Open main menu

Chairman of the Labour Party (UK)

  (Redirected from Labour Party Chair (2001))

The Chairman of the Labour Party in the United Kingdom is responsible for party administration, overseeing the General election campaigns of the Labour Party. When the Labour Party are in government, the Chairman is usually a member of the Cabinet holding a sinecure position such as Minister without Portfolio. The position was created by Tony Blair in the aftermath of the 2001 General Election.[1] The position is not to be confused with that of Chair of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party under the Labour Party Constitution. Originally considered a courtesy title, the role has a larger portfolio for organising election campaigning under Jeremy Corbyn, working alongside the Co-National Campaign Coordinator, Andrew Gwynne. [2] From 2007 to 2017, it was held concurrently by the party's Deputy Leader. The Labour Party is currently chaired by Ian Lavery, who was appointed following the 2017 general election.

Chairman of the Labour Party
Portrait of Ian Lavery in 2015
Incumbent
Ian Lavery

since 14 June 2017
Labour Party
AppointerLeader of the Labour Party
Term lengthAt Leader of the Labour Party's pleasure
Inaugural holderCharles Clarke
Formation9 June 2001
WebsiteLabour Party

List of Labour Party ChairmenEdit

Party Chair Term of Office Leader
Charles Clarke   9 June 2001 24 June 2002 Tony Blair
John Reid   24 October 2002 4 April 2003 Tony Blair
Ian McCartney 4 April 2003 5 May 2006 Tony Blair
Hazel Blears   5 May 2006 24 June 2007 Tony Blair
Harriet Harman   24 June 2007 12 September 2015 Gordon Brown
Herself (acting)
Ed Miliband
Herself (acting)
Tom Watson   12 September 2015 14 June 2017[3] Jeremy Corbyn
Ian Lavery   14 June 2017 Incumbent Jeremy Corbyn

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Roy Hattersley (26 July 2001). "Blair mistook his Clarke for a chair". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 May 2007.
  2. ^ Roy Hattersley (26 July 2001). "Blair mistook his Clarke for a chair". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 May 2007.
  3. ^ "Labour's Shadow Cabinet". Labour Party. 7 January 2016. Archived from the original on 18 January 2016.