field Walter De Maria Quemado
New Mexico
1977 1977 400 stainless steel poles standing upright to define a horizontal plane over a one mile by one kilometer area. [20]
The New York Earth Room Walter De Maria New York City,
New York
1977 1977 A 3,600 square foot room filled with 250 cubic yards of soil to a depth of 22 inches. [21]
The Vertical Earth Kilometer Walter De Maria Kassel,
Germany
1977 1977 A five centimeter wide, one kilometer long brass rod inserted vertically into the earth with its top flush to the ground. [22]
Times Square Max Neuhaus New York City,
New York
1977,
2002 reinstalled
2002 Sound emanating from a grate in Times Square on a triangular pedestrian island between 45th and 46th streets. [23]
Interactive map
 
 
 
Dia sites:


Dia locations:

Former sitesEdit

 
Interior of Santa Maria Annunciata in Chiesa Rossa with the fluorescent light installation by Dan Flavin.

There are multiple Dia sites, or long term installations, that were once listed in Dia publications or press releases but are no longer categorized as such. These sites were not necessarily removed from view, for instance The Dan Flavin Art Institute became part of Dia Bridgehampton[13] and Dan Flavin's Untitled (to you, Heiner, with admiration and affection) was moved from Munich, Germany to Dia Beacon.[24]

