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Kanzeon-ji in Dazaifu, Fukuoka
Kanzeon-ji's Nara period bell, a National Treasure
Inventory of Kanzeon-ji from 905, now in Tokyo; a National Treasure

Kanzeon-ji (観世音寺) is a seventh-century Buddhist temple in Dazaifu, Fukuoka, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. It was once the most important temple in Kyushu. Its bell, one of the oldest in the country, has been designated a National Treasure,[1] and in 1996 the Ministry of the Environment designated its sound as one of the 100 Soundscapes of Japan.[2][3] Many statues of the Heian period are Important Cultural Properties.

Contents

HistoryEdit

According to the Shoku Nihongi, Kanzeon-ji was founded by Emperor Tenji in honour of his mother Empress Saimei, but was still incomplete fifty years later when in 709 additional workers were assigned to finish the building. The temple had a south gate, middle gate, golden hall to the west, pagoda to the east and a lecture hall in the centre.[4] The temple's buildings were damaged and destroyed in a number of natural disasters and wars. The Kondō, 3x2 bays with mokoshi, and lecture hall were rebuilt in the Genroku era (1688-1703) and have been designated Prefectural Cultural Properties.[5] The grounds and ruins of Kanzeon-ji (観世音寺境内及び子院跡) were declared an Historic Site in 1970.[6]

TreasuresEdit

Kanzeon-ji houses a National Treasure and a number of statues and other items that are Important Cultural Properties:

A Heian period inventory of Kanzeon-ji (観世音寺資財帳) dating to 905 and now in Tokyo has been designated a National Treasure.[27]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Tangible Cultural Properties - Bell". Dazaifu City. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 30 March 2011.
  2. ^ "6G - Conservation of Good Sound Environment". Ministry of the Environment. Archived from the original on 29 July 2012. Retrieved 21 April 2011.
  3. ^ "Kanzeon-ji". Dazaifu Tenman-gū. Archived from the original on 16 July 2011. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  4. ^ McCallum, Donald F. (2009). The Four Great Temples. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 192–6. ISBN 978-0-8248-3114-1.
  5. ^ "Registered Cultural Properties - Buildings". Dazaifu City. Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 30 March 2011.
  6. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Assets". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 29 March 2011.[permanent dead link]
  7. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 21 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  8. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 23 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  9. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 23 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  10. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 1 August 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  11. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 29 March 2011.[permanent dead link]
  12. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 29 March 2011.[permanent dead link]
  13. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 15 September 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  14. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 21 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  15. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 31 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  16. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 20 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  17. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 29 March 2011.[permanent dead link]
  18. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 30 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  19. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 20 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  20. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 23 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  21. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 29 March 2011.[permanent dead link]
  22. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 31 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  23. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 31 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  24. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 28 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  25. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 22 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  26. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 20 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  27. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on 31 July 2012. Retrieved 29 March 2011.

Coordinates: 33°30′54″N 130°31′17″E / 33.51500°N 130.52139°E / 33.51500; 130.52139