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Lee Sedol (Korean: 이세돌; born 2 March 1983), or Lee Se-dol, is a South Korean professional Go player of 9 dan rank.[1] As of February 2016, he ranked second in international titles (18), behind only Lee Chang-ho (21). He is the fifth youngest (12 years 4 months) to become a professional Go player in South Korean history behind Cho Hun-hyun (9 years 7 months), Lee Chang-ho (11 years 1 months), Cho Hye-yeon (11 years 10 months) and Choi Cheol-han (12 years 2 months). His nickname is "The Strong Stone" ("Ssen-dol"). He was defeated by the computer program AlphaGo in a 1-4 series in March 2016.[2]

Lee Sedol
Lee Se-Dol.jpg
Lee Sedol in 2016
Hangul 세돌
Hanja
Revised Romanization I Sedol
McCune–Reischauer Ri Sedol
Born (1983-03-02) 2 March 1983 (age 35)[1]
Sinan County, South Jeolla Province, South Korea
Residence South Korea
Teacher Kweon Kab-yong[1]
Turned pro 1995
Rank 9 dan[1]
Affiliation Hanguk Kiwon[1]
Lee Sedol
Medal record
Representing  South Korea
Asian Games
Gold medal – first place 2010 Guangzhou Men's Team

Contents

BiographyEdit

Lee was born in South Korea in 1983 and studied at the Korea Baduk Association. He ranks second in international titles (18), behind only Lee Chang-ho (21). Despite this, he describes his opening play as "very weak".[3] Lee is married and has one daughter.[4] In February 2013, Lee announced that he planned to retire within three years and move to the U.S. to promote Go.[5] He plays on Tygem as "gjopok".[6] He is known as 'Bigeumdo Boy' because he was born and grew up on Bigeumdo Island.[7]

Lee's Broken Ladder GameEdit

This was a match between Lee Sedol and Hong Chang-sik during the 2003 KAT cup, played on 23 April 2003. This game is notable for Lee's use of a broken ladder formation.

Normally playing out a broken ladder is a bad mistake, a pitfall associated with bad beginner play; the chasing stones are left appallingly weak. Between experts it should be decisive, leading to a lost game. Lee, playing black, defied the conventional wisdom, pushing development of the ladder to capture a large group of Hong's stones in the lower-right side of the board. Although Black could not capture the stones in the ladder, White ultimately resigned.[8]

                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
Moves 67 to 97 (Black: Lee Sedol; White: Hong Chang-sik).
Black wins when White resigns at move 211.

Match against AlphaGoEdit

Starting March 9, 2016, Lee played a five-game match, broadcast live, against the computer program AlphaGo, developed by a London-based artificial intelligence firm Google DeepMind, for a $1 million match prize.[9][10][11] He said “I have heard that Google DeepMind’s AI is surprisingly strong and getting stronger, but I am confident that I can win at least this time”.[12] In an interview with Sohn Suk-hee of JTBC Newsroom on February 22, 2016,[13] he showed confidence in his chances again, while saying that even beating AlphaGo by 4-1 may allow the Google DeepMind team to claim its de facto victory and the defeat of him, or even humanity. In this interview he pointed out the time rule in this match, which seems well-balanced so that both he and the AI would fairly undergo time pressure. In another interview at Yonhap News, Lee Se-dol said that he was confident of beating AlphaGo by a score of 5-0, at least 4-1 and accepted the challenge in only five minutes. He also stated "Of course, there would have been many updates in the last four or five months, but that isn’t enough time to challenge me".[14]

On March 9, Lee played black and lost the first game by resignation.[15] On March 10, he played white and lost the second game by resignation.[16] On March 12, he played black and lost the third game as well.[17] On March 13, he played white and won the fourth game, following an unexpected move at White 78 described as "a brilliant tesuji", and by Gu Li 9 dan as a "divine move" and completely unforeseen by him. GoGameGuru commented that this game was "a masterpiece for Lee Sedol and will almost certainly become a famous game in the history of Go".[18] Lee commented after the victory that he considered AlphaGo was strongest when playing white (second). For this reason, and because he thought winning a second time with black would be more valuable than winning with white, he requested that he play black in the final fifth game, which is considered more risky when following Chinese go rules.[19] On March 15, he played black and lost the fifth game, to lose the Go series 1-4.[20]

                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
Game 4, Lee Sedol (white) v. AlphaGo (black).
First 78 moves

