Kim Yong-sik

Kim Yong-sik (Korean: 김용식; Hanja: 金容植; 25 July 1910 – 8 March 1985) was a South Korean football player and manager. He is esteemed as the godfather of the South Korean football.

Kim Yong-sik
Personal information
Full name Kim Yong-sik
Date of birth (1910-07-25)25 July 1910
Place of birth Sinchon, Hwanghae, Korean Empire
Date of death 8 March 1985(1985-03-08) (aged 74)
Place of death Seoul, South Korea
Height 1.72 m (5 ft 7+12 in)
Position(s) Defensive midfielder
Youth career
Kyungshin High school
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1930–1931 Soongsil College
1932–1937 Bosung College
1937 Waseda University
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1933–1940 Kyungsung FC
1934 Joseon FC
1940–1942 Pyongyang FC
1946–1947 Seoul FC
1946–1950 Joseon Electrical Industry
1950–1952 ROK Army
National team
1936–1940 Japan 3 (0)
1948–1950 South Korea 3 (1)
Teams managed
1953 South Korea
1954 South Korea
1959 South Korea
1960–1961 South Korea
1968–1969 Yangzee
1969 South Korea
1970 Korea Trust Bank
1981–1982 Hallelujah FC
Honours
Men's football
Representing  South Korea (as manager)
AFC Asian Cup
Winner 1960 South Korea Team
*Club domestic league appearances and goals
Kim Yong-sik
Hangul
김용식
Hanja
金容植
Revised RomanizationGim Yong-sik
McCune–ReischauerKim Yong-sik

International careerEdit

Kim played international football for both Japan and South Korea.[1] When Korea was ruled by Japan, Kim was the only Korean footballer to be selected for the Japanese national team for the Summer Olympics.[2] In the first round of the 1936 Summer Olympics against Sweden, he contributed to Japan's victory by assisting the winning goal in the tournament.[3][4][5] After the Olympics, Kim joined Waseda University which had many Japan's national players, but he went back to Korea because of the discrimination about Koreans.

Kim could participate in the Olympics as a Korean player after the end of the Japanese forced occupation. He achieved the first-ever victory of South Korean football against Mexico as a player-coach in the 1948 Summer Olympics.[6] After his retirement, he managed South Korea in the 1954 FIFA World Cup and the 1960 AFC Asian Cup.[6][7]

Style of playEdit

Kim had fast pace, elaborate techniques, and high workrate which most footballers need. Japan also couldn't ignore his abilities, selecting him for the Japanese national team.[4] He played as a centre-half, but he was a playmaker who took part in the attack.[3][4]

Personal lifeEdit

Kim was diligent and only absorbed in the football. He extremely avoided harmful things to human body, and had ardor for training. His healthy habit made him continue his playing career until the age of forty.[3][6]

Career statisticsEdit

InternationalEdit

Source:[8][9]

  • Appearances and goals by national team and year
    National team Year Apps Goals
    Japan 1936 2 0
    1940 1 0
    Total 3 0
    South Korea 1948 2 0
    1950 1 1
    Total 3 1
    Career total 6 1
  • Appearances and goals by competition
    Competition Apps Goals
    Friendlies 2 1
    Summer Olympics 4 0
    Total 6 1
  • List of international goals scored by Kim Yong-sik
    No. Date Venue Cap Opponent Score Result Competition
    1 15 April 1950 Hong Kong 6   Hong Kong 1–0 6–3 Friendly

    Managerial statisticsEdit

    Team From To Record Ref.
    P W D L Win %
    South Korea April 1953 May 1953 5 3 1 1 060.00 [10][11]
    May 1954 June 1954 2 0 0 2 000.00 [10][12]
    November 1959 December 1959 2 1 0 1 050.00 [10][13]
    September 1960 June 1961 5 5 0 0 100.00 [10][14][15]
    September 1969 October 1969 4 1 2 1 025.00 [10][16]
    Total 18 10 3 5 055.56

    HonoursEdit

    PlayerEdit

    Soongsil College[4]

    Kyungsung FC

    Joseon Electrical Industry

    Individual

    ManagerEdit

    South Korea

    Yangzee

    ReferencesEdit

    1. ^ "Players Appearing for Two or More Countries". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 3 August 2008. Retrieved 1 July 2014.
    2. ^ "Kim Yong-sik". Olympedia. Retrieved 23 September 2021.
    3. ^ a b c d e f 축구의 대부 김용식(金容植) (in Korean). KOC. 30 September 2011.
    4. ^ a b c d 잃어버린 우리 축구사 복원 프로젝트 - 5화. '축구계의 손기정'을 한국은 잊었다 (in Korean). Storyfunding. 8 November 2016. Archived from the original on 20 December 2016. Retrieved 31 March 2019.
    5. ^ Evans, Hilary; Gjerde, Arild; Heijmans, Jeroen; Mallon, Bill; et al. "Kim Yong-Sik". Olympics at Sports-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Archived from the original on 4 December 2016.
    6. ^ a b c Kim, Hyeon-hoe (25 June 2010). [김현회] 당신의 축구 영웅은 누구인가요? (in Korean). Nate Sports.
    7. ^ 역대 대표팀 감독 (in Korean). KFA. Retrieved 19 June 2020.
    8. ^ "KIM Yong Sik". Japan National Football Team Database. 19 March 2016. Archived from the original on 19 March 2016.
    9. ^ "Kim Yong-sik at Korea Football Association" (in Korean). KFA. Retrieved 10 December 2021.
    10. ^ a b c d e "All-time managers" (in Korean). Korea Football Association. Retrieved 14 June 2020.
    11. ^ 경기결과 - 1953 (in Korean). KFA. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
    12. ^ 경기결과 - 1954 (in Korean). KFA. Retrieved 17 June 2020.
    13. ^ 경기결과 - 1959 (in Korean). KFA. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
    14. ^ a b 경기결과 - 1960 (in Korean). KFA. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
    15. ^ 경기결과 - 1961 (in Korean). KFA. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
    16. ^ 경기결과 - 1969 (in Korean). KFA. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
    17. ^ 朝鮮體育會主催,本社後援 第十二回全朝鮮蹴球大會. Naver.com (in Korean). Dong-A Ilbo. 7 November 1931. Retrieved 19 June 2020.
    18. ^ 전조선축구대회 (in Korean). KFA. Archived from the original on 11 November 2014. Retrieved 23 May 2020.
    19. ^ 决勝에强敵粉碎 京城蹴球優勝. Naver.com (in Korean). Dong-A Ilbo. 4 November 1935. Retrieved 17 June 2020.
    20. ^ a b 전국축구선수권대회 (in Korean). KFA. Archived from the original on 11 November 2014. Retrieved 23 May 2020.
    21. ^ '축구 명예의 전당'에서 한국 축구의 전통 세워나간다. (in Korean). KFA. 23 November 2006. Archived from the original on 4 December 2010. Retrieved 29 February 2020.
    22. ^ Fujioka, Atsushi; Halchuk, Stephen; Stokkermans, Karel (25 March 2020). "Asian Champions' Cup". RSSSF. Retrieved 2 September 2020.

    External linksEdit