Site Artist Placement Year Opened Year removed from view Description Ref.
untitled in pink, green, and blue fluorescent light Dan Flavin Kunstmuseum Basel,
Basel, Switzerland
1975 Still on view This permanent, outdoor, fluorescent light installation was installed by Dia and gifted to the Kunstmuseum. [25]
Dream Festival La Monte Young and Marian Zazeela New York City,
New York
1975 1979 Dia gave Young and Zazeela a ten-year commission to produce this festival. presented within Dream House environment, the festival presented the American premier of Young's The Well-Tuned Piano as well as performances by the Theatre of Eternal Music and Pandit Pran Nath.The festival moved to a dedicated Dream House space in 1979 considered a different site. [25]
Untitled Dan Flavin New York City,
New York
1976 1987 For the Whitney Museum of American Art's exhibit 200 years of American Sculpture, Flavin conceived of a long-term fluorescent light installation on a train platform at Grand Central Terminal. The work was beyond the scope of the Whitney exhibition and was instead realized through the support of Dia. [25]
Dia Cologne Various Artists Cologne,
Germany
1980 1983 A gallery run by Dia in Cologne, Germany. It presented exhibitions of works by Blinky Palermo, Lucio Fontana, and Imi Knoebel. Donations for Joseph Beuys' 7000 Eichen, presented at documenta 7 in 1982, were coordinated by Dia here. [25]
Dream House La Monte Young and Marian Zazeela New York City,
New York
1979 1985 This rendition of Dream House stretched over 6 floors and had more than 20 staff members. Located at the former New York Mercantile Exchange building it closed due to the loss of Dia funding following the 1980s oil glut. Installed in 1979, the installation is not opened to the public until 1981. Dia later helped fund another, smaller, rendition of the work in TriBeCa. [25][26][27]
Masjid al-Farah Sheikh Muzaffer Ozak,
Dan Flavin
New York City,
New York
1980 1983 A sufi mosque established by Dia and Sheikh Muzaffer Ozak of the Halveti-Jerrahi Order of Dervishes. In 1982, Dia commissioned, and installed through out the mosque, a series of untitled light works by Dan Flavin. [25]
Fred Sandback Museum Fred Sandback Winchendon,
Massachusetts
1981 1996 A former bank building housing works by Sanback was opened by Dia in 1981 and closed in 1996 by the artist. [25][28][29]
Chamberlain Gardens John Chamberlain Essex,
Connecticut
1982 1984 At Chamberlain's former outdoor studio, Dia maintained a ten-acre garden with installations of his work throughout. [25]
John Chamberlain: Sculpture, An Extended Exhibition John Chamberlain New York City,
New York
1982 1985 At Chamberlain's former Tribeca studio, Dia presented rotating exhibitions of his work. [25]
Dan Flavin Art Institute Dan Flavin Bridgehampton,
New York
1979 building purchased by Dia,
1983 Dan Flavin Art Institute established
Still on view The Dan Flavin Art Institute, nine works by the artist on permanent display, now constitutes part of Dia Bridgehampton. [25][30][13]
155 Mercer Street Various artists New York City,
New York
1986 1996 Space used for programing, particularly rehearsal and performance space for modern choreographers. [25]
Flavin at Chiesa Rossa Dan Flavin Milan,
Italy
1996 Still on view Dia worked with the estate of Dan Flavin and Fondazione Prada to install this fluorescent light workin the church Santa Maria Annunciata in Chiesa Rossa. Flavin died the same year as it was installed. [25]
Beacon Point George Trakas Beacon,
New York
1999 initiated,
2001 site clean-up
2007 artwork inaugurated
Still on view Water access area designed as an artwork including an angling deck, boardwalk, and bulkhead created in collaboration with Scenic Hudson and Minetta Brook. [25][31][30]
Dia at the Hispanic Society of America Various artists New York City,
New York
2007 2011 Dia presented a series of rotating commissions at the Hispanic society including works by Francis Alÿs, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, and Koo Jeong A. [25]
Gramsci Monument Thomas Hirschhorn New York City,
New York
2013 2013 Installed for just one summer at Forest Houses, a New York City Housing Authority development, numerous pavilions were built including an exhibition space, a library, a stage, an art workshop, computer terminals, and a restaurant all managed by local residents. [25]
Puerto Rican Light (Cueva Vientos) Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla Between Guayanilla and Peñuelas,
Puerto Rico
2015 2018 The artists placed Puerto Rican Light (to Jeanie Blake), a 1965 fluorescent light sculpture by Dan Flavin, in a cave in the Puerto Rican jungle which can only be accessed by hiking approximately 2 hours to it, and powered it with the use of solar panels. [25][32][33][30]
Rooftop Urban Park Project Dan Graham New York City,
New York
1981-1991 elements created,
1991 on view as composed whole
2004 located on the roof of the Dia:Chelsea galleries, Graham placed a small urban park containing a pavilion created out of one-way glass, named Two-Way Mirror Cylinder Inside Cube, and a shed for viewing video art. [34][35]
Untitled Dan Flavin New York City,
New York
1996 Disappears from Dia press releases between February 7, 2017[36] and February 24, 2017.[37] Flavin's last artwork using fluorescent light, this site-specific installation was in the two stairwells of Dia's former headquarters at 548 West 22nd Street and is no longer on view. [38]
Untitled (to you, Heiner, with admiration and affection) Dan Flavin Munich,
Germany
1973 Disappears from Dia press releases between May 18, 2015[39] and July 17, 2015.[40] 58 four foot by four foot sculptures made of metal and fluorescent light fixtures. Now installed at Dia Beacon. [41]

Future locationsEdit

Dia has one new location planned. By renovating a retail space in the SoHo section of New York City which Dia already owns, a fourth location will be added to Dia's portfolio in 2022.[3]

Location Placement Year proposed to open Description Ref.
Dia SoHo New York City,
New York
2023 Originally opened in 1982 by Dia as a long-term exhibition space for paintings by Barnett Newman, the gallery has been rented as a retail space since 1989. Located at 77 Wooster Street, the space will be transformed into a 2,500-square-foot gallery for changing exhibitions. [3][25]

AffiliatesEdit

 
The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is one of Dia's 7 affiliate institutions.

