Lethbridge (provincial electoral district)

Lethbridge was a provincial electoral district in Alberta mandated to return a single member to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1905 to 1909, and again from 1921 to 1971.[1]

Lethbridge
Alberta electoral district
Defunct provincial electoral district
LegislatureLegislative Assembly of Alberta
District created1905
District abolished1909
District re-created1921
District re-abolished1971
First contested1905
Last contested1967

HistoryEdit

Members of the Legislative Assembly for Lethbridge
Assembly Years Member Party
1st  1905–1906     Leverett George DeVeber Liberal
 1906–1909 William Charles Simmons
See Lethbridge District electoral district from 1909-1913
and Lethbridge City electoral district from 1909-1921
5th  1921–1926     John Smith Stewart Independent
6th  1926–1930     Andrew Smeaton Labor
7th  1930–1935
8th  1935–1937     Hans E. Wight Social Credit
 1937–1940     Peter M. Campbell Independent
9th  1940–1944
10th  1944–1948     John C. Landeryou Social Credit
11th  1948–1952
12th  1952–1955
13th  1955–1959
14th  1959–1963
15th  1963–1967
16th  1967–1971
See Lethbridge-East electoral district from 1971-Present
and Lethbridge-West electoral district from 1971-Present

The riding has existed twice, from 1905 to 1909, and again from 1921 to 1971. The Lethbridge electoral district was founded as one of the original 25 electoral districts contested in the 1905 Alberta general election upon Alberta joining Confederation in September 1905. The electoral district was a continuation of the Lethbridge electoral district responsible for returning a single member to the Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories from 1891 to 1905.[2]

In 1905, the Lethbridge electoral district covered a large patch of southern Alberta and was subsequently broken into Lethbridge District and Lethbridge City in 1909. After Lethbridge District was broken up into Taber and Little Bow in 1913, Lethbridge City was all that remained, using the Lethbridge name; in 1921 Lethbridge was reformed after City was dropped from the name.

The Lethbridge electoral district was abolished in the 1971 electoral district re-distribution, and the territory was formed into Lethbridge-East and Lethbridge-West electoral districts.

The riding was named after the Southern Alberta City of Lethbridge.

RepresentationEdit

Liberal Leverett George DeVeber was elected as the first representative for the Lethbridge electoral district in 1905, DeVeber had previously held the Lethbridge seat in the Northwest Territories Legislature from 1898 to 1905.[2][3] DeVeber's time as the representative was short as he was appointed to the Senate on March 8, 1906.[4]

Election resultsEdit

1905 general electionEdit

1905 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Leverett George DeVeber 639 56.55%
Conservative William Carlos Ives 491 43.45%
Total 1,130
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined N/A
Eligible electors / Turnout N/A N/A
Liberal pickup new district.
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1905 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1906 by-electionEdit

Alberta provincial by-election, April 12, 1906
Upon Leverett George DeVeber's appointment to the Senate of Canada on March 8, 1906
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal William Charles Simmons 543 43.90%
Labor Frank Henry Sherman 463 37.43%
Conservative A. E. Keffer 231 18.67%
Total 1,237
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined N/A
Eligible electors / Turnout N/A N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Source(s)
"By-elections". Elections Alberta. Retrieved May 26, 2020.

1921 general electionEdit

1921 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Independent John Smith Stewart 2,252 62.11%
Labor John Marsh 1,374 37.89%
Total 3,626
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined N/A
Eligible electors / Turnout 5,549 65.35%
Independent pickup new district.
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1921 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1926 general electionEdit

1926 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
±%
Labor Andrew Smeaton 1,584 37.11% 1,962 -0.78%
Conservative Richard R. Davidson 1,459 34.18% 1,713
Liberal Walter S. Galbraith 1,225 28.70%
Total 4,268
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 273
Eligible electors / Turnout 6,353 71.48% 6.13%
Labor gain from Independent Swing -10.64%
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1926 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Instant-runoff voting requires a candidate to receive a plurality (greater than 50%) of the votes.
As no candidate received a plurality of votes, the bottom candidate was eliminated and their 2nd place votes were applied to both other candidates until one received a plurality.

1930 general electionEdit

1930 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
±%
Labor Andrew Smeaton 2,036 43.89% 2,238 6.78%
Independent William D. L. Hardie 1,598 34.45% 1,978
Independent Robert Barrowman 1,005 21.66%
Total 4,639
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 308
Eligible electors / Turnout 7,377 67.06% -4.42%
Labor hold Swing 3.26%
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1930 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Instant-runoff voting requires a candidate to receive a plurality (greater than 50%) of the votes.
As no candidate received a plurality of votes, the bottom candidate was eliminated and their 2nd place votes were applied to both other candidates until one received a plurality.

