Legal status of human sterilization by country

This article provides an overview of human sterilization by country. While many countries permit voluntary sterilization for contraceptive purposes, some permit it only for medical or eugenic purposes. Additional restrictions may include minimum age, parental or spousal consent.[1]

Country Allowed for contraceptive purposes Notes
Andorra Yes[1] Since 1996
Australia Yes[1] Since 1977
Austria Yes[1] 25+ years for contraceptive purposes. Since 1974
Bangladesh Yes[1]
Botswana Yes[1]
Brazil Yes[1] 25+ years or <25 with two children for contraceptive purposes. Since 1996
Canada Yes[1] Since 1979
Chile Yes[1] Since 2001
China Yes[1]
Colombia Yes[1] Since 1984
Costa Rica Yes[1] Since 1999
Croatia Yes[1] 35+ for contraceptive purposes. Since 1978
Cuba Yes[1] 32+ years with several children for contraceptive purposes. Since 1968
Czech Republic Yes[1] 35+ years with three children or <35 with four children for contraceptive purposes. Since 1991
Denmark Yes[1] 25+ years for contraceptive reasons. Since 1976
Dominican Republic Yes[1] 40+ years with one child, 35+ with three children, 30+ with five children or 25+ with six children for contraceptive purposes. Since 1972
Ecuador Yes[1] 25+ years with three children for contraceptive purposes. Since 1992
El Salvador Yes[1] Since 1979
Fiji Yes[1]
Finland Yes[1] 30+ years or <30 years and three children for contraceptive purposes. Since 1985
France Yes[1] Since 2001
Germany Yes[1]
Ghana Yes[1]
Guatemala No[1]
Honduras Yes[1] 35+ years with one child or 24–43 with three children for contraceptive purposes.
Hungary Yes[1] 40+ years or 35+ years with three children or 30+ years with four children.
Iceland Yes[1]
India Yes[1]
Indonesia Yes[1]
Israel Yes[1]
Italy Yes[1]
Japan No[1] Current law since 1996.
Kenya Yes[1]
Kyrgyzystan No[1]
Lesotho Yes[1]
Liechtenstein Yes[1] 25+ years for contraceptive purposes.
Lithuania[2] No
Luxembourg Yes[1]
Malaysia No According to 1981 fatwa sterilization is forbidden for men and women. Temporary contraceptive methods may be permitted for health and economic reasons.[3]
Mexico Yes[1]
Mongolia Yes[1]
Myanmar No[1] Since 1963
Nepal Yes[1]
Netherlands Yes[1]
New Zealand Yes[1]
Nicaragua Yes[1]
Niger Yes[1] 35+ years with four children for contraceptive purposes.
Nigeria Yes[1]
Norway Yes[1]
Pakistan Yes[1]
Panama Yes[1] Five children for contraceptive purposes.
Paraguay Yes[1]
Peru Yes[1]
Philippines Yes[1]
Poland No Reproductive sterilisation of men or women has been defined as a criminal act since 1997[4]:19 and remains so as of 5 September 2019, under Article 156 §1, which also covers making someone blind, deaf or mute, of the 1997 law.[5]:64 The original 1997 law punished contraventions with a prison sentence of one to ten years[4] and the updated law as of 5 September 2019 sets a prison sentence of at least 3 years.[5] The prison sentence is a maximum of three years if the sterilisation is involuntary, under Art. 156 §2.[4][5]:64
Portugal Yes[1] 25+ years for contraceptive purposes.
Romania Yes[1]
Russia Yes[1] 35+ years or <35 with two children.
Singapore Yes[1]
Slovenia Yes[1] 35+ years for contraceptive purposes
Rwanda No[1]
Saudi Arabia No[1]
South Africa Yes[1]
South Korea Yes[1] Since 1973
Spain Yes[1]
Sri Lanka Yes[1]
Sudan No[1] Since 1990
Sweden Yes[1] 25+ years for contraceptive purposes; 18–25 for eugenic, health (women only) or sex change reasons.
Switzerland Yes[1]
Taiwan Yes[1] Since 1984
Tanzania Yes[1]
Thailand Yes[1]
Trinidad and Tobago Yes[1]
Tunisia Yes[1] Since 1973
Turkey Yes[1] Since 1983
Uganda Yes[1] Since 1993
United Arab Emirates No Women can opt for sterilisation if they have had "any medical illness that could endanger their life in future due to pregnancy.[6]
United Kingdom Yes[1]
United States Yes[1]
Venezuela No[1] Since 1971
Vietnam Yes[1] Since 1989
Zambia Yes[1] Since 1965
Zimbabwe Yes[1] Since 1985

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb "Contraceptive Sterilization: Global Issues and Trends. Chapter 4" (PDF). 2002.
  2. ^ "2016–2017 Human Rights in Lithuania" (PDF). Lithuania has not legalized voluntary surgical sterilization, as a family planning method line feed character in |quote= at position 67 (help)
  3. ^ "Reproductive rights: Malaysia" (PDF). p. 94.
  4. ^ a b c "553 Ustawa z dnia 6 czerwca 1997 r. – Kodeks karny" [553 Law of 6 June 1997 – Criminal code] (PDF). Sejm. 6 June 1997. Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 September 2019. Retrieved 30 September 2019.
  5. ^ a b c "Ustawa z dnia 6 czerwca 1997 r. – Kodeks karny – Opracowano na podstawie t.j. Dz. U. z 2018 r. poz. 1600, 2077, z 2019 r. poz. 730, 858, 870, 1135, 1579" [Law of 6 June 1997 – Criminal code – Updated on the basis of Dz. U. 2018 parts 1600, 2077, and Dz. U. 2019 parts 730, 858, 870, 1135, 1579] (PDF). Sejm. 5 September 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on 30 September 2019. Retrieved 30 September 2019.
  6. ^ Women now able to undergo sterilisation at private hospitals