Leduc (provincial electoral district)

Leduc was a provincial electoral district in Alberta, Canada, mandated to return a single member to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1905 to 1971 and again from 1993 to 2004.[1]

Leduc
Alberta electoral district
Defunct provincial electoral district
LegislatureLegislative Assembly of Alberta
District created1905
District abolished1971
District re-created1993
District re-abolished2001
First contested1905
Last contested2001

HistoryEdit

Leduc was one of the original 25 electoral districts contested in the 1905 Alberta general election upon Alberta joining Confederation in September 1905. The electoral district was named for the City of Leduc in central Alberta.

Leduc was dissolved in the 1971 electoral district re-distribution to form the Wetaskiwin-Leduc and Drayton Valley electoral districts. Leduc would be recreated in the 1993 electoral district re-distribution from Wetaskiwin-Leduc and Camrose electoral districts.

Leduc would once again be dissolved in the 2003 electoral boundary re-distribution and become Leduc-Beaumont-Devon.[2]

Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs)Edit

Members of the Legislative Assembly for Leduc
Assembly Years Member Party
1st  1905–1909     Robert Telford Liberal
2nd  1909–1913
3rd  1913–1917 Stanley G. Tobin
4th  1917–1921
5th  1921–1926
6th  1926–1930     Douglas C. Breton United Farmers
7th  1930–1935     Arthur Percy Mitchell Liberal
8th  1935–1940     Ronald E. Ansley Social Credit
9th  1940–1944
10th  1944–1948
11th  1948–1952
12th  1952–1955     Independent Social Credit
13th  1955–1959
14th  1959–1963
15th  1963–1967     James Douglas Henderson Social Credit
16th  1967–1971
See Wetaskiwin-Leduc electoral district from 1971-1993,
Camrose electoral district from 1971-1993
and Drayton Valley electoral district from 1971-1993
23rd  1993–1997     Terry Kirkland Liberal
24th  1997–2001     Albert Klapstein Progressive Conservative
25th  2001–2004
See Leduc-Beaumont-Devon electoral district from 2004-2012

Ronald E. Ansley despite becoming increasingly unhappy with the Social Credit government over implementation of Douglas monetary reforms ran for re-election in the 1948 Alberta general election. He was returned to office for his fourth term easily defeating the two other candidates.[3]

Shortly after the election the Social Credit voted to exclude Albert Bourcier from the Social Credit caucus and expelled some other Douglasite Social Creditors from the party through a motion passed at the 1948 Social Credit Annual General Meeting. Ansley who was a member of the group was not expelled and openly opposed the expulsions.[4]

The Social Credit League formally asked the government in 1949 to expel all members of caucus including Ansley who held membership in the Douglas Social Credit Council.[5]

In 1951 he openly led a revolt that defeated the Mineral Taxation Act 29 to 15 in a recorded division on third reading.[6] He was expelled from caucus on June 16, 1952 after attending a nomination convention asking Bourcier to run as an Independent Social Credit candidate.

The Leduc Social Credit Constituency Association nominated Ansley as their candidate with a clause in the motion to endorse stating that he would be supported regardless of what banner he runs under.[7] After being unable to run as a straight Social Credit candidate, Ansley stood for re-election as an Independent Social Credit candidate. He won a hotly contested race on the second ballot defeating two other candidates to return to his fifth term in office.[8]

Ansley ran for a sixth term in office in the 1955 Alberta general election. The race five way race was very closely contested. Ansely ended up holding on to his seat by winning in the fourth vote count.[9]

Ansley ran for a seventh term in the 1959 Alberta general election. He held his seat easily defeating two other candidates as no official Social Credit candidate ran against him.[10]

Ansley ran for an eighth term in office in the 1963 Alberta general election. He was defeated by Social Credit candidate James Douglas Henderson finishing a distant third place in a field of six candidates.[11]

Election resultsEdit

1905 general electionEdit

1905 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Robert Telford 481 63.46%
Conservative C. E. A. Simonds 277 36.54%
Total 758
Rejected, spoiled and declined N/A
Eligible electors / turnout 758 N/A
Liberal pickup new district.
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1905 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1909 general electionEdit

