Lin Chen-kuo

Lin Chen-kuo (Chinese: 林振國; pinyin: Lín Zhènguó; born 9 December 1937) is a Taiwanese politician who served as Minister of Finance between 1993 and 1996. He later chaired the Taiwan–Hong Kong Economic and Cultural Co-operation Council from 2010 to 2013.

Lin Chen-kuo
林振國
Chairperson of the Taiwan–Hong Kong Economic and Cultural Co-operation Council
In office
May 2010 – 15 April 2013
Preceded byOffice established
Succeeded byJohnnason Liu
Minister of Finance of the Republic of China
In office
27 February 1993 – 10 June 1996
Preceded byBai Pei-ying
Succeeded byPaul Chiu
Personal details
Born (1937-12-09) 9 December 1937 (age 83)
NationalityRepublic of China
Alma materNational Taiwan University

Early life and careerEdit

Lin was born in 1937. His father, who had moved to Taiwan with an elder brother, was killed in the 228 Incident. As a result, an aunt helped his mother raise Lin and his eight siblings. Under their influence, Lin became a Christian at a young age. Though his grades were good, Lin did not do well on the university admissions exam. After further study, Lin was eventually admitted to National Taiwan University and graduated with a degree in economics. He then started work as a teacher's assistant, but expressed a desire to go into the seminary. His mother convinced Lin to continue teaching at NTU instead.[1]

Political careerEdit

Shirley Kuo found Lin his first government job. He later led the finance departments of Taipei City Government and Taiwan Provincial Government.[1] He was named finance minister under Premier Lien Chan in February 1993.[2][3] Lin stepped down in June 1996, accepting an appointment as minister without portfolio.[4] He later served as president of the China External Trade Development Council,[5][6] leaving that position to head the newly established Taiwan Asset Management Company [zh].[7][8] In November 2009, Lin was named to the board of the Taiwan High Speed Rail Corporation, serving concurrently as chair of the company's audit committee.[9][10] In 2010, the Taiwan–Hong Kong Economic and Cultural Co-operation Council was founded, and Lin became its first chairman.[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "林振國 × 紀惟明 最美的事" (PDF) (in Chinese). Good TV. Retrieved 24 September 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Lien Chan confirmado como nuevo Primer Ministro por el Legislativo". Noticas (in Spanish). Retrieved 24 September 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "Lien Chan: Nuevo Primer Ministro de la República de China". Noticas (in Spanish). 1 May 1993. Retrieved 24 September 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Anuncian integración del nuevo Gabinete". Noticas (in Spanish). 16 June 1996. Retrieved 24 September 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "CETRA interesada en desarrollar mercados latinoamericanos". Noticas (in Spanish). 26 December 1998. Retrieved 24 September 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ "República de China busca fortalecer cooperación económica con Polonia". Noticas (in Spanish). 26 June 1999. Retrieved 24 September 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Chou, Stanley (23 December 2000). "Bankers' group prepares AMC". Taipei Times. Retrieved 24 September 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ Chou, Stanley (10 February 2001). "Asset company expected in March". Taipei Times. Retrieved 24 September 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ Huang, Joyce (11 November 2009). "Government takes charge at THSRC". Taipei Times. Retrieved 24 September 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ Chen, Kevin (16 July 2010). "THSRC corporate 'fat cats' go on voluntary diet". Taipei Times. Retrieved 24 September 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ "HK-Taiwan trade office to conduct its second meeting". Taipei Times. 9 August 2011. Retrieved 24 September 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)