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The Legislative districts of Bulacan are the representations of the province of Bulacan in the various national legislatures of the Philippines. The province is currently represented in the lower house of the Congress of the Philippines through its first, second, third and fourth districts. The component city of San Jose del Monte, while remaining an integral part of the province, was granted separate congressional representation in 2003.

Valenzuela (formerly Polo), now a highly urbanized city, was last represented as part of the province in 1972.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Bulacan was initially divided into two representative districts in 1907. When seats for the upper house of the Philippine Legislature were elected from territory-based districts between 1916 and 1935, the province formed part of the third senatorial district which elected two out of the 24-member senate.

In the disruption caused by the Second World War, two delegates represented the province in the National Assembly of the Japanese-sponsored Second Philippine Republic: one was the provincial governor (an ex officio member), while the other was elected through a provincial assembly of KALIBAPI members during the Japanese occupation of the Philippines. Upon the restoration of the Philippine Commonwealth in 1945, the province retained its two pre-war representative districts.

Valenzuela, then a municipality, was separated from Bulacan to form the Metropolitan Manila Area on 7 November 1975 by virtue of Presidential Decree No. 824.[1] Afterwards, the reduced province of Bulacan was represented in the Interim Batasang Pambansa as part of Region III from 1978 to 1984, and returned four representatives, elected at large, to the Regular Batasang Pambansa in 1984.

The province was reapportioned into four congressional districts under the new Constitution[2] which was proclaimed on 11 February 1987, and elected members to the restored House of Representatives starting that same year.

The passage of Republic Act No. 9230.[3] on 18 December 2003 separated from the fourth district the city of San Jose del Monte, which first elected its separate representative beginning in the 2004 elections. However, for the purposes of electing Sangguniang Panlalawigan members, the city remains part of the province's 4th Sangguniang Panlalawigan District.[4]

Republic Act No. 9591,[5] approved on May 1, 2009, sought to separate the city of Malolos from the first district to form its own congressional district starting in the 2010 elections. Like in the case of San Jose del Monte, the residents of Malolos would have remained as part of the province's 1st Sangguniang Panlalawigan district. However, on 25 January 2010, the Supreme Court declared the creation of the Legislative District of Malolos City as unconstitutional, citing that the city's population at the time did not meet the minimum 250,000 count required by the constitution.[6] Malolos today remains part of the first district.

1st DistrictEdit

 
1st District of Bulacan
Period Representative[7]
8th Congress
1987–1992
Francisco B. Aniag, Jr.
9th Congress
1992–1995
Teodulo C. Natividad
10th Congress
1995–1998
11th Congress
1998–2001
Wilhelmino M. Sy-Alvarado
12th Congress
2001–2004
13th Congress
2004–2007
14th Congress
2007–2010
Ma. Victoria R. Sy-Alvarado
15th Congress
2010–2013
16th Congress
2013–2016
17th Congress
2016–2019
Jose Antonio R. Sy-Alvarado
18th Congress
2019–2022

1907–1972Edit

Period Representative[7]
1st Philippine Legislature
1907–1909
Aguedo Velarde
2nd Philippine Legislature
1909–1912
Hermogenes Reyes
3rd Philippine Legislature
1912–1916
Aguedo Velarde[a]
Ambrosio Santos[b]
4th Philippine Legislature
1916–1919
Mariano Escueta
5th Philippine Legislature
1919–1922
Jose Padilla
6th Philippine Legislature
1922–1925
7th Philippine Legislature
1925–1928
8th Philippine Legislature
1928–1931
Angel Suntay
9th Philippine Legislature
1931–1934
Francisco Afan Delgado
10th Philippine Legislature
1934–1935
1st National Assembly
1935–1938
Nicolas Buendia
2nd National Assembly
1938–1941
1st Commonwealth Congress
1941–1946
Leon Valencia[c]
1st Congress[d]
1946–1949
Florante C. Roque[e]
2nd Congress
1949–1953
Erasmo R. Cruz[f]
3rd Congress
1953–1957
4th Congress
1957–1961
Jose Suntay
5th Congress
1961–1965
Teodulo C. Natividad
6th Congress
1965–1969
7th Congress
1969–1972

Notes

  1. ^ Died in 1914.[7]
  2. ^ Won in special election held on 15 May 1914 to replace vacant seat.[7]
  3. ^ Elected as representative in the November 1941 election, but died before the beginning of the first session on 9 June 1945.[7]
  4. ^ Jesus B. Lava was elected in the 1946 elections, but his election was contested due to his membership in the rebel group Hukbalahap. His oath of office was deferred and was never sat as representative.[7]
  5. ^ For 1st Congress: Initially conceded to Jesus B. Lava, but later filed an electoral protest which allowed Roque to sit as representative.[8] For 2nd Congress: unseated by Erasmo R. Cruz on 4 May 1953.[7]
  6. ^ Unseated Florante C. Roque on 4 May 1953; served for the remainder of the 2nd Congress.[7]

2nd DistrictEdit

 
2nd District of Bulacan
Period Representative[7]
8th Congress
1987–1992
Vicente C. Rivera, Jr.
9th Congress
1992–1995
Pedro M. Pancho
10th Congress
1995–1998
11th Congress
1998–2001
12th Congress
2001–2004
Wilfrido B. Villarama
13th Congress
2004–2007
Pedro M. Pancho
14th Congress
2007–2010
15th Congress
2010–2013
16th Congress
2013–2016
Gavini "Apol" C. Pancho
17th Congress
2016–2019
18th Congress
2019–2022

