Leblon (Portuguese: /leˈblõ/) is a neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It is also the name of the local beach. The neighborhood is located in the South Zone of the city, between Lagoa Rodrigo de Freitas, Morro Dois Irmãos and the Jardim de Alah channel, bordering the Gávea, Ipanema, Lagoa, and Vidigal neighborhoods. It is regarded as a very affluent area, having the most expensive price per residential square meter in Latin America.[3]

Leblon
Neighborhood
Panoramic view of Leblon
Panoramic view of Leblon
Leblon is located in Rio de Janeiro
Leblon
Leblon
Location in Rio de Janeiro
Leblon is located in Brazil
Leblon
Leblon
Leblon (Brazil)
Coordinates: 22°59′00″S 43°13′33″W / 22.98333°S 43.22583°W / -22.98333; -43.22583Coordinates: 22°59′00″S 43°13′33″W / 22.98333°S 43.22583°W / -22.98333; -43.22583
Country Brazil
StateRio de Janeiro (RJ)
Municipality/CityRio de Janeiro
ZoneSouth Zone
Administrative RegionLagoa[1]
Area
 • Total2.15 km2 (0.83 sq mi)
Population
 (2010)[2]
 • Total46,044

Leblon began as a quilombo of escaped slaves created by a Portuguese abolitionist landowner.

EtymologyEdit

The neighborhood is named for Carlos Leblon, a whaling empresario of French origin who possessed a chácara in the region since 1845. Before the area was urbanized it was known as Campo do Leblon (Leblon's Field).

Early historyEdit

The Quilombo of Leblon was a quilombo (settlement of escaped African slaves) that existed at the end of the 19th century in the present-day region of Clube Campestre da Guanabara and surroundings from what is now Rua Timothy Da Costa to Morro Dois Irmãos (in English "Two Brothers Hill") in Rio de Janeiro.[4]

The creator of the quilombo was the Portuguese José de Seixas Magalhães,[5] who dedicated himself to the manufacture and trade of suitcases.[6] and pod bags on Rua Gonçalves Dias, at the center of the city. His bags were made in a factory with steam engine. In addition to the luggage factory, Seixas also owned a farm in Leblon where he cultivated flowers with the help of slaves fugitives. Seixas hid the fugitives in the Leblon farm with the help of the main abolitionists from the capital of Empire, many of them members of Abolitionist Confederation. The Seixas flower farm was known as the "quilombo Leblon", a name that referred to the former owner of the region, the Frenchman Carlos Leblon. It was in the Quilombo do Leblon that Seixas cultivated his famous camellias, which were the symbol of the abolitionist movement.

The Quilombo do Leblon had the protection of Princess Isabel. As a token of gratitude, Seixas regularly supplied camellias to Isabel Palace, the princess’s residence in Laranjeiras (today, the seat of the government of the State of Rio de Janeiro). The camellias of Seixas adorned the Princess’s work table and her private chapel, where she made her prayers. In addition to the camellias, Seixas also offered the golden penalty to the Princess Regent who, later, on 13 May 1888, would be used to sign the Golden Law. The quilombo gave rise to the current name of the neighborhood of Leblon.

CharacteristicsEdit

 
Leblon Beach.
 
Residential buildings. Leblon has the most expensive price per residential square meter in Latin America.
 
Map of Leblon.

It is located west of Ipanema. In the north, it is bordered by Gávea and, in the west, by a towering hill called Dois Irmãos, which translates as "two brothers", because of its split peak.

Leblon in popular cultureEdit

Leblon is known for being a very wealthy and cosmopolitan neighborhood, with a lively nightlife across its bars, restaurants and nightclubs. Leblon has been either referenced or depicted in the following media:

In television:

In music:

Leblon has been the subject of many songs, such as

In the 1970s, Moraes Moreira, Patricia Rombauer, Dona Vavá, Pedro Sayad, Claudia Laplan, and Carlos van den Bosch were some of the neighborhood's most famous residents.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "RA VI - Lagoa" (in Portuguese). Prefeitura da Cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Retrieved 25 September 2014.
  2. ^ "Bairro: Leblon" (in Portuguese). Prefeitura da Cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Retrieved 25 September 2014.
  3. ^ "Leblon tem o metro quadrado mais caro do Brasil e a maior valorização". 11 January 2008.
  4. ^ Robinson, Alex; Robinson, Gardênia. Footprint Focus - Rio de Janeiro. p. 61. ISBN 1909268887.
  5. ^ Gearini, Victória (30 May 2021). "QUILOMBO DO LEBLON: CONHEÇA A HISTÓRIA DO LOCAL QUE FOI PALCO DO MOVIMENTO ABOLICIONISTA" (in Portuguese).
  6. ^ "Rio: Um olhar no tempo". Government of Brazil.

External linksEdit

  Media related to Leblon at Wikimedia Commons