Alongside the 11 locations and sites Dia manages, they also maintain relationships with 6 affiliate institutions. Dia collaborated and supported these institutions, either financially or by donating or sharing of artworks, early in each origination's development. Two of the affiliates, City by Michael Heizer and Roden Crater by James Turrell, while being partially funded and supported by Dia since the 70's, are still not completed.[5]

Site[5] Artist Placement Year Description Ref.
Andy Warhol Museum Andy Warhol Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1989 announced,
1994 museum opened
Built in collaboration with the Carnegie Institute and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts as one of the four Carnegie Museums, the museum holds the world's largest collection of art and archival items related to Warhol. [5][42]
Chinati Foundation Various Marfa,
Texas
1978 Began as a collection of works by Donald Judd installed with the help of Dia. [5][43]
City Michael Heizer Garden Valley,
Nevada
1972 begun,
not yet completed
A one and a quarter mile long by one quarter of a mile wide land art piece being partially funded by Dia. [5][44]
Cy Twombly Gallery Cy Twombly Houston,
Texas
1994 An installation of Twombly's work built in collaboration with the Menil Collection. [5][45]
Dream House La Monte Young and Marian Zazeela New York City,
New York
1993 A sound and light installation which Dia helped fund the installation of. [5][46]
Roden Crater James Turrell Painted Desert,
Arizona
1977 land acquired
not yet completed
A large-scale multi-room installation focused on experiencing light located inside an extinct volcanic Cinder cone funded with support by Dia. [5][47]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Dia switched from calling this the Dan Flavin Art Institute and a site, to calling it Dia Bridgehampton and a location between a November 21, 2019 and a January 29, 2020 press release. [11][12]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dia Archived 2017-10-26 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e Visit Our Locations & Sites Archived 2020-05-13 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c Freeman, Nate. The Dia Art Foundation will expand its Chelsea galleries and launch a new SoHo space. Archived 2020-09-04 at the Wayback Machine. Artsy. May 7, 2019. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  4. ^ Admission to Dia's New York City Sites Will Soon Be Free Archived 2020-02-21 at the Wayback Machine. Artforum. September 19, 2019. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i About Dia Archived 2020-05-13 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  6. ^ a b Colacello, Bob. Remains of the Dia Archived 2018-09-12 at the Wayback Machine. Vanity Fair. April 30, 2008. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c Goldstein, Andrew. Is It Time for a Land Art Renaissance? Jessica Morgan on Her Ambitious Vision for Dia in New York and Far, Far Beyond Archived 2020-01-28 at the Wayback Machine. Artnews. May 17, 2019. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  8. ^ a b c d Cooke, Lynne and Govan, Michael. Dia Beacon. ISBN 0-944521-47-9. Dia Art Foundation. 2003. New York. p. 10-11.
  9. ^ a b c d Goldstein, Andrew. ‘There Were Women Working Then, Too’: How Dia Director Jessica Morgan Is Breaking Open the (Male) Canon of Postwar Art Archived 2019-08-24 at the Wayback Machine. Artnews. May 15, 2019. Retrieved May 17, 2020.
  10. ^ Dia Beacon Archived 2020-05-11 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  11. ^ Dia Announces Its 2020 Exhibition Program across Its Eleven Sites and Reopens Dia Chelsea on September 17 Archived 2020-07-19 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  12. ^ New Immersive Sound Installation by Carl Craig Opening at Dia Beacon on March 6, 2020 Archived July 20, 2020, at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  13. ^ a b c Dia Bridgehampton Archived 2020-05-11 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  14. ^ Dia Chelsea Archived 2020-05-11 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  15. ^ Dia Reveals Comprehensive, Multi-Year Plan to Strengthen Mission And Revitalize its Constellation of Sites in New York Archived 2020-07-30 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  16. ^ Joseph Beuys, 7000 Oaks Archived 2020-05-11 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  17. ^ Robert Smithson, Spiral Jetty Archived 2020-05-15 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  