Khalid bin Talal Al Saud

Khalid bin Talal Al Saud (Arabic: الأمير خالد بن طلال بن عبد العزيز آل سعود) (born 10 January 1962) is a member of the Saudi royal family and the owner of Al Nafood Trading Establishment.[1]

Khalid bin Talal Al Saud
Born (1962-01-10) 10 January 1962 (age 60)
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
OccupationBusinessman
Spouse(s)Jazzi bint Saud bin Abdulaziz Al Saud
Parents
Relatives
HouseAl Saud

Early lifeEdit

Prince Khalid was born on 10 January 1962 to the Lebanese Mona El Solh, daughter of Riad as-Solh, the first prime minister of Lebanon, and Prince Talal bin Abdulaziz.[1][2] He is full brother of Prince Al Waleed bin Talal.[3]

BackgroundEdit

The prisoner-exchange agreement signed between Israel and Hamas in October 2011 that arranged for the release of Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit and over 1,000 mainly Palestinian and Arab-Israeli prisoners was received with disapproval by some members of the Israeli public. Subsequent to this exchange, according to comments made by Saudi cleric Awad Al-Qarni and reiterated by Prince Khalid, one Israeli family offered $100,000 for the capture of a Palestinian man released under the deal who they believed was responsible for the 1998 death of one of their relatives.[4] As of late October 2011, news agencies were reporting at least two such $100,000 bounties on-offer by Israeli extremist groups for the killing of Palestinians who were released in the exchange and who they believe to have been responsible for the killing of Israelis.[5]

ControversyEdit

As part of conservative wing in Saudi royal family, Khalid said he had been forced to speak out after quiet efforts to advise his brother to mend his ways had fallen on deaf ears. Khalid, told an Arabic website that his brother's plan to introduce cinema into Saudi society was the straw that broke the camel's back. This was a reference to a Saudi film financed by Al Waleed bin Talal, and shown in Saudi Arabia in 2011 despite fierce opposition from Islamist activists.[6]

On 29 October 2011, Prince Khalid stated that he would give $900,000 for the capture of any Israeli soldier for use as bargaining leverage in potential future negotiations with Israel for the release of Palestinians held in Israeli prisons, variously estimated in late October 2011 as between 5,000 and 7,000 persons. Details provided about his announcement varied considerably among the many media outlets that covered it, with some apparent contradictions among them, and with some reports excluding any mention of the previous bounty offers made by Israeli groups that the Prince said prompted his offer.[7][8]

In what he described as a response to the $100,000 bounty offered by the Israeli family as described above, Saudi cleric Awad Al-Qarni offered his own bounty in the same $100,000 amount for the capture of any Israeli soldier, with the understanding that any soldier so captured would be used in a potential subsequent prisoner exchange to try to secure the release of some of the thousands of Palestinians who remain in Israeli prisons.[9] Awad Al-Qarni's offer of one hundred thousand dollars for the capture of an Israeli soldier was met with a counter-offer of one million dollars for the killing of the Muslim cleric. "Dr Awad al-Qarni said he was offering $100,000 to only take a prisoner but they responded by offering $1 million to kill Awad al-Qarni," Prince Khalid stated according to a recording of a telephone call he placed to a private Saudi television network, and that was published by that network on its website.[10]

In what he said was a response to the $1 million bounty offered by Israelis for the killing of Saudi cleric Awad Al-Qarni, Prince Khalid increased the cleric's offer of $100,000 for the capture of an Israeli soldier by $900,000, thus bringing the combined amount offered by the two men up to the same $1 million figure offered for the cleric's death. The Prince made the announcement in a 29 October 2011 telephone call to the Saudi kingdom's private al-Daleel television station.[11][12]

ArrestEdit

In December 2017, Khalid bin Talal was arrested for opposing the government's decision to remove the power of arrest from the Islamic religious police.[13] After almost a year, in November 2018, he was freed from detention, after pressure on Mohammad bin Salman due to the killing of Jamal Khashoggi.[14]

It was reported that he was re-arrested 4 days after his father's death in late December 2018.[15]

Personal lifeEdit

In 1988, Prince Khalid married Jazzi bint Saud bin Abdulaziz Al Saud in Riyadh.[citation needed] He is former president of Saudi's Al-Hilal Volleyball Club.[citation needed]

