Karahan Tepe

Karahan Tepe is an archaeological site in Şanlıurfa Province in Turkey. The site is close to Göbekli Tepe and archaeologists have also uncovered T-shaped stelae there. According to Daily Sabah, "The excavations have uncovered 250 obelisks featuring animal figures" as of 2020.[1][2]

Karahan Tepe
Karahan Tepe is located in Turkey
Karahan Tepe
Shown within Turkey
Karahan Tepe is located in Near East
Karahan Tepe
Karahan Tepe (Near East)
Karahan Tepe is located in Eastern Mediterranean
Karahan Tepe
Karahan Tepe (Eastern Mediterranean)
LocationKarahan Tepe, Şanlıurfa Province, Turkey
Coordinates37°05′31″N 39°18′05″E / 37.09194°N 39.30139°E / 37.09194; 39.30139Coordinates: 37°05′31″N 39°18′05″E / 37.09194°N 39.30139°E / 37.09194; 39.30139
History
PeriodsPre-Pottery Neolithic A to B

The site is located near Yağmurlu and roughly 46 kilometers east of Göbekli Tepe, which is often called its sister site.[3][4][5] It is part of the Göbeklitepe Culture and Karahantepe Excavations project. The area is known as “Keçilitepe” by local people. It is part of a region of similar sites now being uncovered known as the Taş Tepeler.[6][2]

HistoryEdit

The ancient structures at Karahan Tepe were discovered in 1997 by "researchers near the Kargalı neighborhood in the Tek Tek Mountains National Park."[7]

Necmi Karul, an archeologist at Istanbul University, told Anadolu Agency in 2019, “Last year, excavation work restarted in Karahantepe [Kectepe] – around 60 km from where Göbeklitepe is located – and we encountered traces of special structures, obelisks, animal sculptures, and descriptions as well as similar symbolism”.[8] The site was filled with dirt and rubble at some point, preserving T-topped columns carved into bedrock.[9] These structures have been described as 'phallic totems'.[2]

SiteEdit

In Karahantepe, the archaeological fills cover an area of almost 10 hectares, which increases by another five hectares if the quarries for the T-shaped columns are included.[10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Agency, Demirören News (2020-11-27). "New Karahantepe settlement may be older than Göbeklitepe". Daily Sabah. Retrieved 2020-12-07.
  2. ^ a b c Thomas, Sean. "Is an unknown, extraordinarily ancient civilisation buried under eastern Turkey? | The Spectator". www.spectator.co.uk. Retrieved 2022-05-24.
  3. ^ Thomas, Sean. "Is an unknown, extraordinarily ancient civilisation buried under eastern Turkey? | The Spectator". www.spectator.co.uk. Retrieved 2022-05-27.
  4. ^ Spray, Aaron (2021-10-31). "Karahan Tepe is Called The 'Sister Site' Of Gobekli Tepe In Turkey (And Is Just As Old)". TheTravel. Retrieved 2022-05-27.
  5. ^ Collins, Andrew. "Karahan Tepe: Göbekli Tepe's Sister Site - Another Temple of the Stars?". {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  6. ^ "Karahantepe on way to be new face of Turkey". Hürriyet Daily News. Retrieved 2020-12-07.
  7. ^ "Karahantepe excavations start in Şanlıurfa". Hürriyet Daily News. Retrieved 2020-12-07.
  8. ^ . The site was preserved in part by being filled in with dirt and rubble at some point preserving columns and carvings such as a large human face.Kazanci, Handan (8 March 2020). "Turkey: Conservation, not excavation, focus in Gobeklitepe". Anadolu Agency.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ https://arkeolojidergisi.ktb.gov.tr/TR-273118/yayin-arsivi.html
  10. ^ Karul, Necmi (2021). "Buried Buildings at Pre Pottery Neolithic Karahantepe / Karahantepe Çanak-Çömleksiz Neolitik Dönem Gömü Yapıları 2021". Türk Arkeoloji ve Etnografya Dergisi 86 (86): 22. ISSN 1302-9231.

Further readingEdit