After his fourth-match victory, Lee was overjoyed: "I don't think I've ever felt so good after winning just one match. I remember when I said I will win all or lose just one game in the beginning. If this had really happened ― I won 3 rounds and lost this round ― it would have had a great bearing on my reputation. However, since I won after losing 3 games in a row, I am so happy. I will never exchange this win for anything in the world."[21] He added: "I, Lee Se-dol, lost, but mankind did not."[19] After the last match, however, Lee was saddened: "I failed. I feel sorry that the match is over and it ended like this. I wanted it to end well." He also confessed that "As a professional Go player, I never want to play this kind of match again. I endured the match because I accepted it."[22]

Promotion recordEdit

Lee Sedol turned pro in 1995 as 1 dan, and reached 9 dan in 2003.[23]

Rank Date Notes
1 dan 2 July 1995 Promoted to professional dan rank after passing qualifying test.
2 dan 1 January 1998
3 dan 1 January 2000
6 dan 28 March 2003 Won the 7th LG Cup against Lee Changho (4 dan and 5 dan were skipped over due to the Hanguk Kiwon promotion rules).
7 dan 6 May 2003 Runner up in the KT Cup against Yoo Changhyuk.
9 dan 7 July 2003 Won 16th Fujitsu Cup against Song Taekon (8 dan was skipped over due to the Hanguk Kiwon promotion rules).

Career recordEdit

As of 10 June 2018[24][25]
  • 1997: 0 wins, 1 losses
  • 1998: 0 wins, 1 losses
  • 1999: 0 wins, 0 losses
  • 2000: 30 wins, 12 losses
  • 2001: 31 wins, 17 losses
  • 2002: 48 wins, 25 losses
  • 2003: 33 wins, 18 losses
  • 2004: 40 wins, 18 losses
  • 2005: 44 wins, 21 losses
  • 2006: 78 wins, 28 losses
  • 2007: 81 wins, 23 losses
  • 2008: 74 wins, 26 losses
  • 2009: 26 wins, 15 losses
  • 2010: 74 wins, 14 losses
  • 2011: 54 wins, 21 losses
  • 2012: 61 wins, 25 losses
  • 2013: 54 wins, 39 losses
  • 2014: 59 wins, 25 losses
  • 2015: 53 wins, 27 losses
  • 2016: 48 wins, 27 losses
  • 2017: 26 wins, 17 losses
  • 2018: 21 wins, 14 losses
  • Total: 935 wins, 414 losses (69.3% winning percentage)

Titles and runners-upEdit

As of 10 June 2018

Ranks #3 in total number of titles in Korea and #2 in international titles.

Domestic
Title Wins Runners-up
Baedalwang 1 (2000)
Paedal Cup 1 (2000)
Chunwon 1 (2000) 2 (2006, 2008)
GS Caltex Cup 3 (2002, 2006, 2012) 3 (2007, 2013, 2018)
Wangwi 2 (2002, 2004)
BC Card Cup 1 (2002)
KTF Cup 1 (2002)
New Pro King 1 (2002)
SK Gas Cup 1 (2002) 1 (2000)
KT Cup 1 (2003)
Maxim Cup 5 (2005–2007, 2014, 2016) 1 (2013)
Prices Information Cup 3 (2006-2007, 2010) 1 (2008)
KBS Cup 3 (2006, 2014, 2016) 4 (2001, 2004, 2009, 2015)
Guksu 2 (2007, 2009) 1 (2014)
Myungin 4 (2007-2008, 2012, 2016) 1 (2013)
Olleh KT Cup 2 (2010, 2011)
Siptan 1 (2011)
Total 30 17
Continental
Title Wins Runners-up
China–Korea New Pro Wang 1 (2002)
China–Korea Tengen 1 (2001)
Total 1 1
International
Title Wins Runners-up
Fujitsu Cup 3 (2002-2003, 2005) 1 (2010)
LG Cup 2 (2003, 2008) 2 (2001, 2009)
Samsung Cup 4 (2004, 2007-2008, 2012) 1 (2013)
World Oza 2 (2004, 2006)
Zhonghuan Cup 1 (2005)
Asian TV Cup 4 (2007, 2008, 2014, 2015) 2 (2009, 2017)
BC Card Cup 2 (2010-2011)
Chunlan Cup 1 (2011) 1 (2013)
Mlily Cup (梦百合杯) 1 (2016)
Total 18 9
Career total
Total 49 27[26]

Korean Baduk LeagueEdit

Season Team Place Record
2007 Team No.1 Fire Insurance (Captain) 4th place 9–5[27]
2008 Team No. 1 Fire Insurance (Captain) 4th place 13–3[28]
2010 Team Shinan Chunil Salt (Captain) Champions 16–2[29]
2011 Team Shinan Chunil Salt (Captain) 7th place 1–2[30]

