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Linn County, Iowa

Linn County is a county located in the U.S. state of Iowa. As of the 2010 census, the population was 211,226,[1] making it the second-most populous county in Iowa. The county seat is Cedar Rapids.[2] Linn county is named in honor of Senator Lewis F. Linn of Missouri.[3]

Linn County
Linn County Courthouse
Flag of Linn County
Flag
Map of Iowa highlighting Linn County
Location within the U.S. state of Iowa
Map of the United States highlighting Iowa
Iowa's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 42°04′43″N 91°35′59″W / 42.078611111111°N 91.599722222222°W / 42.078611111111; -91.599722222222
Country United States
State Iowa
Founded1839
Named forLewis Linn
SeatCedar Rapids
Largest cityCedar Rapids
Area
 • Total725 sq mi (1,880 km2)
 • Land717 sq mi (1,860 km2)
 • Water7.6 sq mi (20 km2)  1.1%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total211,226
 • Estimate 
(2018)
225,909
 • Density290/sq mi (110/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district1st
Websitewww.linncounty.org

Linn County is included in the Cedar Rapids, IA Metropolitan Statistical Area.[4]

HistoryEdit

The earliest inhabitants of Linn County, prior to Anglo settlement, were the Sac and Fox tribes. Relations were described by 20th century historians as amicable. Native Americans provided food and furs to whites in exchange for merchandise.[5]

Linn County was created as a named but unorganized area on December 21, 1837, as a part of Wisconsin Territory. It became part of Iowa Territory on July 4, 1838 when the territory was organized.[6] Linn County was organized by the first legislative assembly of the Iowa Territory on January 15, 1839. A site was selected for its first county seat along Indian Creek, and was named Marion, after the Revolutionary War general Francis Marion. As early as 1855, there were debates over moving the county seat to the fast-growing Cedar Rapids, southwest of Marion, but it was not until November 6, 1919, that there were enough votes in favor of the move (9,960 to 4,823).[7] The first rail line was built through Cedar Rapids in 1859, and made the town (and the county) a major commercial hub in eastern Iowa.

Many areas of the county were damaged by the flooding of Cedar River in June 2008.

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 725 square miles (1,880 km2), of which 717 square miles (1,860 km2) is land and 7.6 square miles (20 km2) (1.1%) is water.[8]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
18505,444
186018,947248.0%
187031,08064.0%
188037,23719.8%
189045,30321.7%
190055,39222.3%
191060,7209.6%
192074,00421.9%
193082,33611.3%
194089,1428.3%
1950104,27417.0%
1960136,89931.3%
1970163,21319.2%
1980169,7754.0%
1990168,767−0.6%
2000191,70113.6%
2010211,22610.2%
Est. 2018225,909[9]7.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790–1960[11] 1900–1990[12]
1990–2000[13] 2010–2018[1]

2010 censusEdit

The 2010 census recorded a population of 211,226 in the county, with a population density of 294.4163/sq mi (113.6748/km2). There were 92,251 housing units, of which 86,134 were occupied.[14]

2000 censusEdit

 
2000 Census Age Pyramid for Linn County

As of the census[15] of 2000, there were 191,701 people, 76,753 households, and 50,349 families residing in the county. The population density was 267 people per square mile (103/km²). There were 80,551 housing units at an average density of 112 per square mile (43/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 93.90% White, 2.57% Black or African American, 0.22% Native American, 1.37% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 1.44% from two or more races. 1.42% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 76,753 households out of which 31.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.20% were married couples living together, 9.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.40% were non-families. 27.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.99.

Age spread: 25.30% under the age of 18, 10.10% from 18 to 24, 30.30% from 25 to 44, 22.10% from 45 to 64, and 12.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $46,206, and the median income for a family was $56,494. Males had a median income of $38,525 versus $26,403 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,977. About 4.30% of families and 6.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.60% of those under age 18 and 6.40% of those age 65 or over.

