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Lincoln was a federal electoral district represented in the House of Commons of Canada from 1867 to 1883 and from 1904 to 1997. It was on the Niagara Peninsula in the Canadian province of Ontario. At various times, there was also an electoral district of the same name used in provincial elections.

Lincoln
Ontario electoral district
Defunct federal electoral district
LegislatureHouse of Commons
District created1867, 1903
District abolished1882, 1996
First contested1867
Last contested1993

At various times, the riding included all or parts of the former Lincoln County (including its successor, the Regional Municipality of Niagara). After 1976, it also represented parts of the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth, mainly Stoney Creek. As a suburban riding of Hamilton, it tended to vote Conservative much more often than the city proper.

By the 1997 election, the riding borders and name were changed to Stoney Creek although it included many areas outside that city.

GeographyEdit

It initially consisted of the Townships of Clinton, Grantham, Grimsby, and Louth, and the Town of St. Catharines. It was abolished in 1882 when it was redistributed between Lincoln and Niagara and Wentworth South ridings.

It was recreated from those two ridings in 1903, and defined as consisting of the County of Lincoln.

In 1947, it was defined as consisting of the county of Lincoln, including the city of St. Catharines.

In 1966, it was defined as consisting of

(a) in the County of Lincoln, the southeast part of the City of St. Catharines, and the Townships of Caistor, Clinton, Gainsborough, Grimsby North, Grimsby South, Louth and Niagara;

(b) in the County of Welland, the Townships of Pelham and Thorold.

In 1976, it was defined as consisting of:

(a) in the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth, the Town of Stoney Creek and the part of the City of Hamilton east of Red Hill Creek between Windermere Road in the north and the brow of the Mountain and the limit of the City of Hamilton in the south, and (b) in the Regional Municipality of Niagara, the Towns of Grimsby and Lincoln.

In 1987, the City of Hamilton part of the ridings was redefined to consist of the part of the city south of Queenston Road, east of Redhill Creek and north of the brow of the Niagara Escarpment.

It was abolished in 1996 when it was redistributed between Erie—Lincoln and Stoney Creek ridings.

Members of ParliamentEdit

This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
1st  1867–1868     James Rea Benson Liberal–Conservative
 1868–1872     Thomas Rodman Merritt Liberal
2nd  1872–1874
3rd  1874–1874 James Norris
 1874–1877
 1877–1878
4th  1878–1882     John Charles Rykert Conservative
Riding dissolved into Lincoln and Niagara and Wentworth South
Riding re-created from Lincoln and Niagara and Wentworth South
10th  1904–1908     Edward Arthur Lancaster Conservative
11th  1908–1911
12th  1911–1917
13th  1917–1921     James Dew Chaplin Government (Unionist)
14th  1921–1925     Conservative
15th  1925–1926
16th  1926–1930
17th  1930–1935
18th  1935–1940 Norman Lockhart
19th  1940–1945     National Government
20th  1945–1949     Progressive Conservative
21st  1949–1953     Harry Cavers Liberal
22nd  1953–1957
23rd  1957–1958     John Smith Progressive Conservative
24th  1958–1962
25th  1962–1963     James McNulty Liberal
26th  1963–1965
27th  1965–1968
28th  1968–1972 H. Gordon Barrett
29th  1972–1974     Kenneth Higson Progressive Conservative
30th  1974–1979     William Andres Liberal
31st  1979–1980     Kenneth Higson Progressive Conservative
32nd  1980–1984     Bryce Mackasey Liberal
33rd  1984–1988     Shirley Martin Progressive Conservative
34th  1988–1993
35th  1993–1997     Tony Valeri Liberal
Riding dissolved into Erie—Lincoln and Stoney Creek

Electoral historyEdit

Lincoln, 1867–1882Edit

1867 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal–Conservative James Rea Benson acclaimed
By-election on 13 April 1868

James Benson called to the Senate, 14 March 1868

Party Candidate Votes
Liberal Thomas Rodman Merritt 720
Unknown O.S. Phillips 120
1872 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal Thomas Rodman Merritt 1,118
Unknown J. McKowins 555
1874 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal James Norris 1,493
Unknown T. Clark 1,338
By-election on 17 November 1874

James Norris was unseated, 8 September 1874

Party Candidate Votes
Liberal James Norris 1,406
Unknown Augustus Jukes 1,270
Unknown Reuben Wynne 7
By-election on 9 May 1877

James Norris resigned, April 1877

Party Candidate Votes
Liberal James Norris 1,831
Unknown James Miller 1,746
1878 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative John Charles Rykert 1,893
Liberal James Norris 1,799

