Kit Carson County, Colorado

Kit Carson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2020 census, the population was 7,087.[1] The county seat is Burlington.[2] The county was established in 1889 and named for American frontiersman and Indian fighter Kit Carson.[3][4]

Kit Carson County
Burlington State Armory in Burlington, Colorado.
Map of Colorado highlighting Kit Carson County
Location within the U.S. state of Colorado
Map of the United States highlighting Colorado
Colorado's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°19′N 102°36′W / 39.31°N 102.6°W / 39.31; -102.6
Country United States
State Colorado
FoundedApril 11, 1889
Named forKit Carson
SeatBurlington
Largest cityBurlington
Area
 • Total2,162 sq mi (5,600 km2)
 • Land2,161 sq mi (5,600 km2)
 • Water0.9 sq mi (2 km2)  0.04%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2020)
7,087
 • Density3.3/sq mi (1.3/km2)
Time zoneUTC−7 (Mountain)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district4th
Websitekitcarsoncounty.colorado.gov

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 2,162 square miles (5,600 km2), of which 2,161 square miles (5,600 km2) is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km2) (0.04%) is water.[5]

Adjacent countiesEdit

Major highwaysEdit

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
18902,472
19001,580−36.1%
19107,483373.6%
19208,91519.1%
19309,7259.1%
19407,512−22.8%
19508,60014.5%
19606,957−19.1%
19707,5308.2%
19807,5990.9%
19907,140−6.0%
20008,01112.2%
20108,2703.2%
20207,087−14.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2020[1]

At the 2000 census there were 8,011 people, 2,990 households, and 2,081 families living in the county. The population density was 4 people per square mile (1/km2). There were 3,430 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile (1/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 87.28% White, 1.74% Black or African American, 0.51% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 9.20% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. 13.67% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[10] Of the 2,990 households 33.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.40% were married couples living together, 6.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.40% were non-families. 27.20% of households were one person and 12.50% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.07.

The age distribution was 26.70% under the age of 18, 7.50% from 18 to 24, 29.00% from 25 to 44, 22.20% from 45 to 64, and 14.60% 65 or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 112.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 112.10 males.

The median household income was $33,152 and the median family income was $41,867. Males had a median income of $28,700 versus $19,978 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,964. About 9.40% of families and 12.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.60% of those under age 18 and 11.10% of those age 65 or over.

PoliticsEdit

Like all the High Plains, Kit Carson County is powerfully Republican. Since 1920 it has been won only twice by a Democratic presidential candidate – during the landslides of 1932 and 1964. Along with Elbert County and Rio Blanco County, it was one of three Colorado counties to be won by Alf Landon in 1936.

United States presidential election results for Kit Carson County, Colorado[11]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 3,144 81.22% 662 17.10% 65 1.68%
2016 2,967 80.15% 536 14.48% 199 5.38%
2012 2,785 75.23% 838 22.64% 79 2.13%
2008 2,455 71.32% 912 26.50% 75 2.18%
2004 2,721 77.70% 729 20.82% 52 1.48%
2000 2,542 73.51% 809 23.40% 107 3.09%
1996 2,068 60.26% 1,073 31.26% 291 8.48%
1992 1,801 49.23% 925 25.29% 932 25.48%
1988 2,262 64.41% 1,196 34.05% 54 1.54%
1984 2,762 77.06% 778 21.71% 44 1.23%
1980 2,622 71.78% 790 21.63% 241 6.60%
1976 1,888 52.28% 1,647 45.61% 76 2.10%
1972 2,316 70.89% 824 25.22% 127 3.89%
1968 1,977 61.08% 1,026 31.70% 234 7.23%
1964 1,316 40.71% 1,906 58.95% 11 0.34%
1960 2,248 66.88% 1,103 32.82% 10 0.30%
1956 2,243 70.96% 911 28.82% 7 0.22%
1952 2,511 71.03% 998 28.23% 26 0.74%
1948 1,873 58.88% 1,281 40.27% 27 0.85%
1944 2,471 72.27% 937 27.41% 11 0.32%
1940 2,481 68.69% 1,100 30.45% 31 0.86%
1936 1,980 50.76% 1,730 44.35% 191 4.90%
1932 1,835 42.55% 2,289 53.07% 189 4.38%
1928 2,486 67.37% 1,137 30.81% 67 1.82%
1924 2,108 60.21% 720 20.57% 673 19.22%
1920 1,872 65.48% 796 27.84% 191 6.68%
1916 1,030 37.06% 1,571 56.53% 178 6.41%
1912 569 25.08% 719 31.69% 981 43.23%


In other statewide elections, Kit Carson County also leans strongly Republican: no Democratic senatorial candidate has won the county since before 1990. At a gubernatorial level, it has been won by Democrat Roy Romer in 1990[12] – when he carried all but four counties statewide – and by Constitution Party candidate Tom Tancredo in 2010.[13]

RecreationEdit

National historic landmarkEdit

Historic trailEdit

CommunitiesEdit

CityEdit

TownsEdit

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 5, 2021.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer, p. 957
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp. 176.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  11. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 26, 2017.
  12. ^ "1990 Gubernatorial General Election Results – Colorado". Dave Leip’s U.S. Election Atlas.
  13. ^ "2010 Gubernatorial General Election Results – Colorado". Dave Leip’s U.S. Election Atlas.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 39°19′N 102°36′W / 39.31°N 102.60°W / 39.31; -102.60