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The back of the Lenin Peace Prize Medal

The International Lenin Peace Prize (Russian: международная Ленинская премия мира, mezhdunarodnaya Leninskaya premiya mira) was a Soviet Union award named in honor of Vladimir Lenin. It was awarded by a panel appointed by the Soviet government, to notable individuals whom the panel indicated had "strengthened peace among comrades". It was founded as the International Stalin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples, but was renamed the International Lenin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples (Russian: Международная Ленинская премия «За укрепление мира между народами», Mezhdunarodnaya Leninskaya premiya «za ukrepleniye mira mezhdu narodami» ) as a result of de-Stalinization. Unlike the Nobel Prize, the Lenin Peace Prize was usually awarded to several people a year rather than to just one individual. The prize was mainly awarded to prominent Communists and supporters of the Soviet Union who were not Soviet citizens. Notable recipients include: W. E. B. Du Bois, Fidel Castro, Salvador Allende, Mikis Theodorakis, Sean MacBride, Angela Davis, Pablo Picasso, Oscar Niemeyer, Faiz Ahmad Faiz, Abdul Sattar Edhi and Nelson Mandela.

Contents

HistoryEdit

The prize was created as the International Stalin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples on December 21, 1949 by executive order of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet in honor of Joseph Stalin's seventieth birthday (although this was after his seventy-first).

Following Nikita Khrushchev's denunciation of Stalin in 1956 during the Twentieth Party Congress, the prize was renamed on September 6 as the International Lenin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples. All previous recipients were asked to return their Stalin Prizes so they could be replaced by the renamed Lenin Prize. By a decision of Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR of December 11, 1989, the prize was renamed the International Lenin Peace Prize.[1] Two years later, after the collapse of USSR in 1991, the Russian government, as the successor state to the defunct Soviet Union, ended the award program. The Lenin Peace Prize is regarded as a counterpart to the existing Nobel Peace Prize.

The International Lenin Prize should not be confused with the International Peace Prize, awarded by the World Peace Council. In 1941 the Soviet Union created the Stalin Prize (later renamed the USSR State Prize), which was awarded annually to accomplished Soviet writers, composers, artists and scientists.

Stalin Prize recipientsEdit

Year Picture Name Occupation Country Notes
1950 Eugénie Cotton[2][3]
(1881–1967)
Scientist, President of the Women's International Democratic Federation   France Awarded 6 April 1951
1950   Heriberto Jara Corona[2][3]
(1879–1968)
Politician, revolutionary   Mexico Awarded 6 April 1951
1950   Hewlett Johnson[2][3]
(1974–1966)
Priest, Dean of Manchester (1924–1931), Dean of Canterbury (1931–1963)   United Kingdom Awarded 6 April 1951
1950   Frédéric Joliot-Curie[2][3]
(1900–1958)
Physicist, Member of the French Academy of Sciences, Professor at the Collège de France, President of the World Peace Council (1950–1958), Nobel laureate in Chemistry (1935)   France Awarded 6 April 1951
1950 Arthur Moulton[2][3]
(1873–1962)
Episcopal bishop   United States Declined
1950   Pak Chong-ae[2][3]
(1907–?)
