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KERW (101.3 MHz) is a non-commercial FM radio station that is licensed to Los Osos-Baywood Park, California and broadcasts to the San Luis Obispo, California area. Funded by listener donations, the station is owned by Santa Monica College and broadcasts an eclectic music format known as "Eclectic 24". The KERW transmitter is located off TV Towers Road on Cuesta Peak in Santa Margarita, California.[1]

KERW
CityLos Osos-Baywood Park, California
Broadcast areaSan Luis Obispo, California
Santa Maria-Lompoc, California
BrandingEclectic 24
Frequency101.3 MHz
Translator(s)106.9 MHz K295AH (Goleta, CA)
First air date1987
FormatEclectic
ERP3,600 watts
HAAT502 meters (1,647 ft)
ClassB
Facility ID63523
Callsign meaningSimilar to parent station KCRW
Former callsignsKEDZ (1986-1987)
KLZZ (1987-1990)
KSTT-FM (1990-2016)
KJRW (2016)
OwnerSanta Monica College
(Santa Monica Community College District)
Sister stationsKCRI, KCRU, KCRY, KDRW
WebcastListen Live
Websitewww.kcrw.com

Contents

HistoryEdit

The station at 101.3 FM first signed on the air in 1987 as KEDZ, but it soon changed its call sign to KLZZ.[2] It broadcast an adult contemporary music format from the beginning.[3]

KSTT-FMEdit

On March 9, 1989, Diaz Broadcasting sold KLZZ to Stratosphere Broadcasting L.P. (later Mondosphere Broadcasting Inc.) for $1.3 million.[4] On December 1, 1990, the station changed its call letters to KSTT-FM.[2][5]

The ownership of KSTT-FM changed several times in the decade of the 2000s. In September 2000, Mondosphere Broadcasting sold 11 stations throughout Central California, including KSTT-FM, plus a construction permit for a twelfth station, to Clear Channel Communications Inc. (now iHeartMedia) for $45 million.[6] In July 2007, the station was one of 16 Clear Channel outlets in California and Arizona purchased by El Dorado Broadcasters for $40 million.[7]

KERWEdit

In early 2016, El Dorado Broadcasters began divesting its stations on the Central Coast. On May 31, the company sold the intellectual property of KSTT-FM, branded "Coast 101.3", to American General Media, who placed the call letters and AC format on KIQO (102.5 FM). The 101.3 FM frequency itself was not sold but remained with El Dorado and adopted the call sign KJRW.[2][8]

In July 2016, El Dorado donated KJRW to Santa Monica College, owner of public radio station KCRW.[9] The last in a series of divestments by El Dorado, the donation was consummated on September 15. On November 7, KERW began simulcasting "Eclectic 24", KCRW's adult album alternative-formatted HD2 subchannel.[10][11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Predicted Coverage Area for KERW 101.3 FM". Radio-Locator.com. Retrieved August 2, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c "Call Sign History: KERW". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access. U.S. Federal Communications Commission. Retrieved August 2, 2018.
  3. ^ "Directory of Radio Stations in the U.S." (PDF). Broadcasting and Cable Market Place 1992. Broadcasting Publications Inc. 1992. p. A-39. Retrieved August 2, 2018.
  4. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications Inc. April 3, 1989. p. 81. Retrieved August 2, 2018.
  5. ^ "For the Record" (PDF). Broadcasting. Broadcasting Publications Inc. December 31, 1990. p. 81. Retrieved August 2, 2018.
  6. ^ "Changing Hands" (PDF). Broadcasting and Cable. R.R. Bowker. September 18, 2000. p. 39. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  7. ^ "Price For 16 AZ, CA Clear Channel Stations: $40 Million". AllAccess.com. All Access Music Group. July 11, 2007. Retrieved May 3, 2018.
  8. ^ Venta, Lance (June 24, 2016). "KSTT San Luis Obispo IP to Move to 104.5 KIQO". RadioInsight. RadioBB Networks. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  9. ^ Venta, Lance (July 25, 2016). "KJRW San Luis Obispo Donated To KCRW". RadioInsight. RadioBB Networks. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  10. ^ "KJRW 101.3 FM San Luis Obispo Donated To KCRW". Radio Discussions.
  11. ^ "New York Times Features El Dorado Donation Of KERW/San Luis Obispo To KCRW In Report On Unusual Charitable Donations". AllAccess.com. All Access Music Group. December 2, 2016. Retrieved August 2, 2018.

External linksEdit