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Kjetil André Rekdal (born 6 November 1968) is a Norwegian football manager and a former footballer.[2]

Kjetil Rekdal
Kjetil Rekdal 2006-06-06.jpg
Personal information
Full name Kjetil André Rekdal
Date of birth (1968-11-06) 6 November 1968 (age 50)
Place of birth Molde, Norway[1]
Height 1.87 m (6 ft 2 in)[1]
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
1979–1985 Fiksdal/Rekdal
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1985–1988 Molde 75 (25)
1988–1990 Borussia Mönchengladbach 9 (0)
1990–1996 Lierse 181 (71)
1994Molde (loan) 8 (4)
1996–1997 Rennes 31 (2)
1997–2000 Hertha BSC 64 (4)
2000–2004 Vålerenga 116 (21)
Total 484 (127)
National team
1987–2000 Norway 83 (17)
Teams managed
2001–2006 Vålerenga
2006–2007 Lierse
2007–2008 1. FC Kaiserslautern
2008–2012 Aalesund
2013–2016 Vålerenga
2018–2019 Start
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Rekdal began his playing career in Molde FK, playing afterwards for clubs in the German Bundesliga, French Ligue 1 and Belgian Belgian Pro League. Playing as a midfielder during his time as a player, his 83 caps with the Norway national football team makes him the seventh most capped player in the team's history.[3]

Rekdal previously managed Vålerenga from 2000 to 2006, during which he won both the cup and league title. He has also been in charge of Kaiserslautern, Lierse and Aalesund.[4] During his time at Aalesund, the club earned two cup titles and saw a period of success previously unmatched in their history, which was attributed to Rekdal.

Contents

Club careerEdit

Born in Molde, Rekdal started playing football for the local club Fiksdal/Rekdal in 1979, later as a 16-year-old he would start his professional career with the local top flight club Molde FK, becoming the second-youngest player in the league. In 1988, he signed with the Bundesliga club Borussia Mönchengladbach and stayed with them for two years before moving to the Belgian Pro League side Lierse S.K. and remaining there until 1996, with the exception of the 1994 season which he spent on loan helping his former club Molde FK gaining promotion to Tippeligaen and winning the domestic Cup.

In 1996, he signed for Ligue 1 club Rennes. The highlight of his playing career was a highly successful spell at Hertha BSC in Germany between 1997 and 2000. His final years as a player and then player/manager was spent in Norwegian club Vålerenga, where he picked up another cup winner's medal in 2002 before retiring in 2004. In the summer of 2007, Rekdal officially rejoined his youth club Fiksdal/Rekdal.[4]

International careerEdit

Rekdal has 83 games for the Norway national football team, after his debut against Italy in 1987, and played in two FIFA World Cups (1994 and 1998). He scored 17 goals for the national team, among those one legendary long range goal at Wembley against England in 1992, the only goal in the game as Norway beat Mexico in the 1994 World Cup, and a penalty in the 1998 World Cup against Brazil to win the game 2–1, prompting the commentator to say how "the man with the yellow boots has hurt those wearing the yellow shirts...Delight for Egil Olsen".[2] The two World Cup goals make him the highest scoring Norwegian in World Cup history, with one goal more than Arne Brustad, Dan Eggen, Håvard Flo and Tore André Flo.[5]

Coaching careerEdit

VålerengaEdit

Rekdal has proven himself a successful coach, leading Vålerenga from relegation in 2001, and famously weeping as his team avoided relegation the following year[6] and back into position as one of the dominating clubs in the Tippeligaen. In 2004, he led the team to second place, losing the first place on goal difference to Rosenborg, and in 2005, his team finally won the league for the first time in 21 years, ending Rosenborg's 13-year reign as champions of Norway.[7] along the way receiving legend-status in the club, partly due to the fact that he refused an offer of a six-digit coaching salary in order to help the club financially.[8]

LierseEdit

Rekdal resigned as coach at Vålerenga on 21 August 2006, following a string of poor results. He was appointed manager of his former club Lierse on 21 November 2006. When he arrived at the club, Lierse lay bottom of the table with only two points in fifteen matches. At the end of the season, they ended up with 26 points and avoided direct relegation. In the play-offs, Lierse only managed to win three of their six matches and were relegated to the Second Division after all.[9]