Politician, Chairwoman of the Korean Democratic Women's League (1945–1965)   North Korea Awarded 6 April 1951
1950   Soong Ching-ling[2][3]
(1893–1981)
Politician, Vice President of China (1949–1954; 1959–1975)   China Awarded 6 April 1951
1951   Jorge Amado[4][5][6]
(1912–2001)
Writer, Member of the Brazilian Academy of Letters (1961–2001)   Brazil Awarded 20 December 1951
1951 Monica Felton[4][5]
(1906–1970)
Town planner, feminist, politician   United Kingdom Awarded 20 December 1951
1951   Guo Moruo[7][4]
(1892–1978)
Writer, scientist, politician, President of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (1949–1978)   China Awarded 20 December 1951
1951   Pietro Nenni[4][5]
(1891–1980)
Politician, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Italy (1946–1947; 1968–1969), Deputy Prime Minister of Italy (1963–1968)   Italy Awarded 20 December 1951
1951   Oyama Ikuo[4][5]
(1889–1955)
Politician, Member of the House of Councillors of Japan   Japan Awarded 20 December 1951
1951   Anna Seghers[4][5]
(1900–1983)
Writer   East Germany Awarded 20 December 1951
1952   Johannes R. Becher[5][8]
(1891–1958)
Writer   East Germany Awarded 20 December 1952
1952   Elisa Branco [pt][5][8]
(1912–2001)
Politician, Vice President of the Council of Brazilian Advocates for Peace (1949–1960)   Brazil Awarded 20 December 1952
1952   Ilya Ehrenburg[5][8]
(1891–1967)
Writer, journalist   Soviet Union Awarded 20 December 1952
1952   James Gareth Endicott[5][8]
(1898–1993)
Clergyman   Canada Awarded 20 December 1952
1952 Yves Farge[5][8]
(1899–1953)
Journalist, politician   France Awarded 20 December 1952
1952   Halldór Laxness[9]
(1902–1998)
Writer, Nobel laureate in Literature (1955)   Iceland Awarded 20 December 1952
1952 Saifuddin Kitchlew[5][8]
(1888–1963)
Barrister, politician, Vice President of the World Peace Council (1955–1959), President of the All-India Peace Council   India Awarded 20 December 1952
1952   Paul Robeson[5][8]
(1898–1976)
Singer, actor   United States Awarded 20 December 1952
1953   Andrea Andreen[5][10]
(1888–1972)
Physician, educator, Chairman of the Swedish Women's Left-Wing Association (1946–1964), Vice President of the Women's International Democratic Federation   Sweden Awarded 12 December 1953
1953 John Desmond Bernal[7][10]
(1901–1971)
Scientist, Professor at Birkbeck College, University of London, Fellow of the Royal Society (1937), President of the World Peace Council (1959–1965)   United Kingdom Awarded 12 December 1953
1953   Isabelle Blume[7][10]
(1892–1975)
Politician, Member of the Belgian Chamber of Representatives (1936–1954), President of the World Peace Council (1965–1969)   Belgium Awarded 12 December 1953
1953   Pierre Cot[10]
(1895–1977)
Politician, Member of the National Assembly of France (1928–1940)   France Awarded 12 December 1953
1953 Howard Fast[5][10]
(1914–2003)
Writer   United States Awarded 12 December 1953
1953 Andrea Gaggiero [it][5][10]
(1916–1988)
Priest   Italy Awarded 12 December 1953
1953   Leon Kruczkowski[5][10]
(1900–1962)
Writer   Poland Awarded 12 December 1953
1953   Pablo Neruda[5][6][10]
(1904–1973)
Poet, diplomat, Nobel laureate in Literature (1971)   Chile Awarded 12 December 1953
1953 Nina Popova [ru][5][10]
(1908–1994)
Politician, Secretary of the All-Union Central Council of Trade Unions (1945–1957)   Soviet Union Awarded 12 December 1953
1953 Sahib Singh Sokhey[5][10]
(1887–1971)
Biochemist, Member of the Indian Academy of Sciences, Assistant Director General of the World Health Organization (1949–1952)   India Awarded 12 December 1953
1954 André Bonnard [fr][11][12]
(1888–1959)
Scholar, writer, Professor at the University of Lausanne    Switzerland Awarded 18 December 1954
1954   Bertolt Brecht[11][12]
(1898–1956)
Playwright, poet, theatre director   Austria (citizenship)
