Legislative districts of Nueva Ecija

The legislative districts of Nueva Ecija are the representations of the province of Nueva Ecija in the various national legislatures of the Philippines. The province is currently represented in the lower house of the Congress of the Philippines through its first, second, third, and fourth congressional districts.

HistoryEdit

Philippine Commission Act No. 1582 initially constituted Nueva Ecija into a single assembly district for the first elections to the lower chamber of the bicameral Philippine Legislature in 1907.[1] The province was later divided into two districts with the enactment of Act No. 3336 on December 7, 1926;[2] their separate representatives were first elected in the 1928 elections.

When seats for the upper house of the Philippine Legislature were elected from territory-based districts between 1916 and 1935, the province formed part of the third senatorial district which elected two out of the 24-member senate.

During the Japanese occupation of the Philippines in the Second World War, two delegates represented Nueva Ecija in the unicameral National Assembly of the Second Philippine Republic: one was the provincial governor (an ex officio member), while the other was indirectly elected through local conventions of KALIBAPI party members.[3]

The pre-war two-representative district configuration was restored upon the re-establishment of the Philippine Commonwealth in 1945, and lasted until the disbandment of Congress in 1972 as a result of the declaration of Martial Law. Two chartered cities created during this period — Cabanatuan (1950) and Palayan (1965) — remained part of the second congressional district of Nueva Ecija, by virtue of Republic Act No. 526 (§90)[4] and Republic Act No. 4475 (§42), respectively.[5]

Nueva Ecija was represented in the Interim Batasang Pambansa as part of Region III from 1978 to 1984, and elected four representatives, at large, to the Regular Batasang Pambansa in 1984.

The province was reapportioned into four congressional districts[6] under the new Constitution which was proclaimed on February 11, 1987, and elected members to the restored House of Representatives starting that same year.

1st DistrictEdit

Period Representative[8]
8th Congress
1987–1992
Eduardo Nonato N. Joson
9th Congress
1992–1995
Renato V. Diaz
10th Congress
1995–1998
11th Congress
1998–2001
Josefina M. Joson
12th Congress
2001–2004
13th Congress
2004–2007
14th Congress
2007–2010
Eduardo Nonato N. Joson
15th Congress
2010–2013
Josefina M. Joson
16th Congress
2013–2016
Estrellita B. Suansing
17th Congress
2016–2019
18th Congress
2019–2022

1928–1972Edit

Period Representative[8]
8th Philippine Legislature
1928–1931
Hermogenes Concepcion
9th Philippine Legislature
1931–1934
Manuel V. Gallego
10th Philippine Legislature
1934–1935
Jose R. Robles
1st National Assembly
1935–1938
Manuel A. Alzate
2nd National Assembly
1938–1941
1st Commonwealth Congress
1945
Manuel V. Gallego
1st Congress
1946–1949
vacant
Jose A. Cando[a]
2nd Congress
1949–1953
Jose O. Corpus
3rd Congress
1953–1957
4th Congress
1957–1961
Eugenio Baltao[b]
5th Congress
1961–1965
6th Congress
1965–1969
7th Congress
1969–1972
Leopoldo D. Diaz[c]

Notes

  1. ^ Winner of the 1946 election, but his election was contested due to his membership in the rebel group Hukbalahap. His oath of office was deferred, but ultimately administered on January 29, 1948.[8]
  2. ^ Proclaimed winner of a third term on April 23, 1966 following a protracted legal battle with defeated rival Leopoldo Diaz.[9] Oath taken on April 25, 1966.[8]
  3. ^ Oath taken on January 27, 1969.[8]

2nd DistrictEdit

Period Representative[8]
8th Congress
1987–1992
Simeon E. Garcia, Jr.
9th Congress
1992–1995
Eleuterio R. Violago
10th Congress
1995–1998
11th Congress
1998–2001
Simeon E. Garcia, Jr.
12th Congress
2001–2004
Eleuterio R. Violago
13th Congress
2004–2007
14th Congress
2007–2010
Joseph Gilbert F. Violago
15th Congress
2010–2013
16th Congress
2013–2016
17th Congress
2016–2019
Micaela S. Violago
18th Congress
2019–2022

1928–1972Edit

Period Representative[8]
8th Philippine Legislature
1928–1931
Aurelio V. Cecilio
9th Philippine Legislature
1931–1934
Felipe Buencamino, Jr.
10th Philippine Legislature
1934–1935
Isauro Gabaldon
1st National Assembly
1935–1938
Felipe Buencamino, Jr.[a]
2nd National Assembly
1938–1941
vacant
1st Commonwealth Congress
1945
Gabriel Belmonte
1st Congress
1946–1949
vacant
Constancio Padilla[b]
2nd Congress
1949–1953
Jesus Ilagan
3rd Congress
1953–1957
Celestino C. Juan
4th Congress
1957–1961
Felicisimo Ocampo
5th Congress
1961–1965
6th Congress
1965–1969
Angel D. Concepcion
7th Congress
1969–1972

