Kitchener bun

The Kitchener bun is a type of sweet pastry made and sold in South Australia since 1915.[1] It consists of a bun sometimes baked,[citation needed] sometimes fried, made from a sweet yeasted dough similar to that used for making doughnuts, split and then filled with raspberry or strawberry jam and cream, most often with a dusting of sugar on the top.

Kitchener bun
Kitchener bun.jpg
TypePastry
Place of originAustralia
Region or stateSouth Australia
Main ingredientsDough, raspberry or strawberry jam, cream

The Kitchener bun resembles the Berliner,[2] a pastry of German origin – although distinguished from it by an open face and the use of more cream than jam – and was, in fact, known as such until anti-German sentiment in World War I led to its renaming in honour of the British field marshal Lord Horatio Kitchener.[3]

In a 1930 recipe the jam is sealed into the pastry before deep-frying in fat, and there is no mention of cream[4] until 1934.[5] Ten years later, an Unley Road baker was fined £15 2/ (around $1,000 in today's money) for using cream in his Kitchener buns, contrary to provisions in the National Security Regulations.[6]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The Searchlight". The Critic (Adelaide). South Australia. 24 March 1915. p. 15. Retrieved 17 May 2020 – via Trove.
  2. ^ "A Rose". The Daily Herald (Adelaide). South Australia. 25 October 1916. p. 8. Retrieved 17 May 2020 – via Trove.
  3. ^ Jan O'Connell. "1917 The Berliner becomes the Kitchener Bun". A Timeline of Australian Food. Retrieved 22 March 2019.
  4. ^ "Homecraft". The Mail (Adelaide). South Australia. 1 March 1930. p. 14. Retrieved 17 May 2020 – via Trove.
  5. ^ ""Chronicle " Cooks Exchange Ideas". The Chronicle (Adelaide). South Australia. 27 September 1934. p. 57. Retrieved 17 May 2020 – via Trove.
  6. ^ "Cream In Kitchener Buns". The Advertiser (Adelaide). South Australia. 18 August 1944. p. 3. Retrieved 17 May 2020 – via Trove.

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