  East Germany (residence)
Awarded 18 December 1954
1954   Nicolás Guillén[6][11][13]
(1902–1989)
Poet   Cuba Awarded 18 December 1954
1954 Felix Iversen[11][12]
(1887–1973)
Mathematician, Professor at the University of Helsinki, Chairman of the Peace Union of Finland   Finland Awarded 18 December 1954
1954   Thakin Kodaw Hmaing[11][12]
(1876–1964)
Poet   Burma Awarded 18 December 1954
1954 Alain Le Léap [fr][11]
(1905–1986)
Trade unionist, General Secretary of the General Confederation of Labour (1948–1957)   France Awarded 18 December 1954
1954   Prijono[11][12]
(1907–1969)
Academic, politician, Minister of Culture and Education of Indonesia (1957–1966)   Indonesia Awarded 18 December 1954
1954   Denis Pritt[11][14]
(1887–1972)
Barrister, politician, Member of Parliament of the United Kingdom (1935–1950)   United Kingdom Awarded 18 December 1954
1954   Baldomero Sanín Cano[6][11]
(1861–1957)
Essayist, linguist, journalist   Colombia Awarded 18 December 1954
1955   Muhammad al-Ashmar[15][16]
(1892–1960)
Rebel commander, politician   Syria Awarded 9 December 1955
1955   Lázaro Cárdenas[15][16]
(1895–1970)
General, politician, President of Mexico (1934–1940)   Mexico Awarded 9 December 1955
1955 Ragnar Forbech [no][15][16]
(1894–1975)
Priest, Chaplain of Oslo Cathedral (1947–1964)   Norway Awarded 9 December 1955
1955   Seki Akiko[15][16]
(1899–1973)
Singer   Japan Awarded 9 December 1955
1955   Tôn Đức Thắng[15][16]
(1888–1980)
Politician, President of North Vietnam (1969–1976), President of Vietnam (1976–1980)   North Vietnam Awarded 9 December 1955
1955   Karl Joseph Wirth[15][16]
(1879–1956)
Politician, Chancellor of Germany (1921–1922)   West Germany Awarded 9 December 1955
Unknown year   Martin Andersen Nexø[17]
(1869–1954)
Writer   Denmark


Lenin Prize recipientsEdit

Year Picture Name Occupation Country Notes
1957   Louis Aragon[14]
(1897–1982)
Poet   France
1957   Emmanuel d'Astier de La Vigerie[14]
(1900–1969)
Journalist, politician, Member of the National Assembly of France (1945–1958)   France
1957   Heinrich Brandweiner [de][14]
(1910–1997)
Jurist, Chairman of the Peace Council of Austria   Austria
1957   Danilo Dolci[14][18]
(1924–1997)
Social activist, educator, sociologist   Italy
1957   María Rosa Oliver[6][14]
(1898–1977)
Writer, essayist   Argentina
1957   C. V. Raman[14]
(1888–1970)
Physicist, Professor at the University of Calcutta, President of the Indian Academy of Sciences (1934–1970)   India
1957 Udakendawala Siri Saranankara Thero [nl][14]
(1902–1966)
Buddhist monk   Ceylon
1957   Nikolai Tikhonov[14]
(1896–1979)
Writer, Chairman of the Soviet Peace Committee (1949–1979)   Soviet Union
1958   Josef Hromádka[7][19]
(1889–1969)
Protestant theologian, founder of the Christian Peace Conference   Czechoslovakia
1958   Artur Lundkvist[7][20]
(1906–1991)
Writer, literary critic, Member of the Swedish Academy (1968–1991)   Sweden
1958 Louis Saillant [fr][7]
(1906–1991)
Trade unionist, General Secretary of the World Federation of Trade Unions (1945–1969)   France
1958 Kaoru Yasui [ja][7][21]
(1907–1980)
Jurist, scholar, Professor at the University of Tokyo, Chairman of the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs (1954–1965)   Japan
1958   Arnold Zweig[7][22]
(1887–1968)
Writer   East Germany
1959   Otto Buchwitz [de][23][24]
(1879–1964)
Politician, Member of the Reichstag (1924–1933), Member of the Volkskammer (1946–1964)   East Germany Awarded 30 April 1959
1959   W. E. B. Du Bois[23][24]
(1868–1963)
Sociologist, historian, civil rights activist   United States Awarded 30 April 1959
1959   Nikita Khrushchev[23][24]
(1894–1971)
Politician, First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (1953–1964)   Soviet Union Awarded 30 April 1959
1959 Ivor Montagu[23][24]
