L'Égyptienne (magazine)

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L'Égyptienne was a French language monthly women's magazine published in Egypt from 1925 to 1940. It was one of the earliest women's magazines and feminist periodicals in the country.

L'Égyptienne
EditorCeza Nabarawi
CategoriesWomen's magazine
FrequencyMonthly
PublisherEgyptian Feminist Union
First issueFebruary 1925
Final issue1940
CountryEgypt
Based inCairo
LanguageFrench

History and profileEdit

L'Égyptienne was established by Huda Shaarawi in February 1925.[1][2][3] Its editor was Ceza or Saiza Nabarawi.[4][5] The Egyptian Feminist Union, founded in Cairo by Huda Shaarawi in March 1923, was the publisher.[1][6][7] L'Égyptienne was one of two magazines published by the Union.[8]

The logo of L'Égyptienne featured a woman removing her veil.[9] The magazine covered topics from a feminist and Egyptian nationalist angle[4] and was also distributed abroad.[3]

L'Égyptienne was published monthly[3][9] and targeted upper class Egyptian women who were educated at French schools or in France.[4][6] It also addressed international feminist circles.[9] Egyptian feminist Doria Shafik was among the contributors to the magazine.[10]

The magazine ceased publication in 1940 when World War II began.[11][12][13]

See alsoEdit

List of magazines in Egypt

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Earl L. Sullivan (1 January 1986). Women in Egyptian Public Life. Syracuse University Press. p. 172. ISBN 978-0-8156-2354-0. Retrieved 6 October 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "This day in History: women's rights pioneer Huda Shaarawy died in 1947". Al Masry Al Youm. 12 December 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ a b c Sonia Aly Dabbous (October 2002). "Women in the Media Past - Present - Future..." Ayamm. Archived from the original on 11 August 2014. Retrieved 6 October 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ a b c Werner Ende; Udo Steinbach (15 April 2010). Islam in the World Today: A Handbook of Politics, Religion, Culture, and Society. Cornell University Press. p. 640. ISBN 978-0-8014-6489-8.
  5. ^ Margot Badran (30 December 1999). "Feminism in a nationalist century". Al Ahram Weekly (462). Archived from the original on 19 April 2010. Retrieved 6 October 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ a b Warren I. Cohen (2009). Profiles in Humanity: The Battle for Peace, Freedom, Equality, and Human Rights. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 78. ISBN 978-0-7425-6702-3. Retrieved 6 October 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Marilyn Booth (May 2001). "Woman in Islam". International Journal of Middle East Studies. 23 (2): 171–201. JSTOR 259561.
  8. ^ Marilyn Booth (2004). "Egyptian Feminist Union". Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa. Retrieved 6 October 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ a b c Ghada Hashem Talhami (2013). Historical Dictionary of Women in the Middle East and North Africa. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 357. ISBN 978-0-8108-6858-8. Retrieved 6 October 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ Cynthia Nelson (Fall 1986). "The Voices of Doria Shafik: Feminist Consciousness in Egypt, 1940-1960". Feminist Issues. 6 (2): 15–31. doi:10.1007/BF02685640.
  11. ^ Cynthia Nelson (1 January 1996). Doria Shafik Egyptian Feminist: A Woman apart. American University in Cairo Press. p. 127. ISBN 978-977-424-413-1. Retrieved 6 October 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "Chronology of Major Events 1873-1994". Mediterranean Women. Retrieved 6 October 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ Sania Sharawi Lanfranchi (18 December 2011). Casting Off the Veil: The Life of Huda Shaarawi, Egypt's First Feminist. I.B.Tauris. p. 274. ISBN 978-0-85772-071-9. Retrieved 6 October 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External linksEdit