Chinese A LeagueEdit

Season Team Place Record
2007 Team Guizhou (Captain) 2nd place 9–3[31]
2008 Team Guizhou (Captain) 2nd place 8–0[32]
2009 Team Guizhou (Captain) 8th place 6–4[33]

TriviaEdit

At Tygem Lee Sedol plays as LeeShiShi.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Lee SeDol. gobase.org. accessed 22 June 2010.
  2. ^ "Google vs. Go: can AI beat the ultimate board game?". The Verge. Retrieved 2016-03-15. 
  3. ^ Lee Sedol Interview. justplaygo.com, accessed 22 June 2010. Archived July 5, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ An Younggil. "Biography of Lee Sedol". Retrieved 2013-02-11. 
  5. ^ An Younggil. "Interview with Lee Sedol". Retrieved 2013-02-11. 
  6. ^ King of Kings (Final): "gjopok" vs. "idontca1", game 3. gosensations.com, accessed 19 February 2012
  7. ^ "서울경제:". economy.hankooki.com. Archived from the original on 2016-03-12. Retrieved 2016-03-12. 
  8. ^ Sensei's Library: Lee Sedol - Hong Chang Sik - ladder game
  9. ^ "Google to Livestream 'Go' Battle Between World Champ, AI Tech". PCMAG. Retrieved 2016-02-08. 
  10. ^ Elizabeth Gibney (27 January 2016). "Go players react to computer defeat". 
  11. ^ "Computer Says Go". The Economist. 30 January 2016. Retrieved 4 February 2016. 
  12. ^ "YouTube will livestream Google's AI playing Go superstar Lee Sedol in March". VentureBeat. Retrieved 2016-02-08. 
  13. ^ "[인터뷰] 이세돌 "5대 0으로 이기지 않으면 의미 없다고 생각해"". news.jtbc.joins.com (in Korean). Retrieved 2016-02-25. 
  14. ^ "Yonhap News Agency". English.yonhapnews.co.kr. Retrieved 2017-12-10. 
  15. ^ "AlphaGo defeats Lee Sedol in first game of historic man vs machine match". 
  16. ^ "Google's AI Wins Pivotal Game Two In Match With Go Grandmaster". 
  17. ^ "AlphaGo beats Lee Sedol in third consecutive Go game". 
  18. ^ – March 13, 2016 (2016-03-13). "Lee Sedol defeats AlphaGo in masterful comeback - Game 4". Gogameguru.com. Retrieved 2017-12-10. 
  19. ^ a b Lee Se-dol shows AlphaGo beatable, Korea Times
  20. ^ "Google's AlphaGo AI beats Lee Se-dol again to win Go series 4-1". 
  21. ^ [Q&As] 'I'll never exchange this win for anything in the world', Korea Times
  22. ^ "한국 바둑계 '감'으로 나섰다가 '아뿔싸'" [Korea Baduk Association ventured into "without thought" and "Yow"] (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. March 16, 2016. 
  23. ^ "Lee Sedol" (in Korean). Korea Baduk Association. Retrieved 6 January 2018. 
  24. ^ Username *. "Lee Sedol | Search by Player". Go4Go. Retrieved 2017-12-10. 
  25. ^ "Win-Loss Ranking - Go to Everyone!". K2ss.info. Retrieved 2017-12-10. 
  26. ^ Lee Sedol 9p Archived 2011-05-24 at the Wayback Machine. gogameworld.com, accessed 22 June 2010
  27. ^ "2007 Korean Baduk League". igokisen.web.fc2.com. Retrieved 13 June 2011. [permanent dead link]
  28. ^ "2008 Korean Baduk League". igokisen.web.fc2.com. Retrieved 13 June 2011. [permanent dead link]
  29. ^ "2010 Korean Baduk League". igokisen.web.fc2.com. Retrieved 13 June 2011. [permanent dead link]
  30. ^ "2011 Korean Baduk League". igokisen.web.fc2.com. Retrieved 13 June 2011. [permanent dead link]
  31. ^ "2007 Chinese A League". igokisen.web.fc2.com. Retrieved 13 June 2011. [permanent dead link]
  32. ^ "2008 Chinese A League". igokisen.web.fc2.com. Retrieved 13 June 2011. [permanent dead link]
  33. ^ "2009 Chinese A League". igokisen.web.fc2.com. Retrieved 13 June 2011. [permanent dead link]

External linksEdit