(1904–1984)
Filmmaker, critic   United Kingdom Awarded 30 April 1959
1959 Kostas Varnalis[23][24]
(1884–1974)
Poet   Greece Awarded 30 April 1959
1960 Laurent Casanova[25][26]
(1906–1972)
Politician, Member of the National Assembly of France (1945–1958)   France Awarded 3 May 1960
1960   Cyrus S. Eaton[25][26]
(1883–1979)
Industrialist   Canada
  United States
Awarded 3 May 1960
1960   Oleksandr Korniychuk[citation needed]
(1905–1972)
Playwright   Soviet Union Awarded 3 May 1960
1960 Aziz Sharif[26][27]
(1904–1990)
Politician, Chairman of the Peace Partisans Organization of Iraq[28]   Iraq Awarded 3 May 1960
1960   Sukarno[25][26]
(1901–1970)
Politician, President of Indonesia (1945–1967)   Indonesia Awarded 3 May 1960
1961   Fidel Castro[29][30]
(1926–2016)
Politician, revolutionary, Prime Minister of Cuba (1959–1976), President of Cuba (1976–2008)   Cuba Awarded 30 April 1961
1961 Ostap Dłuski [pl][29][30]
(1892–1964)
Politician, Member of the Sejm (1961–1964)   Poland Awarded 30 April 1961
1961   Bill Morrow[29][30]
(1888–1980)
Politician, Member of the Australian Senate (1947–1953)   Australia Awarded 30 April 1961
1961 Rameshwari Nehru[29][30]
(1886–1966)
Social worker, founder of the All India Women's Conference   India Awarded 30 April 1961
1961   Mihail Sadoveanu[29][30]
(1880–1961)
Writer   Romania Awarded 30 April 1961
1961 Antoine Tabet[29][30]
(1907–1964)
Architect, Chairman of the Lebanese National Peace Council[31]   Lebanon Awarded 30 April 1961
1961   Ahmed Sékou Touré[29][30]
(1922–1984)
Politician, President of Guinea (1958–1984)   Guinea Awarded 30 April 1961
1962   István Dobi[32][33][34]
(1898–1968)
Politician, Prime Minister of Hungary (1948–1952)   Hungary Awarded 30 April 1962
1962   Faiz Ahmad Faiz[32][33][34]
(1911–1984)
Poet   Pakistan Awarded 30 April 1962
1962   Kwame Nkrumah[32][33][34][35]
(1909–1972)
Politician, Prime Minister of Ghana (1957–1960), President of Ghana (1960–1966)   Ghana Awarded 30 April 1962
1962   Pablo Picasso[32][33][34]
(1881–1973)
Painter, sculptor   Spain Awarded 30 April 1962
1962 Olga Poblete[32][34]
(1908–1999)
Teacher, feminist, Professor at the University of Chile, President of the Chilean Movement of Advocates for Peace   Chile Awarded 30 April 1962
1963   Manolis Glezos[36][37]
(born 1922)
Politician, guerilla   Greece Awarded 1 May 1963
1963   Modibo Keïta[35][38][36]
(1915–1977)
Politician, President of Mali (1960–1968)   Mali Awarded 1 May 1963
1963   Oscar Niemeyer[36][37]
(1907–2012)
Architect   Brazil Awarded 1 May 1963
1963   Georgi Traykov[36][39]
(1898–1975)
Politician, Chairman of the National Assembly of Bulgaria (1964–1971)   Bulgaria Awarded 1 May 1963
1964   Rafael Alberti[40][verification needed]
(1902–1999)
Poet   Spain Awarded 1 May 1964
1964 Aruna Asaf Ali[40][41]
(1909–1996)
Politician, independence activist, Vice President of the Women's International Democratic Federation   India Presented 14 August 1965
1964   Ahmed Ben Bella[42]
(1916–2012)
Politician, revolutionary, President of Algeria (1963–1965)   Algeria Awarded 1 May 1964
1964 Herluf Bidstrup[42]
(1912–1988)
Cartoonist, illustrator   Denmark Awarded 1 May 1964
1964   Dolores Ibárruri[13][42]
(1895–1989)
Politician, [[General Secretary of the Communist Party of Spain (1942–1960)   Spain Awarded 1 May 1964
1964   Ota Kaoru [ja][40][verification needed]
(1912–1988)
Trade unionist, Chairman of the General Council of Trade Unions of Japan (1955–1966)   Japan Awarded 1 May 1964
1965 Peter Ayodele Curtis Joseph[35][43]
(1920–2006)
Politician   Nigeria
1965   Jamsrangiin Sambuu[40][verification needed]
(1895–1972)
Politician, Chairman of the Presidium of the People's Great Khural (1954–1972)   Mongolia
1965 Mirjam Vire-Tuominen [fi][43]
(1919–2011)
