Ken Christy

Robert Kenneth Christy (November 23, 1894 — July 23, 1962), was an American television, film and radio character actor.

Ken Christy
Kenchristy.gif
Ken Christy in Lady Gangster (1942)
Born
Robert Kenneth Christy

(1894-11-23)November 23, 1894
DiedJuly 23, 1962(1962-07-23) (aged 67)
Years active1932-1962

Early lifeEdit

Born Robert Kenneth Christy, he was the second of three children of Alice Christy and Olivier B. Christy. He was born in Greenville, Pennsylvania. According to census records, Christy served in World War I.[1]

RadioEdit

The actor started his career on radio programs. From the early 1930s, he had a nearly three decade career on radio, with roles in such popular radio series as Little Orphan Annie, where he played Mr. Bonds, The Great Gildersleeve on which he was a regular as The Chief of Police, as well as portraying several dramatic roles on Suspense. A versatile artist, he was equally comfortable in serious minded programs, such as The Fifth Horseman, Gangbusters, Jack Armstrong, the All-American Boy, and The Saint[1]:133 as he was with comedy series like Amos 'n' Andy, A Day in the Life of Dennis Day,[2] and The Alan Young Show.

Film and televisionEdit

Christy appeared in 144 films and television programs between 1940 and 1962 and many of his films list him as uncredited. His first acting role was in the film Foreign Correspondent (1940) and his career ended with the television series Shannon (1962).

A 1950 newspaper article cited the predominance of police roles in Christy's film background, saying, "in 98 out of 100 film roles he has played an officer of the law."[3] Christy said,"I'd give anything to stop making arrests and be the guy who commits the crime for once."[3]

Christy's film credits include Burma Convoy (1941),Sunset Blvd as the homicide detective trying to question Norma Desmond, Tarzan's New York Adventure (1942), Cheaper by the Dozen (1950), A Place in the Sun (1951), Abbott and Costello Go to Mars (1953), Inside Detroit (1956), and Utah Blaine (1957).

His television credits include Gang Busters (1952), Meet Corliss Archer (1954), Death Valley Days (1955), I Love Lucy (1954–56), Celebrity Playhouse (1956), Dragnet (1957), and Wagon Train (1958), General Electric Theater (1959), M Squad (1960), and My Three Sons (1961).

Selected filmographyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Sies, Luther F. (2014). Encyclopedia of American Radio, 1920-1960, 2nd Edition, Volume 1. McFarland & Company, Inc. ISBN 978-0-7864-5149-4. P. 16.
  2. ^ The Definitive The Fifth Horseman Radio Log with Ken Christy
  3. ^ a b "Victoria". Pennsylvania, Shamokin. Shamokin News-Dispatch. October 6, 1950. p. 10. Retrieved February 4, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  

External linksEdit