1. FC KaiserslauternEdit

In May 2007, Rekdal signed on to manage Kaiserslautern in the German 2. Bundesliga. He left the club in early February of the following year, the club lying in sixteenth place.[4][10]

AalesundEdit

He joined forces with Norwegian top flight outfit Aalesund in 2008 after moving back to Norway.[11] Joining the club mid-season, he found Aalesund lying in a relegation spot, but managed to get a relegation play-off spot, where Aalesund beat challengers Sogndal 7–2 on aggregate, thereby securing a new season in the Tippeligaen. In 2009, he led Aalesund to the club's first victory in the Norwegian Cup, where they beat arch rivals Molde 3–2 after a penalty shootout in the final.[12] In 2010, he led the club to the fourth place in Tippeligaen, the club's best result ever.[13] In 2011, he received wide praise when his club came close to the historic feat of qualifying for the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League, losing the last play-off game to the Dutch side AZ Alkmaar, having won the first leg 2–1.[14] The same year he again led Aalesund to win the Norwegian Cup Final, thereby securing a UEFA Europa League qualification spot for the third consecutive year.[15] His contract with Aalesund was terminated on 26 November 2012.[16] After he won his second Norwegian Cup with Aalesund in three years, he was once again said to take over as national team coach after Drillo.[17]

On 26 November 2012, the board of directors of Aalesund announced the termination of Rekdal's contract.[16] The board stressed that it was not due to the season results, but rather as a result of a general review.[18] Analysts noted that the sacking was likely a result of a power struggle within the club between Rekdal, the sports director and the chairman of the board.[19]

Return to VålerengaEdit

Rekdal started his second tenure for Vålerenga, when he was appointed as head coach on 8 January 2013.[20]

On 13 July 2016, it was announced he would end his tenure as head coach of Valerenga after the 2016 season and will move into the position as sporting director to make way for Ronny Deila whom will take over as head coach. [21]

StartEdit

Rekdal was appointed as head coach on 1 June 2018 after former head coach Mark Dempsey was sacked on 18 May 2018. Rekdal signed a two-year contract with Start.

Personal lifeEdit

Born 6 November in Rekdal in Vestnes, into a family of six, including three younger siblings, his younger brother Sindre played also professional with Molde FK helping them win the domestic cup in 1994.[22] Among his interests and hobbies is freshwater fishing and card-games such as Poker, having competed in amateur tournaments internationally.[4][23][24]

Rekdal moved to Ottestad neighborhood in Hamar in 2013, with his wife and four children.[25]

During his time at Lierse, Rekdal had a clause in his contract which allowed him to keep up to date with Leeds United results at half-time intervals, via BBC Radio. He is a fanatic supporter of the Yorkshire club.[24]

As with most coaches, Rekdal is highly superstitious. To avoid bad luck, he never appears on matchday without his locally produced trademark Pear-flavored soft drink.[26]

Upon joining Aalesunds FK as coach, he also joined the tier five club Fiksdal/Rekdal as player and played regularly at their home matches, he stated that he wished to contribute to the club with which he started his career.[4][27]