Politician, General Secretary of the Finnish Peace Committee (1949–1975), General Secretary of the Women's International Democratic Federation (1978–1987), Member of the Parliament of Finland (1970–1979)   Finland
1966   David Alfaro Siqueiros[44][45]
(1896–1974)
Painter   Mexico Awarded 1 May 1967
1966   Miguel Ángel Asturias[6][43][46]
(1899–1974)
Writer, diplomat, Nobel laureate in Literature (1967)   Guatemala
1966 Bram Fischer[44][45]
(1908–1975)
Advocate, anti-apartheid activist   South Africa Awarded 1 May 1967
1966   Rockwell Kent[44][45]
(1882–1971)
Painter, printmaker, adventurer   United States Awarded 1 May 1967
1966 Ivan Málek [cs][44][45]
(1909–1994)
Microbiologist, Professor at Charles University, Member of the National Assembly of Czechoslovakia (1960–1968)   Czechoslovakia Awarded 1 May 1967
1966   Giacomo Manzù[43][47]
(1908–1991)
Sculptor   Italy
1966   Martin Niemöller[44][45]
(1892–1984)
Lutheran pastor, theologian, President of the World Council of Churches (1961–1968)   West Germany Awarded 1 May 1967
1966   Herbert Warnke [de][44][45]
(1902–1975)
Trade unionist, Chairman of the Free German Trade Union Federation (1946–1975)   East Germany Awarded 1 May 1967
1967   Romesh Chandra[48]
(1919–2016)
Politician, President of the World Peace Council (1977–1990)   India
1967 Jean Effel[48]
(1908–1982)
Illustrator, journalist   France
1967   Joris Ivens[48]
(1898–1989)
Documentary filmmaker   Netherlands
1967 Nguyễn Thị Định[48]
(1920–1992)
General, politician, Vice President of Vietnam (1987–1992)   South Vietnam
1967 Endre Sík[48]
(1891–1978)
Politician, historian, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Hungary (1958–1961)   Hungary
1967 Jorge Zalamea Borda[48]
(1905–1969)
Writer, politician   Colombia
1968–1969 Akira Iwai [ja][12]
(1922–1997)
Trade unionist, General Secretary of the General Council of Trade Unions of Japan   Japan Awarded 16 April 1970
1968–1969   Jarosław Iwaszkiewicz[12]
(1894–1980)
Writer   Poland Awarded 16 April 1970
1968–1969   Khaled Mohieddin[12]
(1922–2018)
Major, politician, Chairman of the Egyptian Peace Council   Egypt Awarded 16 April 1970
1968–1969   Linus Pauling[12]
(1901–1994)
Chemist, educator, Nobel laureate in Chemistry (1954), Nobel Peace Prize laureate (1962)   United States Awarded 16 April 1970
1968–1969 Shafie Ahmed el Sheikh[12]
(1924–1971)
Trade unionist, politician   Sudan Awarded 16 April 1970
1968–1969 Bertil Svahnström [sv][12]
(1907–1972)
Journalist, writer   Sweden Awarded 16 April 1970
1970–1971   Hikmat Abu Zayd[49]
(1922/1923–2011)
Politician, academic, Minister of Social Affairs of the United Arab Republic (1962–1965)   Egypt
1970–1971   Eric Burhop[50][51]
(1911–1980)
Physicist, Professor at University College London, Fellow of the Royal Society (1963)   Australia
  United Kingdom
1970–1971   Ernst Busch[50]
(1900–1980)
Singer, actor   East Germany
1970–1971   Tsola Dragoycheva[50]
(1898–1993)
Politician, Member of the National Assembly of Bulgaria (1946–1990)   Bulgaria
1970–1971   Renato Guttuso[50][52]
(1912–1987)
Painter   Italy
1970–1971   Kamal Jumblatt[50][53]
(1917–1977)
Politician, Member of the Parliament of Lebanon (1947–1977)   Lebanon
1970–1971   Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti[54][55]
(1900–1978)
Teacher, women's rights activist   Nigeria
1970–1971   Alfredo Varela [es][6][50]
(1914–1984)
Writer   Argentina
1972   James Aldridge[56][57]
(1918–2015)
Writer   Australia
  United Kingdom
Awarded 1 May 1973
1972   Salvador Allende[56][57]
(1908–1973)
Politician, psysician, President of Chile (1970–1973)   Chile Awarded 1 May 1973
1972   Leonid Brezhnev[56][57]
(1906–1982)
Politician, General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (1964–1982)   Soviet Union Awarded 1 May 1973
1972 Enrique Pastorino[56][57]
(1918–1995)
