La Raza metro station

La Raza (About this soundSpanish pronunciation ; Spanish transl. "the People";[2] lit. transl. "the Race"[2]) is a Mexico City Metro transfer station in the Gustavo A. Madero borough of Mexico City. It is a combined underground and at-grade station with two side platforms each, served by Lines 3 (the Light green line) and 5 (the Yellow line). La Raza station is located between Potrero and Tlatelolco stations on Line 3, and between Autobuses del Norte and Misterios stations on Line 5. It serves the colonias (neighborhoods) of Vallejo and Héroes de Nacozari. The station's pictogram depicts the Monumento a la Raza, a pyramid-shaped construction erected in honor of la Raza, Mexico's many native peoples and cultures, located near the station.

Pictogram of La Raza metro station. It features the silhouette of a Mesoamerican pyramid with an eagle at the top. La Raza
STC rapid transit
Several people walk through La Raza's Line 5 tunnel. The walls display multiple science and astronomy pictures.
Various scientific images are displayed in La Raza's transfer tunnel (pictured)
LocationMexico City Metro Line 3 Insurgentes Norte Avenue
Mexico City Metro Line 5 Leoncavallo and Paganini streets
Gustavo A. Madero, Mexico City
Mexico
Coordinates19°28′13″N 99°08′13″W / 19.470153°N 99.136891°W / 19.470153; -99.136891Coordinates: 19°28′13″N 99°08′13″W / 19.470153°N 99.136891°W / 19.470153; -99.136891
Operated bySistema Transporte Colectivo Metro
Line(s)Line 3
Line 5
Platforms4 side platforms
Tracks4
ConnectionsMexico City Metrobús Line 1 icon.svg La Raza
Mexico City Metrobús Line 3 icon.svg La Raza
Trolleybus Line 1
Construction
Structure typeMexico City Metro Line 3 Underground
Mexico City Metro Line 5 At grade
Bicycle facilitiesBicycle parking-only
Disabled accessYes
History
OpenedMexico City Metro Line 3 25 August 1978
Mexico City Metro Line 5 1 July 1982
Passengers
2019Mexico City Metro Line 3 11,364,171[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 5 3,578,110[1]
RankMexico City Metro Line 3 38/195[1]
Mexico City Metro Line 5 155/195[1]
Services
Preceding station Mexico City Metro.svg STC Following station
Potrero Line 3 Tlatelolco
Autobuses del Norte Line 5 Misterios
toward Pantitlán
Location
La Raza is located in Mexico City
La Raza
Pictogram of La Raza metro station. It features the silhouette of a Mesoamerican pyramid with an eagle at the top. La Raza
Location within Mexico City

La Raza station opened on 25 August 1978 with service on Line 3 southward toward Hospital General station. Southeasterly service on Line 5 toward Pantitlán station began on 1 July 1982. The station facilities are accessible for the handicapped; inside, there is an Internet café, a library, and a mural titled Monstruos de fin de milenio, painted by Ariosto Otero Reyes. Outside, there is a bicycle parking station and a bus terminal.

The transfer tunnel has an approximate length of 600 meters (2,000 ft), the second-longest in the system. Inside the tunnel, there is a permanent science exhibition called El Túnel de la Ciencia ("The Tunnel of Science"), installed by the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) to provide scientific information to passengers, which was opened on 30 November 1988 . The exposition features information about science and astronomy using pictures.

LocationEdit

 
View of the La Raza bus terminal seen from the outside of Line 3

La Raza is a metro transfer station in the Gustavo A. Madero borough, in northern Mexico City. The Line 3 station lies on Insurgentes Norte Avenue, while the Line 5 station lies at the intersection of Leoncavallo and Paganini Streets, near Eje Central Lázaro Cárdenas. La Raza serves the colonias (neighborhoods) of Héroes de Nacozari and Vallejo. Within the system, it lies between Potrero and Tlatelolco stations on Line 3; on Line 5, the station lies between Autobuses del Norte and Misterios stations.[3]

The area is serviced by a Centro de transferecia modal [es] (CETRAM), a type of transport hub,[4] La Raza Metrobús transfer station (Lines 1 and 3),[5] and Line 1 (formerly Line A) of the trolleybus system.[3]

ExitsEdit

There are five exits.[3]

  • Northwest: Insurgentes Norte Avenue, colonia Vallejo (Line 3).
  • Southwest: Insurgentes Norte Avenue, colonia Vallejo (Line 3).
  • West: Insurgentes Norte Avenue, colonia Héroes de Nacozari (Line 3).
  • North: Leoncavallo and Paganini streets, colonia Vallejo (Line 5).
  • South: Paganini Street, colonia Vallejo (Line 5).

