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Julian Daryl Richards is a British archaeologist. He is a professor at the University of York, the director of the Archaeology Data Service (ADS),[1] and the editor of Internet Archaeology.[2] He is also the director of the Centre for Digital Heritage at the university, and the founding director of The White Rose College of the Arts & Humanities.[1] His research focuses on the archaeological applications of information technology, as well as on Anglo-Saxon and Viking archaeology. He has led excavations at Cottam, Cowlam, Burdale, Wharram Percy, and Heath Wood barrow cemetery.[1]

CareerEdit

 
Sea-faring Danes depicted invading England, from the Miscellany on the Life of St. Edmund, c. 1130 AD

Richards studied archaeology and anthropology at the University of Cambridge, after switching from history. He began his Ph.D. in 1980, researching burial rituals among pre-Christian Anglo-Saxons. In the 1970s or 1980s Richards took part in the excavations of Viking Age settlements around the Coppergate Shopping Centre in York, which eventually yielded the Anglo-Saxon Coppergate helmet. He then spent time at the University of Leeds, before returning to York in 1986 to lecture about Anglo-Saxon and Viking archaeology at the University of York.[1]

Richards is a professor at the University of York, concentrating on Anglo-Saxon and Viking Age archaeology, particularly mortuary behaviour and settlement evolution, in England. In that capacity he published Viking Age England in 1991,[3] and has led excavations at Cottam, Cowlam, Burdale, Wharram Percy, and Heath Wood barrow cemetery, the only Viking cremation cemetery in Britain. As of February 2018, he is exploring a winter camp used by the Great Viking Army at Torksey,[1][4][5] stretching over 136 acres (55 ha).[6][7]

Another concentration of Richards is the intersection of archaeology and technology. In 1985 he co-edited a textbook on archaeological computing, Current Issues in Archaeological Computing,[8] a focus of subsequent books and papers.[1] He is the director of the Archaeology Data Service, a digital archive of archaeological research,[1] and the co-director of Internet Archaeology, an electronic peer-reviewed journal.[2] He is also the director the Centre for Digital Heritage at the University of York, and has been the founding director of The White Rose College of the Arts & Humanities since October 2013.[1]

PublicationsEdit

  • Richards, Julian D. (1992). "Anglo Saxon Symbolism". In Carver, Martin (ed.). The Age of Sutton Hoo: The seventh century in north-western Europe. Woodbridge: Boydell Press. pp. 131–147.
  • Richards, Julian D.; Hadley, Dawn M. (2016). "The Viking Winter Camp and Anglo-Scandinavian Town at Torksey, Lincolnshire – The Landscape Context". In Turner, Val E.; Owen, Olwyn A.; Waugh, Doreen J. (eds.). Shetland and the Viking World: Papers from the Seventeenth Viking Congress, Lerwick. Lerwick: Shetland Amenities Trust. pp. 127–139. ISBN 978-0-9932740-3-9.
  • Hadley, Dawn M.; Richards, Julian D. (September 2016). "The Winter Camp of the Viking Great Army, AD 872–3, Torksey, Lincolnshire" (PDF). The Antiquaries Journal. Society of Antiquaries of London. 96: 23–67. doi:10.1017/s0003581516000718.  

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