Kate Raworth

Kate Raworth (born 1970) is an English economist working for the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. She is known for her work on 'doughnut economics', which she understands as an economic model that balances between essential human needs and planetary boundaries.[1]

Kate Raworth
Kate Raworth, 2018 (cropped).jpg
Kate Raworth in 2018
Born1970
NationalityBritish
InstitutionsUniversity of Oxford
University of Cambridge
InfluencesTim Jackson, Elinor Ostrom
Websitekateraworth.com

EducationEdit

Raworth achieved first class honours in Politics, Philosophy and Economics at the University of Oxford and followed it with an MSc in Development Economics.

Career in academiaEdit

From 1994 to 1997 Raworth worked promoting micro-enterprise development in Zanzibar as a Fellow of the Overseas Development Institute. From 1997 to 2001 she was economist and co-author of the United Nations Development Programme's Human Development Report, writing chapters on globalization, new technologies, resource consumption and human rights. From 2002 to 2013 she was a Senior Researcher at Oxfam.[2] She is currently a Senior Research Associate, Tutor and Advisory Board member of the Environmental Change Institute of the University of Oxford.[3][4] She is also a Senior Associate at the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership.[5]

In 2017, Raworth published Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist [6] which elaborates on her concept of Doughnut Economics, first developed in her 2012 paper, A Safe and Just Space for Humanity. Her 2017 book is a robust counter-proposal to mainstream economic thinking, and she advocates for conditions to create a sustainable economy. Raworth argues for a radical re-consideration of the foundations of Economic Science, and is particularly critical of the outdated principle of unfettered growth, in that it is destructive of planetary resources while ill-serving human needs including Quality of Life.[7] Instead of focusing on the growth of the economy, she focuses on a model where there can be ensured that everyone on Earth has access to their basic needs, such as adequate food and education, while not limiting opportunities for future generations by protecting our Ecosystem.[8][9][10] The book was longlisted for the 2017 Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award.

In 2020, Raworth was inaugurated as Professor of Practice at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences.[11] In this role, she serves as a strategic advisor to the Doughnut Hub: a place where students, lecturers and researchers, in collaboration with stakeholders in the Amsterdam area, develop knowledge based on the principles of her work.

In 2021, Raworth was appointed to the World Health Organization's Council on the Economics of Health For All, chaired by Mariana Mazzucato.[12]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "What on Earth is the Doughnut?…". 28 April 2013.
  2. ^ "Kate Raworth". Our World. United Nations University. Retrieved 1 February 2021.
  3. ^ "Finding the sweet-spot for the planet and humans: Kate Raworth to present her 'Big Idea' of doughnut economics for the 21st Century at the ECI". Environmental Change Institute. University of Oxford. 4 October 2017. Retrieved 1 February 2021.
  4. ^ "About". Kate Raworth. 28 April 2013.
  5. ^ "Kate Raworth, Senior Associate — Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership". www.cisl.cam.ac.uk. 5 November 2014.
  6. ^ "Search Results for Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist | Penguin Random House".
  7. ^ Toye, Richard (8 June 2017). "Doughnut Economics by Kate Raworth review – forget growth, think survival". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 February 2021.
  8. ^ "Book Review: Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think like a 21st-Century Economist by Kate Raworth". 17 June 2018.
  9. ^ Hughes, Kate (6 March 2018). "Only doughnut economics can save us, says influential 'renegade economist' Kate Raworth". inews.co.uk. Retrieved 1 February 2021.
  10. ^ Nugent, Ciara (22 January 2021). "Amsterdam Is Embracing a Radical New Economic Theory to Help Save the Environment. Could It Also Replace Capitalism?". time.com. TIME. Retrieved 27 January 2021.
  11. ^ "Kate Raworth inaugurated as first AUAS Professor of Practice - AUAS".
  12. ^ Global experts of new WHO Council on the Economics of Health For All announced World Health Organization (WHO), press release of May 6, 2021.

Further readingEdit

  • Kate Raworth (2017). Doughnut economics: seven ways to think like a 21st-century economist. New York, United States: Random House. ISBN 978-184794138-1.
  • Kate Raworth (2019). "Chapter 25: A new economics". In Extinction Rebellion (ed.). This Is Not a Drill: An Extinction Rebellion Handbook. Penguin Books. pp. 146–154. ISBN 9780141991443.

External linksEdit