Kenneth Sacks is an American historian and classicist, noted for his work on Ralph Waldo Emerson.[1][2] Currently he serves as Professor of History and Classics at Brown University, where he was previously Dean of the College.[3]

A graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, Sacks received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, where he studied under Erich S. Gruen and Raphael Sealey. He then taught at the University of Wisconsin–Madison until 1995, when he joined Brown as Dean of the College.[4] The author of two books on Greek historians, Polybius on the Writing of History (1981) and Diodorus Siculus and the First Century (1990, a Choice "Outstanding Academic Book of 1991), he is most recently the author of Understanding Emerson: "The American Scholar" and His Struggle for Self-Reliance (2003).[5][6][7] Sacks is additionally the editor of the volume on Emerson for the Cambridge Texts in History of Political Thought.[8]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "A Look at Philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson". NPR.org. Retrieved 2019-02-06.
  2. ^ Updike, John (August 4, 2003). "Big Dead White Male: Ralph Waldo Emerson Turns Two Hundred". The New Yorker.
  3. ^ Geggel, Laura; February 10, Senior Writer |; ET, 2015 07:33am. "What If Alexander the Great Left His Empire to One Person?". Live Science. Retrieved 2019-02-25.
  4. ^ "97-145 (Dean of the College)". www.brown.edu. Retrieved 2019-02-06.
  5. ^ Benfey, Christopher (July 25, 2003). "Dangerously creative". The Times Literary Supplement.
  6. ^ Benfey, Christopher (2010-02-22). American Audacity: Literary Essays North and South. University of Michigan Press. ISBN 9780472025800.
  7. ^ Benfey, Christopher (2010-02-22). American Audacity: Literary Essays North and South. University of Michigan Press. ISBN 9780472025800.
  8. ^ "Emerson: Political Writings edited by Kenneth S. Sacks". Cambridge Core. May 2008. Retrieved 2019-02-06.