List of Ancient Roman temples

This is a list of ancient Roman temples, built during antiquity by the people of ancient Rome or peoples belonging to the Roman Empire. Roman temples were dedicated to divinities from the Roman pantheon.

Substantial remainsEdit

 
View of the Temple of Romulus, from the Palatine Hill.
 
Roman temple of Vic, part original, with parts restored
 
Ceiling of Temple of Jupiter, Diocletian's Palace, Split
 
Temple of Saturn, Roman Forum, 8 impressive columns and architrave remain standing
 
Capitoleum of Dougga, Tunisia

Most of the best survivals had been converted into churches and mosques. Rural areas in the Islamic world have some good remains, which had been left largely undisturbed. In Spain, some remarkable discoveries (Vic, Cordoba, Barcelona) were made in the 19th century, when old buildings being reconstructed or demolished were found to contain major remains encased in later buildings. In Rome, Pula, and elsewhere some walls incorporated in later buildings have always been evident. In most cases loose pieces of stone have been removed from the site, and some such as capitals may be found in local museums, along with non-architectural items excavated, such as terracotta votive offerings, which are often found in large numbers.

RomeEdit

ElsewhereEdit

Ruins, fragments, bases and excavationsEdit

EnglandEdit

ItalyEdit

RomeEdit

 
Temple of Vespasian and Titus, Rome. As with many temples, only part of the base and three columns survive in situ.

LebanonEdit

 
Part of the Sebasteion complex at Aphrodisias, Turkey

MaltaEdit

 
Ruins of Tas-Silġ, a multi-period sanctuary site containing the remains of a Temple of Juno

RomaniaEdit

Not much remains to be seen, but there were temples at Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa (6),[10] Alburnus Major (2),[10] Apulum,[11] Tibiscum[12] Porolissum[13] and probably Potaissa (suggested by five neighboring altars), as well as other sites.[10]

ScotlandEdit

SloveniaEdit

SpainEdit

SyriaEdit

TunisiaEdit

 
The Capitoline Temple in Dougga

TurkeyEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Wheeler, 93-96
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2006-11-04. Retrieved 2016-03-16. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)(Colchester Museums).
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-06-03. Retrieved 2014-06-24. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)(Roman-Britain).
  4. ^ Edward Robinson (1856). Biblical researches in Palestine and the adjacent regions: a journal of travels in the years 1838 and 1852. J. Murray. pp. 433. Retrieved 17 September 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ George Taylor (1971). The Roman temples of Lebanon: a pictorial guide. Les temples romains au Liban; guide illustré. Dar el-Machreq Publishers. Retrieved 17 September 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Daniel M. Krencker; Willy Zschietzschmann (1938). Römische Tempel in Syrien: nach Aufnahmen und Untersuchungen von Mitgliedern der Deutschen Baalbekexpedition 1901–1904, Otto Puchstein, Bruno Schulz, Daniel Krencker [u.a.] ... W. de Gruyter & Co. Retrieved 17 September 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Testa, Michael (19 March 2002). "New find at Mdina most important so far in old capital". Times of Malta. Archived from the original on 13 April 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ "Rabat - Katidral". Gozo Diocese. Archived from the original on 22 August 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ Sagona, Claudia (2015). The Archaeology of Malta. Cambridge University Press. p. 285. ISBN 9781107006690.
  10. ^ a b c Romanian Temples Archived 2016-03-16 at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ site
  12. ^ image Archived 2016-03-17 at the Wayback Machine
  13. ^ image Archived 2016-03-17 at the Wayback Machine

ReferencesEdit