Kronprinsessegade 36 is a Neoclassical property overlooking Rosenborg Castle Garden in central Copenhagen, Denmark. A plaque embedded in the wall between the first and second floor commemorates that the composer Christoph Ernst Friedrich Weyse lived in the building from 1825 to 1842.

Kronprinsessegade 36
Map
General information
LocationCopenhagen
CountryDenmark
Coordinates55°41′4.62″N 12°34′57.23″E / 55.6846167°N 12.5825639°E / 55.6846167; 12.5825639
Construction started1820
Completed1825
Design and construction
Architect(s)Thomas Blom

History

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Blom family

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Kronprinsessegade seen on a print with a text that commemorates that Weyse lived in the building from 1825

The site was part of a large piece of land acquired by Bloms Enke & Co. The property now known as Kronprinsessegade 36 was listed in the new cadastre of 1806 as No. 399 in St. Ann's West Quarter. A building had still not been constructed on the site when the firm was dissolved. The site was subsequently acquired by Thomas Blom. The present building on the site was built by him in 1820–1825. Blom had until then lived with his family at Kronprinsessegade 40. They moved to one of the apartments in the new building as soon as it was completed in 1825. Blom's son Julius Blom would later become a prominent master carpenter.

Thomas Blom resided on the ground floor at the time of the 1934 census.[1] Christen Petersen Estrup, a groce (høker), resided in the basement with his wife Christine Petersen Estrup and their 10-year-old daughter.[2]

Thomas Blom lived on the ground floor of the building at the 1840 census. He lived there with his wife J. C. Carstensen, their five children (aged 20 to 26), two male servants and two maids.[3] Charlotte Elisabeth Colsmann, widow of professor Johannes Colsmann (1771-1830), resided on the first floor with two sons (aged 22 and 26), 43-year-old Dicte Fredericke Preussen (teacher), one male servant and one maid.[4] Lars Peter Larsen, a man with unknown profession, resided in the basement with his wife Christiane Larsen (née Brodersen), their five children (aged seven to 17), his mother-inlaw Ane Petersen /widow) and one maid.[5]

The second floor apartment was let out to the composer and organist Christoph Ernst Friedrich Weyse. He had lived at Kronprinsessegade 8 since 1915. He lived there with his housekeeper Karen and changing students and lodgers. Weuse lived in the apartment until his death in 1842.

Thomas Blom lived in the building until his death in 1841. It was sold by his widow in 1845.

The mathematician and politician Carl Christoffer Georg Andræ lived in the building from 1843 to 1846.

Sponneck

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The new owner of the building was Count Wilhelm Sponneck, a jurist. His property was home to four households at the 1845 census. The owner, who was a member (deputeret) of Generaltoldkammeret and Kommercekollegiet, resided on the first floor with his wife Antoinette Siegfriede Sponneck (née Lozow), their twosons, his brother Carl Waldemar Greve Sponneck, a male servantand a chamber maid.[6] Christine Stampe (née Dalgas), resided on the second flor with a male servant and a maid.[7] Catherine Carstensen, for some reason listed as "sister-in-law" (probably of Johan Arnold Hieronymus Carstensen), resided on the ground floor with Gustav Hugh Carstensen, one male servant and two maids.[8] Ane Maria Dohne resided in the basement with six children and a maid.[9]

Sponneck was appointed to Minister of Financial Affairs in 1849.

Agent and landowner Nicolaj Nyholm and his wife Mathilde Cathrine Erasmine Nyholm (née Ammitzbøll) resided in the ground-floor apartment at the 1850 census.[10] Sponneck lived in the building from 1845 to 1863. Rgeir daughter Mathilde Nikoline Nyholm (1834-1894) was later married to Carl Valdemar Sponneck.

Later history

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C. D. Fenger's living room at No. 36.

Carl Emil Fenger (1814-1884), who served as Minister of Financial Affairs from May 1870 tto March 1872, lived in the building from 1870.[11]

Architecture

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The building consists of three storeys over a high cellar. The roof is a Mansard roof with a two-bay wall dormer flanked by two dormers. A cornice supported by brackets runs under the roof.

A side wing extends from the rear side of the building. A four-storey warehouse is located at the bottom of the courtyard.

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References

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  1. ^ "Folketælling - 1834 - Thomas Blom". Danishfamilysearch.dk (in Danish). Retrieved 15 September 2023.
  2. ^ "Folketælling - 1834 - Christen Petersen Estrup". Danishfamilysearch.dk (in Danish). Retrieved 15 September 2023.
  3. ^ "Folketælling - 1840 - Thomas Blom". Danishfamilysearch.dk (in Danish). Retrieved 15 September 2023.
  4. ^ "Folketælling - 1840 - Charlotte Elisabeth Colsmann". Danishfamilysearch.dk (in Danish). Retrieved 15 September 2023.
  5. ^ "Folketælling - 1840 - Lars Peter Larsen". Danishfamilysearch.dk (in Danish). Retrieved 15 September 2023.
  6. ^ "Folketælling - 1840 - Kronprinsessegade 399,1.Sal". Danishfamilysearch.dk (in Danish). Retrieved 15 September 2023.
  7. ^ "Folketælling - 1845 - Kronprinsessegade 399,2.Sahl". Danishfamilysearch.dk (in Danish). Retrieved 15 September 2023.
  8. ^ "Folketælling - 1845 - Kronprinsessegade 399,Stuenl". Danishfamilysearch.dk (in Danish). Retrieved 15 September 2023.
  9. ^ "Folketælling 1845: Kronprinsessegade 399, Kjelderen". Danishfamilysearch.dk (in Danish). Retrieved 15 September 2023.
  10. ^ "Grevinde Mathilde Nikoline Nyholm". olhus.dk (in Danish). Retrieved 16 June 2022.
  11. ^ "Kronprinsessegade 36". indenforvoldene.dk (in Danish). Retrieved 5 August 2018.
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