His son, Al Waleed bin Khalid bin Talal Al Saud, suffered from a traffic accident in Riyadh which caused him to be in a coma, at the king Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh. However it was reported that he was moved back home in early 2016 after a decade in the hospital as a "brain dead" patient.[2] In October 2020 he responded with his hand to his aunt. After that till present no improvement has been reported.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Khalid Talal Abdulaziz". Dhownet. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  2. ^ a b Gehan Aboella (18 January 2020). "'Sleeping Prince' Officially Declared Dead". Sada Elbalad News. Retrieved 10 October 2020.
  3. ^ Abdelhadi, Magdi (29 June 2009). "Saudi royal denounces his brother". BBC. Retrieved 3 April 2011.
  4. ^ Saudi prince backs cleric's bounty offer for Israeli soldier Archived 4 December 2015 at the Wayback Machine 29 October 2011, Reuters. Excerpt: ( Saudi cleric Awad Al-Qarni ) said on his Facebook page this week that he made the offer in response to a similar reward promised by an Israeli family for anyone who catches the person who killed one of its members in 1998, following a prisoner exchange agreement earlier this month of more than 1,000 Palestinians for the captive Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit.
  5. ^ Saudi royal offers bounty on Israeli soldiers Archived 31 October 2011 at the Wayback Machine 30 October 2011, Associated Press, via CBS News. Excerpt: In Israel, extremists have offered two rewards of $100,000 to anyone who kills a Palestinian released in the Shalit deal if the Palestinian killed Israelis... Extremist settler activist Baruch Marzel said he was familiar with the bounties and that there were a number of bereaved Israeli families who were looking to "settle the score" with the killers.
  6. ^ Magdi Abdelhadi (29 June 2009). "Saudi royal denounces his brother". BBC News Middle East. Archived from the original on 16 March 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2012.
  7. ^ Montrealers celebrate release of Israeli soldier Archived 5 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine. CTV News, 19 October 2011. Excerpt: As Schalit was welcomed home tens of thousands of Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank were also celebrating the release of their prisoners. Many are hoping Israel will make similar deals in the future, since more than 6,000 Palestinians remain in Israeli prisons.
  8. ^ Ukrainian mother of two among released Palestinian prisoners Archived 25 April 2012 at the Wayback Machine. RIA Novosti, 19 October 2011. Excerpt: There were about 8,200 Palestinian and Arab prisoners in Israeli jails before the (October 2011) prisoner swap, including 62 women and over 200 children, according to Palestinian estimates.
  9. ^ Saudi prince backs cleric's bounty offer for Israeli soldier Archived 4 December 2015 at the Wayback Machine. 29 October 2011, Reuters. Excerpt: Qarni said on his Facebook page this week that he made the offer in response to a similar reward promised by an Israeli family for anyone who catches the person who killed one of its members in 1998, following a prisoner exchange agreement earlier this month of more than 1,000 Palestinians for the captive Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit.
  10. ^ Saudi prince backs cleric's bounty offer for Israeli soldier Archived 4 December 2015 at the Wayback Machine, Reuters, 29 October 2011.
  11. ^ Saudi prince backs cleric's bounty offer for Israeli soldier Archived 4 December 2015 at the Wayback Machine 29 October 2011, Reuters. Excerpt: Prince Khalid bin Talal ... told Daleel television over the phone that he decided to contribute to Awad al-Qarni's bounty after the Saudi cleric received death threats for offering $100,000 to capture an Israeli soldier. "Dr Awad al-Qarni said he was offering $100,000 to only take a prisoner but they responded by offering $1 million to kill Awad al-Qarni," Prince Khalid said, according to a recording of the call published on Daleel's website. "I tell Dr. Awad al-Qarni, 'I will be in solidarity with you and pay the remaining $900,000 to take an Israeli soldier prisoner so that other prisoners can be freed,'" he added. Qarni said on his Facebook page this week that he made the offer in response to a similar reward promised by an Israeli family for anyone who catches the person who killed one of its members in 1998, following a prisoner exchange agreement earlier this month of more than 1,000 Palestinians for the captive Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit.
  12. ^ Saudi royal offers bounty on Israeli soldiers Archived 31 October 2011 at the Wayback Machine 30 October 2011, Associated Press, via CBS News. Excerpt: Prince Khalid said he made the offer in response to what he said were Israeli threats against Qarani's life.
  13. ^ Stancati, Margherita (10 January 2018). "Mohammed bin Salman's Next Saudi Challenge: Curtailing Ultraconservative Islam". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on 9 January 2018. Retrieved 9 January 2018.
  14. ^ "Saudi Arabia frees detained prince". BBC. 4 November 2018. Archived from the original on 4 November 2018. Retrieved 4 November 2018.
  15. ^ "Bin Salman re-arrests Prince Khalid bin Talal days after his father's death". Middle East Monitor. 28 December 2018. Archived from the original on 28 December 2018.