1907–1972Edit

Period Representative[7]
1st Philippine Legislature
1907–1909
Leon Ma. Guerrero
2nd Philippine Legislature
1909–1912
Mariano Ponce
3rd Philippine Legislature
1912–1916
Ceferino De Leon
4th Philippine Legislature
1916–1919
Ricardo Gonzales Lloret
5th Philippine Legislature
1919–1922
Cirilo B. Santos
6th Philippine Legislature
1922–1925
Norberto C. Manikis
7th Philippine Legislature
1925–1928
Jose Serapio
8th Philippine Legislature
1928–1931
Cirilo B. Santos
9th Philippine Legislature
1931–1934
Jose De Leon, Jr.
10th Philippine Legislature
1934–1935
Pablo Payawal
1st National Assembly
1935–1938
Antonio Villarama
2nd National Assembly
1938–1941
1st Commonwealth Congress
1941–1946
1st Congress
1946–1949
Alejo S. Santos[a]
2nd Congress
1949–1953
3rd Congress
1953–1957
Rogaciano M. Mercado
4th Congress
1957–1961
5th Congress
1961–1965
6th Congress
1965–1969
7th Congress
1969–1972

Notes

  1. ^ Seated as representative after taking oath of office on 30 September 1946.[7][9]

3rd DistrictEdit

 
3rd District of Bulacan
Period Representative[7]
8th Congress
1987–1992
Jose L. Cabochan
9th Congress
1992–1995
Ricardo C. Silverio
10th Congress
1995–1998
11th Congress
1998–2001
12th Congress
2001–2004
Lorna C. Silverio
13th Congress
2004–2007
14th Congress
2007–2010
15th Congress
2010–2013
Joselito Andrew R. Mendoza
16th Congress
2013–2016
17th Congress
2016–2019
Lorna C. Silverio
18th Congress
2019–2022

4th DistrictEdit

 
4th District of Bulacan
Period Representative[7]
13th Congress
2004–2007
Reylina G. Nicolas
14th Congress
2007–2010
15th Congress
2010–2013
Linabelle Ruth R. Villarica
16th Congress
2013–2016
17th Congress
2016–2019
18th Congress
2019–2022
Henry R. Villarica

1987–2004Edit

Period Representative[7]
8th Congress
1987–1992
Rogaciano M. Mercado[b]
vacant
9th Congress
1992–1995
Angelito M. Sarmiento[c]
10th Congress
1995–1998
11th Congress
1998–2001
vacant
12th Congress
2001–2004
Reylina G. Nicolas

Notes

  1. ^ Granted separate representation starting 2004, but still votes as part of the 4th district when electing Sangguniang Panlalawigan members.
  2. ^ Died on 13 November 1989 before the end of term; seat remained vacant until the end of the 8th Congress.[7]
  3. ^ Appointed Presidential Adviser on Agricultural Modernization in 2001; seat remained vacant until the end of the 11th Congress.[7]

At-Large (defunct)Edit

1898–1899Edit

Period Representatives
Malolos Congress
1898–1899
Ambrosio Rianzares Bautista
Mariano Crisostomo
Pedro Serrano
Trinidad Icasiano

1943–1944Edit

Period Representatives[7]
National Assembly
1943–1944
Jacinto Molina[10]
Emilio Rustia (ex officio)[10]

1984–1986Edit

Period Representatives[7]
Regular Batasang Pambansa
1984–1986
Jesus J. Hipolito
Rogaciano M. Mercado
Teodulo C. Natividad
Blas F. Ople

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Marcos, Ferdinand E. (7 November 1975). "Presidential Decree No. 824 - Creating the Metropolitan Manila and the Metropolitan Manila Commission and for Other Purposes". The LawPHiL Project. Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  2. ^ 1986 Constitutional Commission (2 February 1987). "1987 Constitution of the Philippines - Apportionment Ordinance". Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  3. ^ "Republic Act No. 9230 - An Act amending section 10(b) and section 58 of Republic Act No. 8797, otherwise known as "An Act converting the municipality of San Jose Del Monte, Bulacan into a component city to be known as the city of San Jose Del Monte" and providing funds therefor" (PDF). Congress of the Philippines. 18 December 2003. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 June 2011. Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  4. ^ Commission on Elections (11 January 2007). "COMELEC Resolution No. 7801 – Annex B" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 May 2008. Retrieved 26 August 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  5. ^ Congress of the Philippines (1 May 2009). "Republic Act No. 9591 - An Act amending Section 57 of Republic Act No. 8754, otherwise known as the Charter of the City of Malolos" (PDF). Senate of the Philippines. Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  6. ^ Supreme Court of the Philippines (25 January 2010). "G.R. No. 188078 : January 25, 2010 - VICTORINO B. ALDABA, CARLO JOLETTE S. FAJARDO, JULIO G. MORADA, and MINERVA ALDABA MORADA, Petitioners, v. COMMISSION ON ELECTIONS, Respondent". Chan Robles Law Library. Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Congressional Library Bureau. "Roster of Philippine Legislators". Republic of the Philippines, House of Representatives. Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  8. ^ Dalisay, Jr., Jose Y (1998). "The Lava Brothers: Blood and Politics" (PDF). Public Policy. II (3): 87–112.
  9. ^ Supreme Court of the Philippines (5 March 1947). "[G.R. No. L-1123. March 5, 1947.] ALEJO MABANAG, ET AL., Petitioners, v. JOSE LOPEZ VITO, ET AL., Respondents. Alejo Mabanag, Jose O. Vera, Jesus G. Barrera, Felix-berto Serrano, J. Antonio Araneta, Antonio Barredo, and Jose W. Diokno, for Petitioners. Secretary of Justice Ozaeta, Solicitor General Tañada, and First Assistant Solicitor General Reyes for Respondents". Chan Robles Law Library. Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  10. ^ a b Official program of the inauguration of the Republic of the Philippines and the induction into office of His Excellency Jose P. Laurel. Bureau of Printing. 1943.