History and constructionEdit

 
La Raza's pictogram is based on the Monumento a la Raza pyramid (pictured)

Line 3 of the Mexico City Metro was built by Ingeniería de Sistemas de Transportes Metropolitano, Electrometro, and Cometro (a subsidiary of Grupo ICA [es]);[6] La Raza Line 3 opened on 25 August 1978, on the first day of the La Raza–Hospital General service.[7] Line 5 of the Mexico City Metro was built by Grupo ICA;[8] La Raza Line 5 opened on 1 July 1982, on the first day of the La Raza–Pantitlán service.[7]

The Line 3 station is underground,[9] while the Line 5 station is at grade.[10] The interstation stretch between La Raza and Misterios goes from surface to underground,[11] as does the Portero–La Raza stretch,[12] whose length is 1,106 meters (3,629 ft).[11] The La Raza–Tlatelolco interstation tunnel is 1,445 meters (4,741 ft) long.[11] The passenger transfer tunnel that connects Line 3 with Line 5 has an approximate length of 600 meters (2,000 ft),[13] and is the second-longest in the system after Atlalilco station, which connects Lines 8 and 12 (the Dark green and Golden lines, respectively), whose length is 880 meters (2,890 ft).[14]

La Raza's pictogram depicts the Monumento a la Raza, a pyramid-shaped construction erected in 1940 in honor of la Raza,[3][15] an ethnic movement by indigenous peoples of Mexico.[2] The facilities are accessible for the handicapped, and there is an Internet café, a help desk,[3] and a library.[16]

In 2008, Metro authorities had maintenance work done on Line 5 station's roof.[17] In August 2016, the Government of Mexico City built a bicycle parking station outside La Raza station.[18]

1995 shootingEdit

On 28 September 1995, Ernesto Cruz Jiménez, a Huixquilucan police officer, entered a parked train and shot seven passengers, killing two of them.[19][20] After being arrested, Cruz said he felt depressed. He was sentenced to 50 years in prison.[21][22] After the incident, the Government of Mexico City had walk-through metal detectors installed in the metro system.[20][23]

RidershipEdit

In 2019, La Raza station had an overall ridership of 14,942,281 passengers.[1] For Line 3, the ridership was 11,364,171 passengers— 31,134 passengers per day,[1] which was a decrease of 397,769 passengers compared to 2018.[24] For Line 5, the station had a ridership of 3,578,110—9,803 passengers per day,[1] which was a decrease of 46,541 compared to 2018.[24]

In 2019, the Line 3 station was the 38th busiest of the system's 195 stations, and the line's 6th busiest. The Line 5 station was the 155th busiest in the system and the line's 5th busiest.[1]

LandmarksEdit

El túnel de la cienciaEdit

The El túnel de la ciencia Museum (English for "The Tunnel of Science")[33][34] is the longest permanent exposition in the world.[35] Science and astronomy pictures and information are mounted on the walls located inside the transfer tunnel. It was opened on 30 November 1988—the first Latin American scientific exhibition installed in a public transport location.[16] Its purpose is to provide scientific information to passengers. It is aimed at young people since many of them are students at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN).[36] The tunnel's area is 6,177 square meters (66,490 sq ft)[37] and features images of the autumn-sky constellations,[36] planets and satellites, the Milky Way,[38] and, in the middle of the tunnel, there is a drawn-to-scale representation of the celestial sphere displaying the 12 zodiac constellations, drawn with luminous paint.[16][39] The exhibition was installed by Universum, UNAM's science museum.[36] It is estimated that 60,000 people visit it with the guided tour service.[16] In 2018, the Institute of Astonomy of the UNAM [es] remodeled the tunnel.[16]

Other exhibitionsEdit

On 25 November 2008, the Metro authorities installed the 1997 mural Monstruos de fin de milenio (lit. transl. Monsters from the End of the Millenium), which was painted and donated to the metro system by Mexican painter Ariosto Otero Reyes [es].[40]

In June 2015, the Center for Research and Advanced Studies (CINVESTAV) of the IPN exhibited multiple human brains, their anatomy, and some injuries they had suffered.[41] In April 2016, the Geology Museum of the UNAM [es] displayed rocks, fossils, minerals, and a shark jaw.[42] In June 2016, the system featured an exhibition of 80 preserved human body parts by the Tominaga Nakamoto University, a display of 50 sculptures by Nour Kuri representing human bodies, and six photographs by Duilio Rodríguez representing pain.[43][44] In May and June 2018, La Raza station hosted exhibitions by Manuel de la Cera, Norma Patiño, Teresa Olalde, and the Metropolitan Autonomous University (UAM)'s LibroFest.[45]

From 21  August to 15 October 2018, the Secretariat of Agriculture and Rural Development (SAGARPA) and the National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity (CONABIO) displayed an exposition in the tunnel on bees and their ecological importance.[46] In 2020, the station temporarily displayed pictures, landscapes, and sculptures created by Swiss artist H. R. Giger.[47]