1909 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Robert Telford Acclaimed
Total N/A
Rejected, spoiled and declined N/A
Eligible electors / turnout N/A N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1909 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1913 general electionEdit

1913 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Stanley G. Tobin 582 57.17%
Conservative George Curry 436 42.83%
Total 1,018
Rejected, spoiled and declined N/A
Eligible electors / turnout 1,504 67.69%
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1913 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1917 general electionEdit

1917 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Stanley G. Tobin 1,707 73.67% 16.50%
Conservative George Currie 610 26.33% -16.50%
Total 2,317
Rejected, spoiled and declined N/A
Eligible electors / turnout 2,891 80.15% 12.46%
Liberal hold Swing 16.50%
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1917 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1921 general electionEdit

1921 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Stanley G. Tobin 1,351 50.19% -23.49%
United Farmers D. S. Muir 1,341 49.81%
Total 2,692
Rejected, spoiled and declined N/A
Eligible electors / turnout N/A N/A
Liberal hold Swing -23.49%
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1921 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1926 general electionEdit

1926 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
First count
United Farmers Douglas C . Breton 1,961 45.13% -4.78%
Liberal C. W. Carroll 1,561 35.93% -14.26%
Conservative C. B. Kidd 823 18.94%
Total 4,345
Ballot transfer results
United Farmers Douglas C . Breton 2,334 58.31%
Liberal C.W. Carroll 1,669 41.69%
Total 4,003
Rejected, spoiled and declined 229
Eligible electors / turnout 6,337 72.18%
United Farmers gain from Liberal Swing N/A
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1926 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Instant-runoff voting requires a candidate to receive a plurality (greater than 50%) of the votes.
As no candidate received a plurality of votes, the bottom candidate was eliminated and their 2nd place votes were applied to both other candidates until one received a plurality

1930 general electionEdit

1930 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Arthur Percy Mitchell 1,468 51.04% 15.10%
United Farmers Douglas C . Breton 1,408 48.96% 3.83%
Total 2,876
Rejected, spoiled and declined 137
Eligible electors / turnout 4,623 65.17% -7.01%
Liberal gain from United Farmers Swing N/A
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1930 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1935 general electionEdit

1935 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit Ronald E. Ansley 2,940 61.66%
Liberal Arthur Percy Mitchell 1,305 27.37% -23.67%
United Farmers J. E. Cook 357 7.49% -41.47%
Conservative M. E. Von Amerongen 166 3.48%
Total 4,768
Rejected, spoiled and declined 135
Eligible electors / turnout 5,978 82.02% 16.84%
Social Credit gain from Liberal Swing 16.10%
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1935 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1940 general electionEdit

1940 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit Ronald E. Ansley 2,141 53.81% -7.85%
Independent J. A. Rivard 1,106 27.80%
Co-operative Commonwealth A. E. Faulkner 732 18.40%
Total 3,979
Rejected, spoiled and declined 223
Eligible electors / turnout 6,380 65.86% -16.16%
Social Credit hold Swing -4.14%
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1940 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1944 general electionEdit

1944 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit Ronald E. Ansley 2,764 67.33% 13.53%
Co-operative Commonwealth J. E. Cook 1,186 28.89% 10.50%
Labor–Progressive H. V. Broadbent 155 3.78%
Total 4,105
Rejected, spoiled and declined 74
Eligible electors / turnout 6,218 67.21% 1.35%
Social Credit hold Swing 6.21%
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1944 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1948 general electionEdit

1948 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit Ronald E. Ansley 2,548 58.03% -9.30%
Co-operative Commonwealth John King 1,071 24.39% -4.50%
Liberal John Edward Duggan 772 17.58%
Total 4,391
Rejected, spoiled and declined 333
Eligible electors / turnout 7,716 61.22% -5.98%
Social Credit hold Swing -2.40%
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1948 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1952 general electionEdit