Trade unionist, politician, President of the World Federation of Trade Unions (1969–1975)   Uruguay Awarded 1 May 1973
1973–1974   Luis Corvalán[58]
(1916–2010)
Politician, General Secretary of the Communist Party of Chile (1958–1990)   Chile
1973–1974 Raymond Goor[58]
(1908–1996)
Priest   Belgium
1973–1974 Jeanne Martin Cissé[58]
(1926–2017)
Politician, teacher   Guinea
1973–1974   Sam Nujoma[35]
(born 1929)
Politician, anti-apartheid activist, President of Namibia (1990–2005)   South Africa (before 1990)
  Namibia (after 1990)
1975–1976   Hortensia Bussi de Allende[59][60]
(1913–2009)
Educator, librarian, First Lady of Chile (1970–1973)   Chile Widow of Salvador Allende (recipient in 1972)
Awarded May 1977
1975–1976   János Kádár[59][60]
(1912–1989)
Politician, General Secretary of the Hungarian Socialist Workers' Party (1956–1988)   Hungary Awarded May 1977
1975–1976   Seán MacBride[59][60]
(1904–1988)
Politician, barrister, International chairman of Amnesty International (1965–1974), Assistant Secretary-General of the United Nations, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (1974)   Ireland
  France
Awarded May 1977
1975–1976   Samora Machel[35][59][60]
(1933–1986)
Politician, revolutionary, President of Mozambique (1975–1986)   Mozambique Awarded May 1977
1975–1976   Agostinho Neto[35][59][60]
(1922–1979)
Politician, revolutionary, President of Angola (1975–1979)   Angola Awarded May 1977
1975–1976 Pierre Pouyade[59][60]
(1911–1979)
Brigadier general, Chairman of the Franco-Soviet Friendship Association   France Awarded May 1977
1975–1976   Yiannis Ritsos[59][60]
(1909–1990)
Poet   Greece Awarded May 1977
1977–1978 Kurt Bachmann [de][61][62]
(1909–1997)
Politician, Chairman of the German Communist Party (1969–1973)   West Germany Awarded 1 May 1979
1977–1978   Freda Brown[59][60]
(1919–2009)
Politician, President of the Women's International Democratic Federation (1975–1989)   Australia Awarded 1 May 1979
1977–1978   Vilma Espín[59][60]
(1930–2007)
Revolutionary, politician, President of the Federation of Cuban Women (1960–2007)   Cuba Awarded 1 May 1979
1977–1978 K. P. S. Menon[59][60]
(1898–1982)
Diplomat, Foreign Secretary of India (1948–1952)   India Awarded 1 May 1979
1977–1978   Halina Skibniewska[59][60]
(1921–2011)
Architect, politician, Deputy Marshal of the Sejm (1971–1985)   Poland Awarded 1 May 1979
1979   Hervé Bazin[63][64]
(1911–1996)
Writer   France Awarded 30 April 1980
1979   Angela Davis[61][62]
(born 1944)
Activist, academic, Professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz   United States Awarded 30 April 1980
1979   Urho Kekkonen[63][64][65][66]
(1900–1986)
Politician, lawyer, President of Finland (1956–1982)   Finland Awarded 30 April 1980
1979   Abd al-Rahman al-Khamisi [ar][63][64]
(1920–1987)
Poet, composer   Egypt Awarded 30 April 1980
1979   Lê Duẩn[63][64]
(1907–1986)
Politician, General Secretary of the Communist Party of Vietnam (1960–1986)   Vietnam Awarded 30 April 1980
1979   Miguel Otero Silva[63][64]
(1908–1985)
Writer, journalist   Venezuela Awarded 30 April 1980
1980–1982   Mahmoud Darwish[67][68]
(1941–2008)
Poet   Palestine Awarded May 1983
1980–1982 John Hanly Morgan[67][68]
(1918–2018)
Unitarian minister   United States
  Canada
Awarded May 1983
1980–1982   Líber Seregni[67][68]
(1916–2004)
Politician, military officer   Uruguay Awarded May 1983
1980–1982   Mikis Theodorakis[67][68]
(born 1925)
Composer   Greece Awarded May 1983
1983–1984   Charilaos Florakis[citation needed]
(1914–2005)
Politician, General Secretary of the Communist Party of Greece (1972–1989)   Greece Awarded 1 May 1985
1983–1984   Indira Gandhi[69][70][71]
(1917–1984)
Politician, Prime Minister of India (1980–1984)   India Awarded posthumously on 1 May 1985
1983–1984 Jean-Marie Legay[69][70][71]