18. ^ Nancy Holt, Sun Tunnels Archived 2020-05-11 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  19. ^ Walter De Maria, The Broken Kilometer Archived 2020-05-11 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  20. ^ Walter De Maria, The Lightning Field Archived 2020-05-13 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  21. ^ Walter De Maria, The New York Earth Room Archived 2020-05-11 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  22. ^ Walter De Maria, The Vertical Earth Kilometer Archived 2020-05-11 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  23. ^ Max Neuhaus, Times Square Archived 2020-05-11 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  24. ^ Cascone, Sarah. Dan Flavin Lights Up Dia Beacon With Stunning Subterranean Installation Archived 2020-06-24 at the Wayback Machine. Artnet. May 10, 2016. Retrieved June 22, 2020.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q An Introduction to Dia's Locations and Sites. Dia Art Foundation. pp. 98-105.
  26. ^ Battaglia, Andy. Celebrating 40 years of La Monte Young and Marian Zazeela's Dream House Archived 2020-07-19 at the Wayback Machine. Frieze. October 23, 2015. Retrieved July 21, 2020.
  27. ^ Gordon Matta-Clark: Selected Films and Videos at Dia Center for the Arts Archived 2020-07-22 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. August 21, 1996. Retrieved July 21, 2020.
  28. ^ Dia Art Foundation Changes Name to Dia Center for the Arts Archived 2020-07-22 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. September 21, 1990. Retrieved July 21, 2020.
  29. ^ Fred Sandback Archived 2020-07-22 at the Wayback Machine. Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Retrieved July 21, 2020.
  30. ^ a b c Dia Beacon, Riggio Galleries. floor plan pamphlet. 2017. Dia Art Foundation. rear cover.
  31. ^ Dia Art Foundation Inaugurates Permanent Waterfront Artwork by George Trakas Archived 2020-09-04 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  32. ^ Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla: Puerto Rican Light (Cueva Vientos) Archived 2020-09-04 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  33. ^ Gotthardt, Alexxa. Why a Dan Flavin Work Hidden in a Puerto Rican Cave Makes a Timely Political Statement Archived 2020-09-04 at the Wayback Machine. Artsy. Jun 5, 2017. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  34. ^ Dan Graham: The Rooftop Urban Park Project Archived 2020-07-25 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  35. ^ Dia Art Foundation Announces New Web-based Project by Artist Cecilia Edefalk Archived 2020-07-25 at the Wayback Machine.Dia Art Foundation. November 6, 2009. Retrieved July 25, 2020.
  36. ^ Dia Art Foundation Presents François Chaignaud and Cecilia Bengolea at Dia Beacon Archived 2017-05-22 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  37. ^ Courtney J. Martin to Join Dia's Curatorial Department as Deputy Director and Chief Curator Archived 2020-09-04 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  38. ^ Dan Flavin untitled, 1996 Archived 2017-01-03 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  39. ^ Dia Art Foundation Appoints David Morehouse as Deputy Director of Advancement Archived 2017-01-02 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  40. ^ Dia Art Foundation Presents Robert Ryman at Dia Chelsea Archived 2017-01-02 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  41. ^ Dan Flavin untitled (to you, Heiner, with admiration and affection), 1973 Archived 2019-12-07 at the Wayback Machine. Dia Art Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  42. ^ Museum Archived 2020-05-09 at the Wayback Machine. Andy Warhol Museum. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  43. ^ Mission and History Archived 2020-09-04 at the Wayback Machine. Chinati Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  44. ^ Miranda, Carolina A. What's behind the #ProtectCity campaign for artist Michael Heizer Archived 2019-08-11 at the Wayback Machine. Los Angeles Times. March 24, 2015. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  45. ^ Cy Twombly Gallery Archived 2020-05-13 at the Wayback Machine. Menil Collection. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  46. ^ Dream House Archived 2020-02-18 at the Wayback Machine. MELA Foundation. retrieved May 14, 2020.
  47. ^ About Archived 2020-05-16 at the Wayback Machine. Skystone Foundation. Retrieved May 14, 2020.

External linksEdit