1952 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
First count
Independent Social Credit Ronald E. Ansley 2,051 44.70%
Co-operative Commonwealth Andrew Borys 1,331 29.00% 4.61%
Social Credit George H. Thompson 1,207 26.30% -31.73%
Total 4,589
Ballot transfer results
Independent Social Credit Ronald E. Ansley 2,035 52.10%
Co-operative Commonwealth Andrew Borys 1,871 47.90%
Total 3,906
Rejected, spoiled and declined 368
Eligible electors / turnout 7,803 63.66% 2.44%
Independent Social Credit gain from Social Credit Swing N/A
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1952 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Instant-runoff voting requires a candidate to receive a plurality (greater than 50%) of the votes.
As no candidate received a plurality of votes, the bottom candidate was eliminated and their 2nd place votes were applied to both other candidates until one received a plurality

1955 general electionEdit

1955 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
First count
Independent Social Credit Ronald E. Ansley 1,338 27.92% -16.78%
Co-operative Commonwealth Andrew Borys 1,147 23.94% -5.06%
Liberal W. F. Borgstede 963 20.10%
Social Credit A. E. Zeiner 950 19.82% -6.48%
Conservative Emanuel Prycz 394 8.22%
Total 4,792
Ballot transfer results
Independent Social Credit Ronald E. Ansley 2,035 52.10%
Liberal W. F. Borgstede 1,871 47.90%
Total 3,906
Rejected, spoiled and declined 345
Eligible electors / turnout 5,137 68.20% 4.54%
Independent Social Credit hold Swing N/A
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1955 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.
Instant-runoff voting requires a candidate to receive a plurality (greater than 50%) of the votes.
As no candidate received a plurality of votes, the bottom candidate was eliminated and their 2nd place votes were applied to both other candidates until one received a plurality

1959 general electionEdit

1959 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Independent Social Credit Ronald E. Ansley 2,334 51.82% 23.90%
Progressive Conservative Peter Wyllie 1,494 33.17%
Co-operative Commonwealth Andrew Borys 676 15.01% -8.93%
Total 4,504
Rejected, spoiled and declined 8
Eligible electors / turnout 7,113 63.43% -4.77%
Independent Social Credit hold Swing N/A
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1959 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1963 general electionEdit

1963 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit James Douglas Henderson 1,898 39.86%
Progressive Conservative Peter Wyllie 971 20.39% -12.78%
Independent Social Credit Ronald E. Ansley 731 15.35% -36.47%
New Democratic Andrew Borys 613 12.87% -2.14%
Liberal Ron Hayter 461 9.68%
Alberta Unity Movement Michael F. Hold 88 1.85%
Total 4,762
Rejected, spoiled and declined 14
Eligible electors / turnout 7,574 63.06% -0.38%
Social Credit gain from Independent Social Credit Swing 0.41%
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1963 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1967 general electionEdit

1967 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Social Credit James Douglas Henderson 2,193 45.66% 5.80%
Progressive Conservative Emanuel Prycz 1,206 25.11% 4.72%
New Democratic Alex A. Sklarenko 1,021 21.26% 8.38%
Liberal Russell Olekshy 383 7.97% -1.71%
Total 4,803
Rejected, spoiled and declined 29
Eligible electors / turnout 7,578 63.76% 0.71%
Social Credit hold Swing 0.54%
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1967 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1993 general electionEdit

1993 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Terry Kirkland 6,823 49.76%
Progressive Conservative Donald H. Sparrow 5,884 42.91%
New Democratic Jeff Lambert 812 5.92%
Natural Law Larry Bogart 192 1.40%
Total 13,711
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 15
Eligible electors / Turnout 21,200 64.75%
Liberal pickup new district.
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1993 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

1997 general electionEdit

1997 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Albert Klapstein 6,857 51.51% 8.60%
Liberal Terry Kirkland 4,797 36.04% -13.73%
Social Credit Henry Neumann 891 6.69%
New Democratic Bill Schlacht 767 5.76% -0.16%
Total 13,312
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 24
Eligible electors / Turnout 22,244 59.95% -4.79%
Progressive Conservative gain from Liberal Swing 4.31%
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 1997 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

2001 general electionEdit

2001 Alberta general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Progressive Conservative Albert Klapstein 9,235 67.08% 15.57%
Liberal Joyce Assen 3,575 25.97% -10.07%
New Democratic Leilani O'Malley 957 6.95% 1.19%
Total 13,767
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 81
Eligible electors / Turnout 24,286 57.02% -2.93%
Progressive Conservative hold Swing 12.82%
Source(s)
Source: "Leduc Official Results 2001 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved May 21, 2020.