GalleryEdit

In the middle of the tunnel, a representation of the celestial sphere is depicted with luminous paint
Monstruos de Fin de Milenio mural by Ariosto Otero Reyes
The June 2016 exhibition on the human body displaying the nervous system
Síntomas by Duilio Rodríguez
Landmarks and exhibitions at La Raza

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Afluencia de estación por línea 2019" [Station traffic per line 2019] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2020. Archived from the original on 8 April 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  2. ^ a b c Associated Press (13 July 2017). "Why The Term 'La Raza' Has Complicated Roots In The US". Colorado Public Radio. Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 28 April 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e "La Raza" (in Spanish). Sistema de Transporte Colectivo. Archived from the original on 17 February 2020. Retrieved 20 August 2011.
  4. ^ Delgado, Diana (4 June 2016). "Informales se instalan otra vez en paradero de La Raza" [Informal workers settling back in La Raza bus terminal]. El Universal (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 19 June 2020. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  5. ^ "Metrobús - Ciudad de México: Ficha técnicas" [Metrobús – Mexico City: Data sheet] (in Spanish). Mexico City Metrobús. Archived from the original on 7 August 2011. Retrieved 20 August 2011.
  6. ^ "Línea 3, Ciudad de México" [Line 3, Mexico City] (in Spanish). iNGENET Infraestructura. 20 July 2009. Archived from the original on 10 September 2014. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  7. ^ a b Transporte: Seis años de esfuerzo conjunto (in Spanish). I. Government of the Federal District Department. 1987. p. 17.
  8. ^ "Línea 5, Ciudad de México" [Line 5, Mexico City] (in Spanish). iNGENET Infraestructura. 20 July 2009. Archived from the original on 2 September 2014. Retrieved 15 April 2020.
  9. ^ "La Raza Metro Station (Línea 3) (Mexico City, 1978)". Structurae.net. Archived from the original on 18 June 2020. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  10. ^ "La Raza Metro Station (Línea 5) (Mexico City, 1982)". Structurae.net. Archived from the original on 18 June 2020. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  11. ^ a b c Gamez Rojas, Marlen (2010). "Análisis de riesgos de incendio en el Sistema de Transporte Colectivo Metro" [Analysis of fire risks in the Sistema de Transporte Colectivo Metro] (PDF) (in Spanish). Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica. Instituto Politécnico Nacional. p. 27. Archived (PDF) from the original on 23 November 2020.
  12. ^ Mora, Karla (10 July 2019). "Por mantenimiento, cerrarán 4 estaciones de la Línea 3 del Metro" [4 metro stations on Line 3 will be closed for maintenance]. La Razón (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 11 July 2019. Retrieved 23 November 2020.
  13. ^ "Transbordos en el Metro ¿una opción para ejercitarte?" [Metro transfers, a workout option?]. Milenio (in Spanish). 12 January 2018. Archived from the original on 17 January 2019. Retrieved 28 May 2020.
  14. ^ Díaz, Omar (22 January 2018). "Conoce los 10 transbordos más largos del Metro" [Check out the 10 longest metro transfers]. Publimetro (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 28 May 2020.
  15. ^ "Estación La Raza del STC Metro" [Mexico City Metro's La Raza Station] (in Spanish). Secretariat of Culture. Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 25 June 2020.
  16. ^ a b c d e "UNAM remodelará Museo Túnel de la Ciencia en el Metro de CDMX" [UNAM will remodel the Tunnel of Science Museum in the Mexico City Metro]. Matutino Express (in Spanish). Televisa. 10 November 2018. Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  17. ^ "Marzo 28 08" [March 28 08]. Mexico City Official Journal (in Spanish). 28 March 2008. p. 1. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 August 2020. Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  18. ^ Pérez Courtade, Luis (5 August 2016). "Inauguran biciestacionamiento en el Metro La Raza" [Bicycle parking inaugurated at La Raza metro station]. Excélsior (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 8 July 2017. Retrieved 25 June 2020.
  19. ^ Notimex (20 September 2019). "Hay tragedias en el Metro que no se olvidan" [There are tragedies in the Metro that are not forgotten]. Excélsior (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 7 December 2019. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  20. ^ a b "¡Accidentes y balaceras! Estos son los momentos de pánico que se han vivido en el Metro" [Accidents and shootings! These are the moments of panic that have been experienced in the Metro] (in Spanish). Grupo Fórmula. 11 March 2020. Archived from the original on 12 March 2020. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  21. ^ "Le dan 50 años" [Sentenced to 50 years] (in Spanish). vLex.com. 28 April 1998. Archived from the original on 8 May 2020. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  22. ^ Nájar, Alberto (10 May 1998). "Todo el Metro" [All about the Metro]. La Jornada (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 5 June 2020. Retrieved 5 June 2020.
