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Lee J. Jussim (born December 2, 1955) is an American social psychologist.[2][3]

Lee Jussim
Lee Jussim 2018.jpg
Born (1955-12-02) December 2, 1955 (age 63)
NationalityAmerican
Alma materUniversity of Michigan
Known forStereotype accuracy
Awards1997 Award for Distinguished Scientific Awards for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology from the American Psychological Association[1]
Scientific career
FieldsSocial psychology
InstitutionsRutgers University
ThesisInterpersonal expectations in social interaction: Self-fulfilling prophecies, confirmatory biases, and accuracy (1987)

Contents

Early life and educationEdit

At age 5, Jussim's family moved into a Brooklyn-area public housing where they lived until he was 12. When he was 13, his family moved to Levittown, Long Island and his mother died of cancer.[2]

Jussim dropped out of college twice before he met Lisa Baum who he would later marry in 1975. They have three children together. Jussim enrolled at the University of Massachusetts Boston in 1979 in pursuit of a degree in marketing. He took two courses in psychology (memory and learning, and social psychology) and enthusiastically sought to become a social psychologist.

His early work in social psychology began as a doctoral student at the University of Michigan where he collaborated with Lerita Coleman (assistant professor) on data from two lab studies that conflicted with the popularly endorsed concept of self-fulfilling prophecy and racist hiring practices of White employers. Their data indicated that students’ self-concept is not shaped by teacher feedback and that White employers evaluate African-American job applicants more favorably than White applicants. These results were unpopular in the academic sphere and inconsistent with a large body of evidence indicating the opposite. But he did not see this reception as reason to abandon them. On the contrary, it motivated him to stand by his findings as a matter of principle.[2]

He focused his dissertation on the well-researched area of teacher expectancies and was encouraged to conduct observations in the real world instead of the laboratory. The data he generated did not conform to popular opinion at the time that supported the pervasive effect of teacher expectancies. It suggested that teacher expectations did not have a significant effect on student performance and that teachers’ expectations predicted student achievement because they were accurate.[4] He graduated with a doctorate in social psychology in 1987 and assumed a teaching position at Rutgers University that same year.[5][6]

Career and researchEdit

Jussim runs the Social Perception Lab at Rutgers University, Livingston Campus. The lab studies how people perceive, think about, and judge others.[7] He is a researcher in the fields of person perception, stereotype accuracy and bias and has been integral in the initiative for viewpoint diversity which advocates a set of political causes in academia and social science research.[8] In support of the latter, he helped start Heterodox Academy, a collection of academics advocating the same political causes in their respective fields.[9] Dr. Jussim also runs Rabble Rouser, a blog that identifies errors in social psychology research and practice, suggests ways to improve it and discusses societal implications.[10]

He has published and spoken extensively on scientific integrity and distortions in science motivated by politics, stereotype accuracy, prejudice, bias, self-fulfilling prophecy, and social constructionism. His works have won professional wards: his 2012 book Social Perception and Social Reality: Why Accuracy Dominates Bias and Self-Fulfilling Prophecy won an American Association of Publishers' Prize for best book in psychology,[11] and his 1991 book Social Belief and Social Reality: A Reflection-Construction Model received the Gordon Allport Prize for Research in Intergroup Relations.[12] During his recent 2013–2014 sabbatical, he worked with colleagues at Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in the Behavioral Sciences and co-founded Stanford’s Best Practices in Science group.[13]

Jussim has also published papers on the topic of antisemitism.[14][15]

BibliographyEdit

Jussim has published a number of edited books as well as one book on his own. He is also the author of more than 100 academic articles and book chapters, as well as articles written for non-academic outlets such as Quillette.

Selected academic articles and book chaptersEdit

As of October 2018, Jussim's five most cited articles/chapters were (each with more than 500 citations according to Google Scholar):

  • Jussim, L., & Harber, K. D. (2005). Teacher expectations and self-fulfilling prophecies: Knowns and unknowns, resolved and unresolved controversies. Personality and social psychology review, 9(2), 131-155.
  • Jussim, L. (1986). Self-fulfilling prophecies: A theoretical and integrative review. Psychological Review, 93(4), 429.
  • Jussim, L. (1991). Social perception and social reality: A reflection-construction model. Psychological Review, 98(1), 54.
  • Jussim, L., Eccles, J., & Madon, S. (1996). Social perception, social stereotypes, and teacher expectations: Accuracy and the quest for the powerful self-fulfilling prophecy. In Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 28, pp. 281–388). Academic Press.
  • Jussim, L., & Eccles, J. S. (1992). Teacher expectations: II. Construction and reflection of student achievement. Journal of personality and social psychology, 63(6), 947.

Other academic articles and book chaptersEdit

  • Jussim, L., Stevens, S. T., Honeycutt, N., Anglin, S. M., & Fox, N. (in press). Scientific gullibility. To appear in The social psychology of gullibility, (J. Forgas & R. Baumeister, Eds). The Sydney Symposium on Social Psychology.
  • Anglin & Jussim (2017). Science and politics: Do people support the conduct and dissemination of politicized research? Journal of Social and Political Psychology, Vol. 5(1), 142–172, doi:10.5964/jspp.v5i1.427.
  • Jussim, Crawford, Anglin, Stevens & Duarte. (2016). Interpretations and methods: Towards a more effectively self-correcting social psychology. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.
  • Jussim, Crawford, Stevens, & Anglin (2016). The politics of social psychological science: Distortions in the social psychology of intergroup relations. In P. Valdesolo and J. Graham (eds), Claremont Symposium on Social Psychology and Politics.
  • Jussim, Crawford, Stevens, Anglin, & Duarte (2016). Can high moral purposes undermine scientific integrity? To appear in J. Forgas, P. van Lange, & L. *Jussim (eds), The Sydney Symposium on the Social Psychology of Morality.
  • Duarte, Crawford, Stern, Haidt, Jussim, & Tetlock (2015). Political diversity will improve social psychological science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences. (includes target article, commentaries, and our reply).
  • Jussim, L., Crawford, J.T., Anglin, S. M., Chambers, J., Stevens, S. T., & Cohen, F. (2016). Stereotype accuracy: One of the largest relationships and most replicable effects in all of social psychology. In T. Nelson (ed.), Handbook of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination (2nd ed), pp. 31-63. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Jussim, L., Crawford, J.T., & Rubinstein, R. S. (2015). Stereotype (in)accuracy in perceptions of groups and individuals. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 24, 490-497.
  • Crawford, Duarte, Haidt, Jussim, Stern, & Tetlock (2015). It may be harder than we thought, but political diversity will (still) improve social psychological science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences.
  • Jussim, Crawford, Anglin, & Stevens (2015). Ideological bias in social psychological research. In J. Forgas, K. Fiedler, & W. Crano (eds), Sydney Symposium on Social Psychology and Politics.
  • Jussim, Krosnick, Vazire, Stevens, & Anglin (2015). Toward robust scientific research methods in the United States. An overview invited by John Holdren, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.
  • Jussim, L. (2012). Liberal privilege in academic psychology, Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7, 504-507.
  • Jussim, L., Cain, T., Crawford, J., Harber, K., & Cohen, F. (2009). The unbearable accuracy of stereotypes. Pp. 199-227 in T. Nelson (ed.), Handbook of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination. (Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum).
  • Cohen, F., Jussim, L., Harber, K., & Bhasin, G. (2009). Modern anti-Semitism and anti-Israeli Attitudes. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 97, 290-306.
  • Jussim, L., Robustelli, S. & Cain, T. (2009). Teacher expectations and self-fulfilling prophecies. Pp. 349-380 in Handbook of Motivation at School, A. Wigfield and K. Wentzel (eds). Erlbaum: Mahwah, NJ.
  • Jussim, L. (2005). Accuracy: Criticisms, controversies, criteria, components, and cognitive processes.Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 37, 1-93.
  • Jussim, L., Harber, K. D., Crawford, J. T., Cain, T. R., Cohen, F. (2005). Social reality makes the social mind: Self-fulfilling prophecy, stereotypes, bias, and accuracy. Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems, 6, 85-102.
  • Jussim, L., & Harber, K. D. (2005). Teacher Expectations and Self-Fulfilling Prophecies: Knowns and Unknowns, Resolved and Unresolved Controversies. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 9, 131-155.
  • Madon, S. J., Jussim, L., Keiper, S., Eccles, J., Smith, A., & Palumbo, P. (1998). The accuracy and power of sex, social class, and ethnic stereotypes: Naturalistic studies in person perception. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 24, 1304-1318.
  • Jussim, L., Eccles, J., & Madon, S. J.(1996). Social perception, social stereotypes, and teacher expectations: Accuracy and the quest for the powerful self-fulfilling prophecy. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 29, 281-388.
  • Jussim, L., McCauley, C. R., & Lee, Y. T. (1995). Why study stereotype accuracy and inaccuracy? In Lee, Y.T., Jussim, L., McCauley, C. R. (eds.), Stereotype accuracy: Toward appreciating group differences (pp. 3-28). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.
  • Jussim, L. (1991). Social perception and social reality: A reflection-construction model. Psychological Review, 98, 54-73.
  • Jussim, L., Coleman, L., & Lerch, L.(1987). The nature of stereotypes: A comparison and integration of three theories. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 52, 536-546.
  • Lee, Y. T., Jussim, L., & McCauley, C. R. (Eds.). Stereotype accuracy: Toward appreciating group differences. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.
  • Madon, S., Jussim, L., Guyll, M., Nofziger, H., Salib, E., Willard, J., & Scherr, K. C. (in press). The accumulation of stereotype-based self-fulfilling prophecies. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.
  • Rubinstein, R., Jussim, L., & Stevens, S. T. (in press). Reliance on individuating information and stereotypes in implicit and explicit person perception. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

Essays, blogs, and editorialsEdit

  • Haidt, J., & Jussim, L. (February 2016). Psychological science and viewpoint diversity. Presidential Column of The APS Observer, Association for Psychology Science.
  • Haidt, J., & Jussim, L. (May 6, 2016). Hard truths about race on campus. The Wall Street Journal.
  • Jussim, L. (August 2016). Truth in stereotypes. Aeon.

Short papersEdit

  • Jussim, L. (In press). Stereotypes. To appear in Cambridge Dictionary of Psychology, (D. Matsumoto, Ed), Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK.
  • Jussim, L. (In press). Stereotyping. To appear in Cambridge Dictionary of Psychology, (D. Matsumoto, Ed), Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK.
  • Jussim, L. (In press). Teacher expectations. To appear in The Psychology of Classroom Learning, (E. Anderman, & L. Anderman, eds.). Farmington Hills, MI: Thomson Gale Publishers.
  • Jussim, L. (In press). Self-fulfilling prophecies. To appear in Encyclopedia of Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, Levine and Michael Hogg (Co-Editors). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Edited booksEdit

  • Stereotype Accuracy: Toward Appreciating Group Differences (APA Science Volumes), 1995, American Psychological Association
  • Self and Identity: Fundamental Issues (Rutgers Series on Self and Social Identity), 1997, Oxford University Press
  • Social Identity, Intergroup Conflict, and Conflict Reduction (Rutgers Series on Self and Social Identity), 2001, Oxford University Press
  • The Social Psychology of Morality (Sydney Symposium of Social Psychology), 2016, Routledge
  • Politics of Social Psychology (Frontiers of Social Psychology), 2017, Psychology Press

BooksEdit

  • The Politics of Social Psychology, 2018, Routledge/Taylor&Francis.
  • Social Perception and Social Reality: Why Accuracy Dominates Bias and Self-Fulfilling Prophecy, 2012, Oxford University Press

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ No authorship indicated; indicated, No authorship. "Distinguished Scientific Awards for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology". American Psychologist. 52 (4): 318–329. doi:10.1037/0003-066x.52.4.318.
  2. ^ a b c http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~jussim/life.html
  3. ^ "Lee Jussim". Library of Congress.
  4. ^ How a Rebellious Scientist Uncovered the Surprising Truth About Stereotypes [1]
  5. ^ "vita.html". www.rci.rutgers.edu. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  6. ^ "Lee Jussim Ph.D. – Psychology Today". www.psychologytoday.com. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  7. ^ Grace, Patrick. "Dr. Lee Jussim". www.rci.rutgers.edu. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  8. ^ http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~jussim/papers.html
  9. ^ "Home". HeterodoxAcademy.org. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  10. ^ "Rabble Rouser". Psychology Today. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  11. ^ Grace, Patrick. "Lee Jussim, Selected Papers". www.rci.rutgers.edu. Retrieved 19 August 2017.
  12. ^ Gordon Allport Prize for Research in Intergroup Relations
  13. ^ "Dr. Lee Jussim's Bio 12". www.rci.rutgers.edu. Retrieved 12 August 2017.
  14. ^ http://www.cco.regener-online.de/2011_1/pdf/cohen.pdf
  15. ^ http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2009-10712-006

External linksEdit