Plebiscite resultsEdit

1957 liquor plebisciteEdit

1957 Alberta liquor plebiscite results: Grande Prairie[12]
Question A: Do you approve additional types of outlets for the
sale of beer, wine and spirituous liquor subject to a local vote?
Ballot Choice Votes %
Yes 1,701 62.95%
No 1,001 37.05%
Total Votes 2,702 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 10
6,996 Eligible Electors, Turnout 38.77%

On October 30, 1957 a stand alone plebiscite was held province wide in all 50 of the then current provincial electoral districts in Alberta. The government decided to consult Alberta voters to decide on liquor sales and mixed drinking after a divisive debate in the Legislature. The plebiscite was intended to deal with the growing demand for reforming antiquated liquor control laws.[13]

The plebiscite was conducted in two parts. Question A asked in all districts, asked the voters if the sale of liquor should be expanded in Alberta, while Question B asked in a handful of districts within the corporate limits of Calgary and Edmonton asked if men and woman were allowed to drink together in establishments.[12]

Province wide Question A of the plebiscite passed in 33 of the 50 districts while Question B passed in all five districts. Leduc voted in favour of the proposal by a near landslide majority. Voter turnout in the district was abysmal, falling well under the province wide average of 46%.[12]

Official district returns were released to the public on December 31, 1957.[12] The Social Credit government in power at the time did not considered the results binding.[14] However the results of the vote led the government to repeal all existing liquor legislation and introduce an entirely new Liquor Act.[15]

Municipal districts lying inside electoral districts that voted against the Plebiscite were designated Local Option Zones by the Alberta Liquor Control Board and considered effective dry zones, business owners that wanted a license had to petition for a binding municipal plebiscite in order to be granted a license.[16]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Election results for Leduc". abheritage.ca. Wayback Machine: Heritage Community Foundation. Archived from the original on December 8, 2010. Retrieved 8 June 2020.
  2. ^ Alberta Electoral Boundaries Commission (February 2003). "Proposed Electoral Division Areas, Boundaries, and Names for Alberta. Final Report to the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta". Legislative Assembly of Alberta. Retrieved May 29, 2020.
  3. ^ "Leduc Official Results 1948 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved March 6, 2010.
  4. ^ "S.C. Caucus Agrees Exclude Bourcier". Vol XLI No. 293. The Lethbridge Herald. November 26, 1948. p. 2.
  5. ^ "Heavy Slate". Vol XLII No. 54. The Lethbridge Herald. February 15, 1949. pp. 1–2.
  6. ^ "Manning Won't Resign". Vol XLIV No 93. The Lethbridge Herald. March 31, 1951. p. 1. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  7. ^ "Leduc Socred Reaffirm Ansley for Nomination". XLV No. 178. The Lethbridge Herald. July 10, 1952. p. 16.
  8. ^ "Leduc Official Results 1952 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved March 6, 2010.
  9. ^ "Leduc Official Results 1955 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved March 6, 2010.
  10. ^ "Leduc Official Results 1959 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved March 6, 2010.
  11. ^ "Leduc Official Results 1963 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Archived from the original on June 12, 2011. Retrieved March 6, 2010.
  12. ^ a b c d Alberta Gazette. 53 (December 31 ed.). Government of Alberta. 1957. pp. 2, 247–2, 249.
  13. ^ "Albertans Vote 2 to 1 For More Liquor Outlets". Vol L No 273. The Lethbridge Herald. October 31, 1957. pp. 1–2.
  14. ^ "No Sudden Change In Alberta Drinking Habits Is Seen". Vol L No 267. The Lethbridge Herald. October 24, 1957. p. 1.
  15. ^ "Entirely New Act On Liquor". Vol LI No 72. The Lethbridge Herald. March 5, 1958. p. 1.
  16. ^ "Bill 81". Alberta Bills 12th Legislature 1st Session. Government of Alberta. 1958. p. 40.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit