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Kang Senghui (traditional: ; simplified: ; pinyin: Kāng Sēnghuì; Wade–Giles: K'ang Seng-hui;[1] Vietnamese: Khương Tăng Hội; died 280) was a Buddhist monk and translator during the Three Kingdoms period of ancient China. He was born in Jiaozhi (modern-day northern Vietnam).[2][3] He was the son of a Sogdian merchant, hence the last name of Kang, meaning "one whose forefathers had been people from Kangju", or Sogdia.[4] Kang received a Chinese literary education and was "widely read in the six (Confucian) classics."[5] He also read Sanskrit and was known for his knowledge of the Tripiñaka (the Buddhist canon).[6] He joined the saïgha (the Buddhist monastic order) as a teenager, following the death of his parents.[6] Kang contributed more to the diffusion of Buddhist sutras as a preacher than to their translation into the Chinese language as there are only two collections of avadānas in the canon which are attributed to him.[7] According to legend, the first Buddha relic in China appeared in a vase in 248 C.E. so that Kang Senghui would have something to show a local ruler. [8] Sun Quan, the king of Eastern Wu, would unsuccessfully attempt to destroy the tooth by subjecting it to various tests. [9]

Kang is known as Khương Tăng Hội in Vietnam[10][11] and Thông Biện (1096) claims scriptural traditions from Kang influenced Vietnamese Buddhism, though there is no independent evidence for this tradition.[12]

Khương Tăng Hội is regarded as the first Vietnamese patriarch of Zen Buddhism in Vietnam.[3]

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jacques Gernet (31 May 1996). A History of Chinese Civilization. Cambridge University Press. pp. 214–. ISBN 978-0-521-49781-7.
  2. ^ Trung Huynh (Spring 2016). The Early Development of Buddhism in the Red River Delta Basin, Jiaozhi, and Southern China: The Case of a Sogdian- Jiaozhi Buddhist Monk Kang Senghui 康僧會 (PDF) (A Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of the Department of Religious Studies University of the West In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy). p. 4.
  3. ^ a b Nguyễn Lang. "Việt Nam Phật giáo sử luận, tập 1, chương III: Khởi nguyên của thiền học tại Việt Nam - Khương Tăng Hội".
  4. ^ Zurcher, E. (Erik) (2007). The Buddhist conquest of China : the spread and adaptation of Buddhism in early medieval China (3rd ed.). Leiden: Brill. p. 23. ISBN 9789047419426. OCLC 646789866.
  5. ^ Zurcher, E. (Erik) (2007). The Buddhist conquest of China : the spread and adaptation of Buddhism in early medieval China (3rd ed.). Leiden: Brill. p. 47. ISBN 9789047419426. OCLC 646789866.
  6. ^ a b Zurcher, E. (Erik) (2007). The Buddhist conquest of China : the spread and adaptation of Buddhism in early medieval China (3rd ed.). Leiden: Brill. p. 51. ISBN 9789047419426. OCLC 646789866.
  7. ^ Zurcher, E. (Erik) (2007). The Buddhist conquest of China : the spread and adaptation of Buddhism in early medieval China (3rd ed.). Leiden: Brill. p. 53. ISBN 9789047419426. OCLC 646789866.
  8. ^ Strong 2007, p. 188.
  9. ^ Strong 2007, p. 192.
  10. ^ Tai Thu Nguyen (2008). The History of Buddhism in Vietnam. CRVP. pp. 36–. ISBN 978-1-56518-098-7.
  11. ^ Tai Thu Nguyen (2008). The History of Buddhism in Vietnam. CRVP. pp. 36–. ISBN 978-1-56518-098-7. Archived from the original on 31 January 2015.
  12. ^ Essays Into Vietnamese Pasts - Page 88 Keith Weller Taylor, John K. Whitmore - 1995 "Note also in this connection that, in 1096, Thông Biện, who could be considered responsible for the historical typology of Buddhism in Viet Nam, vaguely ascribed scriptural traditions to Mou Bo and Kang Senghui.21 Yet, there is absolutely no evidence whatsoever of any genealogy or doctrinal school that could be traced back to these two figures. Needless to say, neither Mou Bo nor.."

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