Career statisticsEdit

ManagerialEdit

Year Team Pos Pl W D L GD +/- Pts Cup Notes
2001 Vålerenga IF 1st 30 19 8 3 71–29 +42 65/90 Qtr Final Promoted to Tippeligaen.
2002 Vålerenga IF 8th 26 7 12 7 38–31 +7 33/78 Winner
2003 Vålerenga IF 12th 26 7 7 12 30–33 −3 28/78 Qtr Final UEFA Cup 3rd Round.
2004 Vålerenga IF 2nd 26 13 9 4 40–22 +18 48/78 3rd Round Lost out on the Championship by the smallest margin.
2005 Vålerenga IF 1st 26 13 7 6 40–27 +13 46/78 Semi Final UEFA Cup 1st Round.
2006 Vålerenga IF 17 6 4 7 23–22 +1 22/51 Qtr Final Resigned after 17 rounds.
2006–07 Lierse S.K. 17th 34 6 8 20 33–66 −33 26/102 Round 7 Relegated to Belgian Second Division.
2007–08 1. FC Kaiserslautern 19 3 7 9 19–24 −5 16/57 2nd Round Sacked after 19 rounds.
2008 Aalesunds FK 13th 26 7 4 15 29–42 −13 25/78 Escaped relegation through winning playoff.
2009 Aalesunds FK 13th 30 9 9 12 34–43 −9 36/90 Winner
2010 Aalesunds FK 4th 30 14 5 11 46–37 +9 47/90 3rd Round Europa League 3rd Qual. Round
2011 Aalesunds FK 9th 30 12 7 11 36–38 −2 43/90 Winner Europa League Play-Off.
2012 Aalesunds FK 11th 30 9 11 10 40–41 −1 38/90 4th Round Europa League 3rd Qual. Round, sacked after season ended.
2013 Vålerenga IF 11th 30 10 6 14 41-50 -9 36/90 Qtr Final
2014 Vålerenga IF 6th 30 11 9 10 59-53 +6 42/90 4th Round
2015 Vålerenga IF 7th 30 14 7 8 49-41 +8 49/90 2nd Round
2016 Vålerenga IF 10th 30 10 8 12 41-39 +3 38/90 Quarter-final

International goalsEdit

Scores and results list Norway's goal tally first.[28][29]
No Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 9 September 1992 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo, Norway   San Marino 1–0 10–0 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification
2. 10–0
3. 23 September 1992 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo, Norway   Netherlands 1–0 2–1 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification
4. 14 October 1992 Wembley Stadium, London, England   England 1–1 1–1 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification
5. 28 April 1993 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo, Norway   Turkey 1–0 3–1 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification
6. 19 June 1994 RFK Stadium, Washington, D.C., United States   Mexico 1–0 1–0 1994 FIFA World Cup
7. 12 October 1994 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo, Norway   Netherlands 1–1 1–1 UEFA Euro 1996 qualification
8. 16 November 1994 Dinamo Stadium, Minsk, Belarus   Belarus 4–0 4–0 UEFA Euro 1994 qualification
9. 26 April 1995 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo, Norway   Luxembourg 5–0 5–0 UEFA Euro 1996 qualification
10. 25 May 1995 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo, Norway   Ghana 1–0 3–2 Friendly
11. 9 October 1996 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo, Norway   Hungary 1–0 3–0 1998 FIFA World Cup qualification
12. 2–0
13. 3–0
14. 27 May 1998 Molde Stadion, Molde, Norway   Saudi Arabia 1–0 6–0 Friendly
15. 23 June 1998 Stade Vélodrome, Marseille, France   Brazil 2–1 2–1 1998 FIFA World Cup
16. 10 October 1998 Bežigrad Stadium, Ljubljana, Slovenia   Slovenia 2–1 2–1 UEFA Euro 2000 qualification
17. 14 October 1998 Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo, Norway   Albania 2–2 2–2 UEFA Euro 2000 qualification

HonoursEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Kjetil Rekdal". worldfootball.net. Archived from the original on 16 January 2019. Retrieved 16 January 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Kjetil Rekdal". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Archived from the original on 23 October 2012. Retrieved 29 May 2009.
  3. ^ Søfting, Thomas (13 December 2012). "Norway - Record International Players". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 4 May 2013. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  4. ^ a b c d e Valle, Viggo (28 January 2010). "Kjetil Rekdal – Stjerneklart" (in Norwegian). Nrk.no. Archived from the original on 14 April 2010. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  5. ^ "VM i Fotball – Statistikk – Fakta" (in Norwegian). Fotballen.eu. Archived from the original on 7 October 2011. Retrieved 5 October 2011. Flest VM-Mål Kjetil Rekdal (2)
  6. ^ Andresen, Gorm (21 November 2005). "Klanen ber VIF-direktør ta pause" (in Norwegian). dagbladet.no. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  7. ^ Andresen, Gorm (29 October 2005). "Vålerenga er seriemestere" (in Norwegian). dagbladet.no. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  8. ^ Stokstad, Morten (7 November 2003). "Rekdal gir milioner til VIF" (in Norwegian). vg.no. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  9. ^ "Håpet ute for Rekdal" (in Norwegian). Vg.no. 10 June 2007. Archived from the original on 3 February 2014. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  10. ^ "Fuchs: Entscheidung bis Dienstag" (in German). kicker.de. 10 February 2008. Archived from the original on 9 January 2016. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  11. ^ Bakke, Pål; Johannessen, Sturla (4 September 2008). "Rekdal overtar Aalesund" (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 10 October 2012. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  12. ^ Borge, Andreeas (8 November 2009). "Rekdal: Coaching i Verdensklasse" (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 10 October 2012. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  13. ^ Stenerud, Kristian (13 May 2011). "Aafk får kvalikkplass" (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  14. ^ "Rekdal chasing historic Aalesund achievement". UEFA.com. 22 August 2011. Archived from the original on 19 July 2012. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  15. ^ Wegard Bakkehaug; Einar Orten; Jamel Rake; Øyvind Brenne; Knut Arne Hansen (6 November 2011). "Mange var preget av stundens alvor". Verdens Gang (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 4 January 2014. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  16. ^ a b Stendal, Christian Skare; Priesner, Jakob (26 November 2012). "Kjetil Rekdal fikk sparken i Aalesund". Aftenposten (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 30 December 2012. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  17. ^ Opsahl, Per (7 November 2011). "Mener Rekdal er perfekt for landslaget". Verdens Gang (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 10 December 2011. Retrieved 23 December 2011.
  18. ^ Evensen, Marius (27 November 2012). "Styreleder i Aafk: – En trist slutt, men det var nødvendig". tv2.no (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 29 November 2012. Retrieved 27 November 2012.
  19. ^ Skuseth, Helge (27 November 2012). "Det måtte ende slik". Sunnmørsposten (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 22 February 2013. Retrieved 27 November 2012.
  20. ^ Marius Vik; Per Opsahl; Lillian Holden (8 January 2013). "Rekdal ansatt som Vålerenga-trener: - Veldig glad" (in Norwegian). vg.no. Archived from the original on 15 March 2013. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  21. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 14 July 2016. Retrieved 22 August 2016.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  22. ^ "Om gledescener of første cupgull" (in Norwegian). Moldefk.no. Retrieved 5 October 2011. Gutta som tok Moldes første kongepokal: Morten Bakke, Trond Strande, Flaco, Sindre Rekdal et. al.[dead link]
  23. ^ "Rekdal og Aarøy får pokerkritikk" (in Norwegian). fotball.bt.no. 25 November 2010. Archived from the original on 16 July 2012. Retrieved 22 April 2013. Aalesund-trener Kjetil Rekdal skal sammen med spiss Tor Hogne Aarøy til Malta for å delta i en pokerturnering.
  24. ^ a b Kvatningen, Roy (1 October 2011). "KJETIL REKDAL – Jeg er en av få i verden" (in Norwegian). Nettavisen.no. Archived from the original on 13 June 2013. Retrieved 22 April 2013. Vi møttes alltid klokka fire til mat, og kampene i Belgia går klokka åtte. Jeg satt med radio under middagen. Det fikk jeg lov til, smiler den 42 år gamle Leeds-fanatikeren
  25. ^ Flygind, Kjetil (10 February 2013). "Rekdal flytter til Hamar". aftenposten.no. Archived from the original on 12 February 2013. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  26. ^ Vågnes, Stig (16 May 2011). "Smaken av Rekdal-seier". Aftenposten.no (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  27. ^ Nesset Hjelvik, Eirik (20 May 2010). "Bare seier er godt nok". Aftenposten.no (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 22 April 2013.
  28. ^ "Kjetil Rekdal - International Matches". rsssf. Archived from the original on 4 January 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  29. ^ "Kjetil Rekdal". Soccer-DB. Retrieved 25 May 2017.[permanent dead link]

External linksEdit