Notes

  1. ^ Resigned on March 27, 1940.[8][10] Seat remained vacant for the remainder of the 2nd National Assembly.
  2. ^ Winner of the 1946 election, but his election was contested due to his membership in the rebel group Hukbalahap. His oath of office was deferred, but ultimately administered on May 3, 1948.[8]

3rd DistrictEdit

Period Representative[8]
8th Congress
1987–1992
Hermogenes D. Concepcion, Jr.
9th Congress
1992–1995
Pacifico M. Fajardo
10th Congress
1995–1998
11th Congress
1998–2001
12th Congress
2001–2004
Aurelio M. Umali
13th Congress
2004–2007
14th Congress
2007–2010
Czarina D. Umali
15th Congress
2010–2013
16th Congress
2013–2016
17th Congress
2016–2019
Rosanna V. Vergara
18th Congress
2019–2022

4th DistrictEdit

Period Representative[8]
8th Congress
1987–1992
Nicanor G. De Guzman, Jr.[a]
vacant
9th Congress
1992–1995
Victorio A. Lorenzo
10th Congress
1995–1998
Julita Lorenzo-Villareal
11th Congress
1998–2001
12th Congress
2001–2004
Raul L. Villareal
13th Congress
2004–2007
Rodolfo W. Antonino
14th Congress
2007–2010
15th Congress
2010–2013
16th Congress
2013–2016
Magnolia Rosa C. Antonino-Nadres
17th Congress
2016–2019
18th Congress
2019–2022
Maricel G. Natividad-Nagaño
  1. ^ Resigned on August 7, 1990,[8] after being convicted of illegal possession of firearms on June 19, 1990.[11] Seat remained vacant for the remainder of the 8th Congress.

Lone District (defunct)Edit

Period Representative
1st Philippine Legislature
1907–1909
Isauro Gabaldon
2nd Philippine Legislature
1909–1912
3rd Philippine Legislature
1912–1916
Lucio Gonzales
4th Philippine Legislature
1916–1919
Isidoro Gonzales
5th Philippine Legislature
1919–1922
Gaudencio Medina
6th Philippine Legislature
1922–1925
Hermogenes Concepcion
7th Philippine Legislature
1925–1928
vacant[a]
Feliciano Ramoso[b]

Notes

  1. ^ Isauro Gabaldon, the winner of the June 1925 election, was disqualified[8] for lack of residency, as he had been serving in Washington, D.C. as the Resident Commissioner of the Philippines in the United States Congress since 1920. However, Gabaldon was re-elected as Resident Commissioner in late 1925 and served in the 69th United States Congress starting March 4, 1926.[12]
  2. ^ Won in a special election held on March 22, 1926 to replace Isauro Gabaldon.[8]

At-Large (defunct)Edit

1943–1944Edit

Period Representatives[13]
National Assembly
1943–1944
Hermogenes Concepcion
Jose Robles, Jr. (ex officio)

2021 to presentEdit

Period Representatives[8]
Regular Batasang Pambansa
1984&nd

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ United States Department of War. "Act No. 1582 — An Act to provide for the holding of elections in the Philippine Islands, for the organization of the Philippine Assembly, and for other purposes". Acts of the Philippine Commission, No. 1-1800 - Volume X. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.
  2. ^ Philippine Legislature. "Act No. 3336 — An Act to amend sections one hundred and sixteen and one hundred and twenty-three of Act Nummbere Twenty-seven hundred and eleven, known as the Administrative Code.". Public Laws Enacted by the Philippine Legislature, during the Period July 30, 1926 to February 10, 1927, comprising Acts Nos. 3269 to 3346 - Volume 22. Manila: Bureau of Printing. pp. 102–103.
  3. ^ Ramirez, Efren V. (1969). Philippine Government (For College Students). E. Q. Cornejo. p. 94.
  4. ^ Congress of the Philippines (June 16, 1950). "Republic Act No. 526 — An Act Creating the City of Cabanatuan". The Corpus Juris. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  5. ^ Congress of the Philippines (June 19, 1965). "Republic Act No. 4475 — An Act Establishing the New Capital of the Province of Nueva Ecija, Creating the City of Palayan, Providing a Charter Therefor, and for Other Purposes". The Corpus Juris. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  6. ^ "1987 Constitution of the Philippines — Apportionment Ordinance". Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines. 1987. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d "Table 1: Population of Legislative Districts by Region, Province, and Selected Highly Urbanized/Component City, 2015". Philippine Statistics Authority. 2016. Retrieved July 11, 2019.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Congressional Library Bureau. "Roster of Philippine Legislators". Republic of the Philippines - House of Representatives. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  9. ^ Urera, Vivencio (1966). Philippine Government Elected Officials: Semi-Pictorial Directory.
  10. ^ "News Summary, Philippine Magazine: March 16 – April 15, 1940". Official Gazette of the Republic of the Philippines. May 1, 1940. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  11. ^ The Fookien Times Philippines Yearbook. 1990. ISBN 9789710503506.
  12. ^ "Biography: GABALDON, Isauro". United States House of Representatives - History Art & Archives. 2011. Retrieved March 21, 2020.
  13. ^ Official program of the inauguration of the Republic of the Philippines and the induction into office of His Excellency Jose P. Laurel. Bureau of Printing. 1943.