GovernmentEdit

On July 24, 2007, the voters of Linn County approved a measure to change the form of government from a 3-member Board of Supervisors elected at large to a 5-member Board of Supervisors elected by district. The supervisors serve overlapping 4-year terms.[16]

The current supervisors are:

Name District First elected
Stacey Walker District 1 2016
Ben Rogers District 2 2008
Brent Oleson District 3 2008

The Board of Supervisors operate as both the executive and legislative branches of Linn County government. The following departments report directly to the Board of Supervisors: Communications, Community Services, Engineering/Secondary Road, Facilities, Finance and Budget, Human Resources, Information Technology, LIFTS (para-transit), Planning and Development, Policy and Administration, Purchasing, Risk Management, Soil and Water Conservation and Veteran Affairs. Conservation and Public Health report to independent boards appointed by the Board of Supervisors. The Linn County Public Health Department is the only nationally-accredited health department in Iowa. The County Attorney, Auditor, Recorder, Sheriff and Treasurer are elected separately.[17]

Presidential Elections Results
Presidential Elections Results[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 41.3% 48,390 50.3% 58,935 8.4% 9,773
2012 40.2% 47,622 57.9% 68,581 1.9% 2,250
2008 38.5% 43,626 60.0% 68,037 1.5% 1,706
2004 44.7% 49,442 54.6% 60,442 0.8% 856
2000 43.9% 40,417 53.1% 48,897 3.0% 2,750
1996 37.3% 30,958 54.8% 45,497 7.9% 6,580
1992 34.0% 30,215 43.4% 38,567 22.6% 20,103
1988 43.2% 33,129 56.0% 42,993 0.8% 596
1984 51.1% 41,061 48.0% 38,528 0.9% 726
1980 46.4% 36,254 40.8% 31,950 12.8% 10,020
1976 47.8% 36,513 50.1% 38,252 2.1% 1,632
1972 52.8% 36,503 45.4% 31,370 1.9% 1,287
1968 48.0% 30,918 46.4% 29,898 5.6% 3,614
1964 35.2% 21,845 64.7% 40,106 0.1% 78
1960 55.3% 34,200 44.7% 27,614 0.0% 25
1956 60.6% 33,402 39.3% 21,667 0.1% 47
1952 58.7% 31,383 40.8% 21,818 0.5% 240
1948 48.5% 20,881 48.7% 20,995 2.8% 1,222
1944 50.0% 21,293 49.6% 21,123 0.3% 146
1940 54.5% 23,581 45.2% 19,531 0.3% 123
1936 48.1% 19,129 49.6% 19,724 2.4% 953
1932 50.8% 18,733 47.9% 17,693 1.3% 489
1928 68.2% 25,452 31.4% 11,715 0.4% 132
1924 64.5% 22,371 17.1% 5,941 18.4% 6,378
1920 72.0% 20,036 24.9% 6,932 3.1% 853
1916 55.7% 8,212 41.6% 6,131 2.8% 408
1912 32.0% 4,326 40.1% 5,422 27.9% 3,767
1908 54.2% 6,938 42.9% 5,493 2.8% 364
1904 65.4% 8,131 28.9% 3,600 5.7% 709
1900 59.1% 7,745 38.3% 5,019 2.6% 342
1896 57.1% 7,335 41.2% 5,283 1.7% 218

CommunitiesEdit

CitiesEdit

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

Ghost townsEdit

TownshipsEdit

Population rankingEdit

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Linn County.[19]

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)
1 Cedar Rapids City 126,326
2 Marion City 34,768
3 Hiawatha City 7,024
4 Mount Vernon City 4,506
5 Robins City 3,142
6 Center Point City 2,421
7 Lisbon City 2,152
8 Fairfax City 2,123
9 Ely City 1,776
10 Walford (partially in Benton County) City 1,463
11 Central City City 1,257
12 Springville City 1,074
13 Palo City 1,026
14 Walker City 791
15 Alburnett City 673
16 Coggon City 658
17 Bertram City 294
18 Prairieburg City 178

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved July 18, 2014.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 187.
  4. ^ United States Office of Management and Budget. "Update of Statistical Area Definitions and Guidance on Their Uses" (PDF). pp. 5, 36. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 14, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2006.
  5. ^ Brewer, Luther; Barthinus, Wick (1911). History of Linn County Iowa. Chicago: The Pioneer Publishing Company. pp. 10–12.
  6. ^ "WI: Individual County Chronologies". publications.newberry.org. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  7. ^ "History of Linn County". Archived from the original on May 3, 2009.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  9. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 13, 2019.
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 18, 2014.
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 18, 2014.
  12. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 18, 2014.
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 18, 2014.
  14. ^ "Population & Housing Occupancy Status 2010". United States Census Bureau American FactFinder. Retrieved May 19, 2011.
  15. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  16. ^ "Board of Supervisors". Archived from the original on February 18, 2009. Retrieved February 18, 2009.
  17. ^ "Linn County, IA – Official Website | Official Website". www.linncounty.org. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 9, 2018.
  19. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on December 6, 2013. Retrieved July 10, 2016.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 42°04′43″N 91°35′59″W / 42.07861°N 91.59972°W / 42.07861; -91.59972