(1925–2012)
Academic   France Awarded 1 May 1985
1983–1984   Nguyễn Hữu Thọ[69][70][71]
(1910–1996)
Politician, Chairman of the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam (1969–1976), Acting President of Vietnam (1980–1981)   Vietnam Awarded 1 May 1985
1983–1984 Eva Palmær [se][69][70][71]
(1904–1995)
Writer, chemist, Chairwoman of the Sweden-Soviet Union Association (1979–1987)   Sweden Awarded 1 May 1985
1983–1984 Luis Vidales[69][70][71]
(1904–1990)
Poet   Colombia Awarded 1 May 1985
1983–1984 Josef Weber [de][69][70][71]
(1908–1985)
Politician, peace activist   West Germany Awarded 1 May 1985
1985–1986   Miguel d'Escoto Brockmann[72][73]
(1933–2017)
Politician, Foreign Minister of Nicaragua (1979–1990), President of the United Nations General Assembly (2008–2009)   Nicaragua
1985–1986   Dorothy Hodgkin[72]
(1910–1994)
Chemist, Fellow of the Royal Society (1947), Nobel laureate in Chemistry (1964)   United Kingdom
1985–1986   Herbert Mies[72]
(1929–2017)
Politician, Chairman of the German Communist Party (1973–1989)   West Germany
1985–1986   Julius Nyerere[72][74]
(1922–1999)
Politician, anti-colonial activist, President of Tanzania (1964–1985)   Tanzania
1985–1986 Petur Tanchev[72]
(1920–1992)
Politician, Member of the National Assembly of Bulgaria (1950–1990)   Bulgaria
1988   Abdul Sattar Edhi[75]
(1928–2016)
Philanthropist, ascetic   Pakistan
1989   Álvaro Cunhal[citation needed]
(1913–2005)
Politician, Secretary-General of the Portuguese Communist Party (1961–1992)   Portugal
1990   Nelson Mandela[35][76][77]
(1918–2013)
Politician, anti-apartheid activist, President of South Africa (1994–1999), Nobel Peace Prize laureate (1993)   South Africa Unable to accept the prize until 2002 due to his trial and imprisonment in South Africa
Unknown year   Martti Ahtisaari[78]
(born 1937)
Politician, diplomat, President of Finland (1994–2000), Nobel Peace Prize laureate (2008)   Finland
Unknown year Valerie Goulding[78]
(1918–2003)
Campaigner   Ireland

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "ПОСТАНОВЛЕНИЕ ПРЕЗИДИУМА ВС СССР ОТ 11.12.1989 N 905-1 О МЕЖДУНАРОДНОЙ ЛЕНИНСКОЙ ПРЕМИИ МИРА" (in Russian). 2006-10-12.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g О присуждении международных Сталинских премий "За укрепление мира между народами" за 1950 год. Pravda. Apr 6, 1951 [1]
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  4. ^ a b c d e f The Miami News – Dec 21, 1951
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian) (2nd ed.). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1953. vol. 24, p. 366.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g El Tiempo – Jun 10, 1980
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1959.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g Eugene Register-Guard – Dec 22, 1952
  9. ^ Sontag, Susan (20 February 2005). "A Report on the Journey". The New York Times. Retrieved 8 October 2018.
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  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i St. Petersburg Times – Dec 21, 1954
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian) (3rd ed.). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. In some cases in GSE's 3rd edition the year is that, "in which" the Prize was awarded, in other cases – "for which". Hence, the year "1970" there seems to be the Prize "for 1969" or "for 1968–1969"
  13. ^ a b Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1989.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1958.
  15. ^ a b c d e f О присуждении международных Сталинских премий "За укрепление мира между народами" за 1955 год. Pravda. Dec 21, 1955, page 1 [2]
  16. ^ a b c d e f Toledo Blade – Dec 21, 1955
  17. ^ "Lenin Peace Prize". NNDB. Retrieved 8 October 2018.