1935 general electionEdit

1935 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit Hans E. Wight 3,700 55.71%
Liberal Robert Barrowman 1,946 29.30%
Labor Andrew Smeaton 654 9.85% -34.04%
Conservative G. W. Green 341 5.13%
Total 6,641
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 182
Eligible electors / Turnout 8,360 81.61% 14.56%
Social Credit gain from Labor Swing 8.48%
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1935 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1937 by-electionEdit

Alberta provincial by-election, December 2, 1937
Upon the resignation of Hans E. Wight
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Independent Movement Peter M. Campbell 4,099 55.56%
Social Credit A. J. Burnap 3,279 44.44% -11.27%
Total valid votes 7,378
Rejected, spoiled, and declined
Electors / Turnout
Independent Movement gain from Social Credit Swing N/A
Source(s)
"By-elections". Elections Alberta. Retrieved May 26, 2020.

1940 general electionEdit

1940 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Independent Movement Peter M. Campbell 4,318 61.01% 5.55%
Social Credit A. E. Smith 2,760 38.99% -5.45%
Total 7,078
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 274
Eligible electors / Turnout 8,815 83.40% 1.79%
Independent Movement hold Swing -2.20%
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1940 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1944 general electionEdit

1944 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes
1st count
% Votes
final count
±%
Social Credit John C. Landeryou 2,367 37.59% 2,692 -1.40%
Independent David Horton Elton 2,247 35.68% 2,388
Co-operative Commonwealth B. F. Tanner 1,464 23.25%
Labor–Progressive Eugene Scully 219 3.48%
Total 6,297
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 42
Eligible electors / Turnout 9,190 68.98% -14.43%
Social Credit gain from Independent Movement Swing -10.05%
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1944 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Instant-runoff voting requires a candidate to receive a plurality (greater than 50%) of the votes.
As no candidate received a plurality of votes, the bottom candidate was eliminated and their 2nd place votes were applied to both other candidates until one received a plurality.

1948 general electionEdit

1948 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit John C. Landeryou 3,829 54.40% 16.82%
Liberal H. B. McLaughlin 1,768 25.12%
Co-operative Commonwealth Emil S. Vaselenak 1,441 20.47% -2.77%
Total 7,038
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 507
Eligible electors / Turnout 11,611 64.98% -4.00%
Social Credit hold Swing 13.69%
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1948 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1952 general electionEdit

1952 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit John C. Landeryou 4,975 72.35% 17.95%
Liberal Rex J. Tennant 1,901 27.65% 2.53%
Total 6,876
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 658
Eligible electors / Turnout 14,018 53.75% -11.24%
Social Credit hold Swing 7.71%
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1952 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1955 general electionEdit

1955 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit John C. Landeryou 4,788 50.28% -22.07%
Liberal Alan Cullen 3,361 35.30% 7.65%
Conservative C.J. Black 883 9.27%
Co-operative Commonwealth James E. Helwig 490 5.15%
Total 9,522
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 418
Eligible electors / Turnout 15,635 63.58% 9.83%
Social Credit hold Swing -14.86%
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1955 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1959 general electionEdit

1959 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit John C. Landeryou 7,250 62.01% 11.72%
Progressive Conservative Thomas Spanos 2,917 24.95%
Liberal Robery Henry Jeacock 1,525 13.04% -22.25%
Total 11,692
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 45
Eligible electors / Turnout 18,119 64.78% 1.20%
Social Credit hold Swing 11.04%
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1959 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1963 general electionEdit

1963 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit John C. Landeryou 6,975 60.23% -1.78%
Liberal Alan Cullen 3,786 32.69% 19.65%
New Democratic James Taylor 820 7.08%
Total 11,581
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 34
Eligible electors / Turnout 20,117 57.74% -7.04%
Social Credit hold Swing -4.76%
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1963 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1967 general electionEdit

1967 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit John C. Landeryou 6,155 44.42% -15.80%
Progressive Conservative Wilfred Browns 4,128 29.79%
Liberal John I. Boras 2,237 16.15% -16.55%
New Democratic Klaas Buijert 1,335 9.64% 2.55%
Total 13,855
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 49
Eligible electors / Turnout 21,449 64.82% 7.09%
Social Credit hold Swing -6.45%
Source(s)
Source: "Lethbridge Official Results 1967 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