  23. ^ "Metro de la CDMX: cinco tragedias que han ocurrido en sus instalaciones" [Mexico City Metro: five tragedies that have occurred in the facilities] (in Spanish). Uno TV. 11 March 2020. Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  24. ^ a b c d "Afluencia de estación por línea 2018" [Station traffic per line 2018] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2019. Archived from the original on 6 June 2019. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  25. ^ a b "Afluencia de estación por línea 2017" [Station traffic per line 2017] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2019. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  26. ^ a b "Afluencia de estación por línea 2016" [Station traffic per line 2016] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2017. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  27. ^ a b "Afluencia de estación por línea 2015" [Station traffic per line 2015] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2016. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  28. ^ a b "Afluencia de estación por línea 2014" [Station traffic per line 2014] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2015. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  29. ^ a b "Afluencia de estación por línea 2013" [Station traffic per line 2013] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2014. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  30. ^ a b "Afluencia de estación por línea 2012" [Station traffic per line 2012] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2013. Archived from the original on 3 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  31. ^ a b "Afluencia de estación por línea 2011" [Station traffic per line 2011] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2012. Archived from the original on 7 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  32. ^ a b "Afluencia de estación por línea 2010" [Station traffic per line 2010] (in Spanish). Sistema Transporte Colectivo Metro. 2011. Archived from the original on 7 May 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  33. ^ Projexity (26 May 2015). "Your Infrastructure Needs a Makeover, Here are 3 ways to make it happen". A Medium Corporation. Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  34. ^ Janzen, Rebecca (2015). "Conclusion: Crowds on Mexico City's Subway: The Ultimate Challenge". The National Body in Mexican Literature: Collective Challenges to Biopolitical Control. Meagher. p. 159. doi:10.1057/9781137543011_6. ISBN 978-1-137-54301-1.
  35. ^ Cocking, Lauren (24 May 2017). "A Brief History of the Mexico City Metro". Culture Trip. Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  36. ^ a b c Notimex (27 December 2015). "En el Metro de México, el museo más visitado del mundo" [Inside Mexico City Metro, the most visited museum in the world]. El Economista (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  37. ^ López, Jonás (30 November 2019). "Cumple 31 años el Túnel de la Ciencia" [The Tunnel of Science turns 31]. Excélsior (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  38. ^ "Túnel de la Ciencia en el metro La Raza" [The Tunnel of Science at La Raza metro station]. Dónde Ir (in Spanish). GIN Media. September 2019. Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  39. ^ "Things to See in Mexico City". Frommer's. Archived from the original on 27 April 2019. Retrieved 29 May 2020.
  40. ^ Notimex (25 November 2008). "Llega a la estación La Raza mural de Ariosto Otero" [Arrives to La Raza station mural of Ariosto Otero]. El Universal. Mexico City. Archived from the original on 21 June 2020. Retrieved 19 June 2020.
  41. ^ "Fotogalería: Exhiben cerebros en Metro La Raza" [Photo Gallery: Brains on display at La Raza metro station]. Excélsior (in Spanish). Mexico City. 10 June 2015. Archived from the original on 29 December 2015. Retrieved 26 June 2020.
  42. ^ Ahumada, Dulce (11 April 2016). "Fósiles y dinosaurios llegan al Metro La Raza" [Fossils and dinosaurs arrive to La Raza metro station] (in Spanish). máspormás. Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 25 June 2020.
  43. ^ Notimex (10 June 2016). "En el Metro La Raza, una muestra de partes humanas" [At La Raza station, a sampling of human parts]. El Economista (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 25 June 2020.
  44. ^ Tijerino, René (23 June 2016). "La exposición Transbordo, en la estación La Raza. Iniciativa del Palacio de la Escuela de Medicina" [The Transbordo exhibition, at La Raza station. Medical School Palace initiative]. Gaceta UNAM (in Spanish). National Autonomous University of Mexico. Archived from the original on 26 June 2020. Retrieved 25 June 2020.
  45. ^ "El Metro La Raza escenario para cuatro exposiciones del LibroFest Metropolitano 2018" [La Raza metro station stage for four exhibitions of the Metropolitan BookFest 2018] (in Spanish). Radio Expresión México. 19 May 2018. Archived from the original on 1 July 2020. Retrieved 25 June 2020.
  46. ^ "Abejas en el Metro La Raza" [Bees at La Raza metro station] (in Spanish). Federal government of Mexico. 21 August 2018. Archived from the original on 27 June 2020. Retrieved 25 June 2020.
  47. ^ Notimex (25 January 2020). "Exponen obras de H. R. Giger en el Metro La Raza" [H. R. Giger's works on display at La Raza metro station]. El Universal (in Spanish). Mexico City. Archived from the original on 24 May 2020. Retrieved 25 June 2020.

External linksEdit