  18. ^ The Telegraph – Apr 8, 1965
  19. ^ Toledo Blade – Dec 29, 1969
  20. ^ Eugene Register-Guard – Oct 8, 1983
  21. ^ Reading Eagle – Apr 11, 1965
  22. ^ Vochenblatt – Nov 27, 1958
  23. ^ a b c d e Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1960.
  24. ^ a b c d e The Deseret News – May 1, 1959
  25. ^ a b c Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1961.
  26. ^ a b c d The Spokesman-Review – May 4, 1960
  27. ^ Yitzhak Oron, ed. (1960). Middle East Record Volume 1.
  28. ^ Sharif, Issam. "Abstract: Aziz Sharif (1904-1990)" (PDF). www.issamsharif.com. Retrieved 9 October 2018.
  29. ^ a b c d e f g Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1962.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g Schenectady Gazette – May 1, 1961
  31. ^ "Tabet, Antoine Georges". The Free Dictionary. The Great Soviet Encyclopedia. Retrieved 9 October 2018.
  32. ^ a b c d e Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1963.
  33. ^ a b c d The Milwaukee Journal – Apr 30, 1962
  34. ^ a b c d e Daytona Beach Morning Journal – May 1, 1962
  35. ^ a b c d e f g Meddlesome Medals?
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  37. ^ a b Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1964.
  38. ^ "Modibo Keita." Encyclopedia of World Biography, 2nd ed. 17 Vols. Gale Research, 1998.
  39. ^ Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1965.
  40. ^ a b c d Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1966.
  41. ^ The Sumter Daily Item – Aug 14, 1965
  42. ^ a b c Toledo Blade – Apr 30, 1964
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  44. ^ a b c d e f Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1968. p. 622.
  45. ^ a b c d e f The Miami News – May 1, 1967
  46. ^ The Milwaukee Journal – Jun 10, 1974
  47. ^ Lodi News-Sentinel – Jan 19, 1991
  48. ^ a b c d e f Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1969. p. 607.
  49. ^ Shukri, Sabin M. (1984). The International Who's Who of the Arab World (2nd ed.). London: International Who's Who of the Arab World. p. 31. ISBN 978-0-9506122-1-8.
  50. ^ a b c d e f Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1972. p. 618.
  51. ^ Toledo Blade – Jan 23, 1980
  52. ^ The Palm Beach Post – Jan 19, 1987
  53. ^ Lewiston Evening Journal – Mar 16, 1977
  54. ^ Ian Sansom (11 December 2010). "Great Dynasties: The Ransome-Kutis". The Guardian. Retrieved June 18, 2014.
  55. ^ Johnson-Odim, Cheryl (January–February 2009). "'For their freedoms': The anti-imperialist and international feminist activity of Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti of Nigeria". Women's Studies International Forum, special issue: Circling the Globe: International Feminism Reconsidered, 1910 to 1975. ScienceDirect. 32 (1): 58. doi:10.1016/j.wsif.2009.01.004. Pdf.[permanent dead link]
  56. ^ a b c d Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1973. p. 634.
  57. ^ a b c d The Milwaukee Journal – May 1, 1973
  58. ^ a b c Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1975. p. 653.
  59. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1977. p. 633.
  60. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Lakeland Ledger – May 2, 1977
  61. ^ a b Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1979. p. 573.
  62. ^ a b The Spokesman-Review – May 1, 1979
  63. ^ a b c d e Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1980. p. 577.
  64. ^ a b c d e Toledo Blade – Apr 30, 1980
  65. ^ The Evening Independent, October 27, 1981
  66. ^ Star-News – Nov 14, 1980
  67. ^ a b c d Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1983.
  68. ^ a b c d Reading Eagle – May 4, 1983
  69. ^ a b c d e f Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1985. p. 571.
  70. ^ a b c d e f El Tiempo – May 1, 1985
  71. ^ a b c d e f LENIN PEACE PRIZE AWARDED TO INDIRA GANDHI
  72. ^ a b c d e Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1987. p. 599.
  73. ^ Herald-Journal – Jan 15, 1988
  74. ^ The Telegraph – Sep 9, 1987
  75. ^ Daily Times, January 30th 2008
  76. ^ The Great Encyclopedic Dictionary (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1991. vol. 1, p. 759.
  77. ^ MANDELA FINALLY PICKS UP PRIZE
  78. ^ a b "Lenin Peace Prize Recipients". Research History. Retrieved 4 May 2017.

External linksEdit