Lincoln, 1904–1997Edit

1904 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative Edward Arthur Lancaster 3,558
Liberal E.J. Lovelace 3,240
1908 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative Edward Arthur Lancaster 3,853
Liberal Welland Devaux Woodruff 3,604
1911 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative Edward Arthur Lancaster 4,576
Liberal Edwin John Lovelace 3,023
1917 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Government (Unionist) James Dew Chaplin 9,335
Opposition (Laurier Liberals) Edwin John Lovelace 3,816
1921 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative James Dew Chaplin 8,087
Labour Edwin John Lovelace 6,212
Progressive Arthur Adams Craise 3,066
1925 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative James Dew Chaplin 12,054
Liberal Hamilton Killally Woodruff 5,942
1926 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative James Dew Chaplin 11,475
Liberal Terrence Myles Mccarron 5,555
1930 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative James Dew Chaplin 13,474
Liberal May Louise Greenwood 7,526
1935 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Conservative Norman James Macdonald Lockhart 11,398
Liberal Albert Ernest Coombs 11,135
Reconstruction Howard L. Craise 2,349
Co-operative Commonwealth George Pay 1,224
1940 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
National Government Norman James Macdonald Lockhart 13,331
Liberal John Joseph Bench 12,921
Co-operative Commonwealth John Scott 2,443
1945 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Progressive Conservative Norman James Macdonald Lockhart 15,911
Liberal Edward Frank McCordick 10,962
Co-operative Commonwealth Allen E. Schroeder 4,540
Labor–Progressive Thomas Wakefield Dealy 1,514
1949 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal Harry Cavers 17,407
Progressive Conservative C. Bruce Hill 14,038
Co-operative Commonwealth Allen Eugene Schroeder 5,793
Independent Howard Prentice 742
1953 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal Harry Cavers 16,113
Progressive Conservative Romaine Kay Ross 14,694
Co-operative Commonwealth Ralph H. Frayne 4,575
Christian Liberal Howard A. Prentice 1,505
1957 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Progressive Conservative John Smith 25,409
Liberal Harry Cavers 15,794
Co-operative Commonwealth Auldham Roy Petrie 4,829
Social Credit Howard Prentice 2,233
1958 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Progressive Conservative John Smith 29,958
Liberal Harry Cavers 15,063
Co-operative Commonwealth Auldham Roy Petrie 4,978
Social Credit Howard Prentice 949
1962 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal James C. McNulty 23,386
Progressive Conservative John Smith 20,445
Social Credit Herbert Heppner 5,262
New Democratic Rose Cookson 5,130
1963 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal James C. McNulty 25,902
Progressive Conservative Romaine K. Ross 21,345
New Democratic Rose Cookson 5,315
Social Credit James R. Walters 2,841
1965 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal James C. McNulty 25,820
Progressive Conservative Joe Reid 19,324
New Democratic Arthur Matti Peltomaa 8,395
Social Credit George S. Mallory 1,913
1968 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal H. Gordon Barrett 13,328
Progressive Conservative Kenneth Higson 12,692
New Democratic John Martin 6,763
1972 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Progressive Conservative Kenneth Higson 16,840
Liberal H. Gordon Barrett 13,562
New Democratic Ron Leavens 6,714
Social Credit Jim Walters 612
1974 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal William Andres 17,499
Progressive Conservative Kenneth Higson 14,221
New Democratic Ron Leavens 6,548
Social Credit James Robert Walters 611
1979 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Progressive Conservative Kenneth Higson 19,612
Liberal Norm Marshall 15,026
New Democratic Ken Lee 13,400
Marxist–Leninist Don McLean 151
1980 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Liberal Bryce Mackasey 17,449
Progressive Conservative Kenneth Higson 16,741
New Democratic Kenneth I. Lee 13,500
Marxist–Leninist Don McLean 133
1984 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Progressive Conservative Shirley Martin 26,318
Liberal Joseph Macaluso 14,646
New Democratic John Mayer 11,888
Green Robert A. Keddy 345
Independent Larry E. Johnston 171
Independent Ann Stasiuk 121
Social Credit A. J. Sid Hamelin 120
1988 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes
Progressive Conservative Shirley Martin 19,955
Liberal John Munro 19,517
New Democratic John Mayer 9,037
Christian Heritage Peggy Humby 2,742
Independent Albert Papazian 280
Independent David Olchowecki 76
Independent Ann Stasiuk 67
Independent André Vachon 28
1993 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % Expenditures
Liberal Tony Valeri 29,048 52.19 $48,491
Reform Andy Sweck 14,325 25.74 $36,455
     Progressive Conservative Jim Merritt 8,731 15.69 $43,063
New Democratic Peter Cassidy 2,182 3.92 $16,976
National Brian Dolby 935 1.68 $3,164
Natural Law Cynthia Marchand 307 0.55 $200
     Non-Affiliated Ken Morningstar 128 0.23 $247
Total valid votes 55,656 100.00
Total rejected ballots 544
Turnout 56,200 72.08
Electors on the lists 77,974
Source: Thirty-fifth General Election, 1993: Official Voting Results, Published by the Chief Electoral Officer of Canada. Financial figures taken from official contributions and expenses provided by Elections Canada.

External linksEdit