June 1955 lunar eclipse

A penumbral lunar eclipse took place at the Moon's ascending of the orbit on Sunday, June 5, 1955 with a penumbral eclipse magnitude of 0.62181 (62.181%). A penumbral lunar eclipse takes place when the Moon moves through the faint, outer part of Earth's shadow, the penumbra. This type of eclipse is not as dramatic as other types of lunar eclipses and is often mistaken for a regular Full Moon. The Moon shines because its surface reflects the Sun's rays. A lunar eclipse happens when the Earth comes between the Sun and the Moon and blocks some or all of the Sun's light from reaching the Moon. A penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the Sun, Earth, and the Moon are imperfectly aligned. When this happens, the Earth blocks some of the Sun's light from directly reaching the Moon's surface and covers all or part of the Moon with the outer part of its shadow, also known as the penumbra. Since the penumbra is much fainter than the dark core of the Earth's shadow, the umbra, a penumbral eclipse of the Moon is often difficult to tell apart from a normal Full Moon. Occurring only 0.5 days after apogee (Apogee on June 5, 1955), the moon's apparent diameter was 6.5% smaller than average (1888 arcseconds).[1]

Lunar eclipse chart close-1955Jun05.png

VisibilityEdit

The penumbral eclipse was visible in Asia, Australia, Pacific, seen rising over Africa/western Indian Ocean and setting over the Pacific.

 

Related lunar eclipsesEdit

Lunar year seriesEdit

Lunar eclipse series sets from 1955–1958
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Date
Viewing
Type
Chart
Saros Date
Viewing
Type
Chart
110 1955 Jun 5
 
Penumbral
 
115 1955 Nov 29
 
Partial
 
120 1956 May 24
 
Partial
 
125 1956 Nov 18
 
Total
 
130 1957 May 13
 
Total
 
135 1957 Nov 7
 
Total
 
140 1958 May 3
 
Partial
 
145 1958 Oct 27
 
Penumbral
 
Last set 1954 Jul 16 Last set 1955 Jan 8
Next set 1958 Apr 4 Next set 1959 Sep 17

Half-Saros cycleEdit

A lunar eclipse will be preceded and followed by solar eclipses by 9 years and 5.5 days (a half saros).[2] This lunar eclipse is related to two partial solar eclipses of Solar Saros 117.

May 30, 1946 June 10, 1964
   

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Hermit Eclipse: Saros cycle 110
  2. ^ Mathematical Astronomy Morsels, Jean Meeus, p.110, Chapter 18, The half-saros

External linksEdit