Plebiscite resultsEdit

1923 prohibition plebisciteEdit

Options presented on the ballot Votes[5] %
(a) Prohibition - Meaning thereby a continuance and development of present Liquor Legislation; that is, meaning the Abolition of the Sale of all Liquors excepting for strictly Medicinal Sacramental, Manufacturing and Scientific Purposes. 1,342 %
(b) Licensed Sale of Beer - Meaning thereby, the Sale of Beer in Licensed Hotels and other Premises, as provided in the proposed Temperance Act. 56 %
(c) Government Sale of Beer - Meaning thereby, the Sale of Beer by or through Government Vendors for consumption in Private Residences under Government Control and Regulations - other Liquors to be sold through Doctor's Prescription for Medicinal Purposes. 53 %
(d) Government Sale of All Liquors - Meaning thereby, the Sale of all Liquors by or through Government Vendors. Beer to be consumed on Licensed Premises and in Private Residences. Wines and Spirits to be purchased in limited quantities under permit issued by the government, under Government Control and Regulations. 3,157 %
Total 4,914 100%
Spoiled Ballots 307

1948 Electrification PlebisciteEdit

District results from the first province wide plebiscite on electricity regulation.

Option A Option B
Are you in favour of the generation and distribution of electricity being continued by the Power Companies? Are you in favour of the generation and distribution of electricity being made a publicly owned utility administered by the Alberta Government Power Commission?
4,237     64.90% 2,291     35.10%
Province wide result: Option A passed.

1957 liquor plebisciteEdit

1957 Alberta liquor plebiscite results: Lethbridge[6]
Question A: Do you approve additional types of outlets for the
sale of beer, wine and spirituous liquor subject to a local vote?
Ballot Choice Votes %
No 4,119 50.66%
Yes 4,012 49.34%
Total Votes 8,131 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 66
15,974 Eligible Electors, Turnout 51.32%

On October 30, 1957 a stand-alone plebiscite was held province wide in all 50 of the then current provincial electoral districts in Alberta. The government decided to consult Alberta voters to decide on liquor sales and mixed drinking after a divisive debate in the Legislature. The plebiscite was intended to deal with the growing demand for reforming antiquated liquor control laws.[7]

The plebiscite was conducted in two parts. Question A asked in all districts, asked the voters if the sale of liquor should be expanded in Alberta, while Question B asked in a handful of districts within the corporate limits of Calgary and Edmonton asked if men and woman were allowed to drink together in establishments.[6]

Province wide Question A of the plebiscite passed in 33 of the 50 districts while Question B passed in all five districts. Lethbridge and Wetaskiwin were the only cities in Alberta to vote against the proposal. It was defeated by the narrowest margins with polls showing a clear split between the north and south sections of the city.[7] The voter turnout in the district was well above the province wide average of 46% with well over half the electors turning out to vote.[6]

Official district returns were released to the public on December 31, 1957.[6] The Social Credit government in power at the time did not considered the results binding.[8] However the results of the vote led the government to repeal all existing liquor legislation and introduce an entirely new Liquor Act.[9]

Municipal districts lying inside electoral districts that voted against the Plebiscite such as Lethbridge were designated Local Option Zones by the Alberta Liquor Control Board and considered effective dry zones, business owners that wanted a license had to petition for a binding municipal plebiscite in order to be granted a license.[10]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Election results for Lethbridge". abheritage.ca. Heritage Community Foundation. Archived from the original on 8 December 2010. Retrieved 22 May 2020.
  2. ^ a b "North-West Territories: Council and Legislative Assembly, 1876-1905" (PDF). Saskatchewan Archives. p. 27. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-09-28. Retrieved 2007-09-30.
  3. ^ "Lethbridge Official Results 1905 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Foundation. Archived from the original on 2011-06-12. Retrieved 2008-08-16.
  4. ^ "The Hon. Leverett George DeVeber, Senator". Parlinfo. Parliament of Canada. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  5. ^ "Official Referendum Vote In Lethbridge". Lethbridge Daily Herald. November 16, 1923. p. 1.
  6. ^ a b c d Alberta Gazette. 53 (December 31 ed.). Government of Alberta. 1957. pp. 2, 247–2, 249.
  7. ^ a b "Albertans Vote 2 to 1 For More Liquor Outlets". Vol L No 273. The Lethbridge Herald. October 31, 1957. pp. 1–2.
  8. ^ "No Sudden Change In Alberta Drinking Habits Is Seen". Vol L No 267. The Lethbridge Herald. October 24, 1957. p. 1.
  9. ^ "Entirely New Act On Liquor". Vol LI No 72. The Lethbridge Herald. March 5, 1968. p. 1.
  10. ^ "Bill 81". Alberta Bills 12th Legislature 1st Session. Government of Alberta. 1958. p. 40.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 49°41′38″N 112°49′59″W / 49.694°N 112.833°W / 49.694; -112.833