Kyū-Furukawa Gardens

Kyū-Furukawa Gardens (旧古河庭園, kyū-furukawa teien) is a Tokyo metropolitan park in Nishigahara, Kita, Tokyo. The park includes a Western-style mansion, a Western-style rose garden, and a Japanese-style garden, all of which were built in early 20th century.

Kyū-Furukawa Gardens
Kyu-Furukawa Tei (House)2.jpg
Mansion in the gardens
LocationKita, Tokyo, Japan
Coordinates35°44′33″N 139°44′46″E / 35.742557°N 139.746159°E / 35.742557; 139.746159
Area30,780.86 square metres (331,322.4 sq ft)
Created30 April 1956
The outside of the mansion that can be found in the gardens.

OutlineEdit

Several scenes from inside the park, 2012

The gardens were built by Baron Toranosuke Furukawa.[1] The Western-style mansion and garden were designed by English architect Josiah Conder[2] and were completed by 1917.[3] Conder was called the "father of Japanese modern architecture"[4] and also designed Rokumeikan, Kyu-Iwasaki-tei Garden, and Holy Resurrection Cathedral. The Japanese garden was designed by Ogawa Jihei VII[5] and was completed in 1919.[citation needed]

Baron Furukawa was the owner of Furukawa zaibatu which owned Ashio copper mine.[citation needed]

Western building and gardenEdit

 
The rose garden is built on a slope and has a geometric structure.

The exterior of the building and the ground floor rooms are designed in the Western style, but the second floor rooms are mostly in Japanese style with tatami mats.[6] The mansion is built on a steep slope of Musashino Terrace. The building is located on the top of a hill, with the Western-style garden on the slope, and Japanese garden on the bottom.[7] The western garden is a complex of Italian style and geometric French style rose garden. On the bottom of the western garden is a Rhododendron plantation which harmonises the western geometric garden and non-geometric Japanese garden.

Japanese gardenEdit

 
The Japanese garden, the pond. A Tōrō on the left.

The Japanese garden is surrounded by a deep forest. The Western building and garden are hidden by tall trees. In the centre of the stroll garden is an artificial pond called "Shinji-ike" ("Heart letter pond"). The pond's shoreline is designed in the shape of the Kanji "心(Shin)", which means "heart". Around the pond are Tōrōs (stone lanterns), artificial hills, water falls, islands, and a tea ceremony house.[8] The park in its current state was opened to the public in 1956.[9]

AccessEdit

General admission is ¥150. The park is open daily until 5 PM.[10] It is a quick walk from Kami-Nakazato Station on the JR Keihin-Tōhoku Line or Nishigahara Station on the Tokyo Metro Nanboku Line.[11]

Popular CultureEdit

The garden guesthouse features in the popular series Umineko When They Cry.[citation needed]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Spring Rose Festival at the Kyu-Furukawa Gardens". Tokyo Creative. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  2. ^ "Kyu-Furukawa Gardens". Tokyo Metropolitan Park Assocation. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  3. ^ "Spring Rose Festival at the Kyu-Furukawa Gardens". Tokyo Creative. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  4. ^ Watanabe, Toshio (2006). "Japanese Imperial Architecture". In Ellen P, Conant (ed.). Challenging Past And Present: The Metamorphosis of Nineteenth-Century Japanese Art. University of Hawaii Press.
  5. ^ "Kyu-Furukawa Gardens". Tokyo Metropolitan Park Assocation. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  6. ^ "Spring Rose Festival at the Kyu-Furukawa Gardens". Tokyo Creative. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  7. ^ "Kyu-Furukawa Gardens". Tokyo Metropolitan Park Assocation. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  8. ^ "Harmony of western garden and Japanese garden". Archived from the original on 7 April 2006. Retrieved 4 September 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "Kyu-Furukawa Gardens". Tokyo Metropolitan Park Assocation. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  10. ^ "Kyu-Furukawa Gardens". Tokyo Metropolitan Park Assocation. Retrieved 4 May 2021.
  11. ^ "Kyu-Furukawa Gardens". Tokyo Metropolitan Park Assocation. Retrieved 4 May 2021.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 35°44′34.7″N 139°44′48.1″E / 35.742972°N 139.746694°E / 35.742972; 139.746694