Judo at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Judo at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo featured around 393, 128 judoka (柔道家: judo practitioners) competing in 15 events, seven each for both men and women as well as a new mixed team event.[1] The 2020 Summer Olympics were postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic,[2][3] and the judo competitions were held in July 2021 at Nippon Budokan.

Judo
at the Games of the XXXII Olympiad
Judo, Tokyo 2020.svg
Judo pictogram for the 2020 Summer Olympics
VenueNippon Budokan
Dates24–31 July 2021
Competitors393, 128 from 128 nations
← 2016
2024 →
Judo venue of the 2020 Summer Olympics.jpg

The tournament brackets were drawn on 23 July, with the top 8 judoka in each weight class seeded.[4][5]

QualificationEdit

A total of 393, 128 athletes could qualify for judo at the 2020 Summer Olympics. The 2020 Olympics were postponed to 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[6] Each NOC could enter a maximum of 14 judokas (one in each division). Host nation Japan has reserved a spot in each of all 14 events, while twenty are made available to NOCs through a Tripartite Commission Invitation.

The remaining judoka underwent a qualifying process to earn a spot for the Games through the world ranking list prepared by International Judo Federation on June 28, 2021,[7][8] and finalized on 5 July.[9]

The top 18 athletes in each division directly qualify, though each NOC is subjected to a limit of 1 judoka per division. If the NOC contains more than a single athlete ranked in the top 18 of the world ranking list, the NOC can decide which of their athletes obtain the quota places.

Further continental quotas (13 men and 12 women for Europe, 12 of each gender for Africa, 10 men and 11 women for Pan America, 10 of each gender for Asia, and 5 of each gender for Oceania are also available. These quotas are assigned by creating a list of all athletes for each continent across all divisions and both genders. The top-ranked athletes qualify in turn, subject to the general rule of 1 athlete per NOC per division as well as the additional rule that each NOC may only qualify one judoka through the continental quotas (that is, ensuring that 100 different NOCs are represented through this qualification system).

Mixed team qualification was based on NOCs qualifying enough individual judokas across various divisions to have a six-person team meeting specific requirements (one man and one woman in each of three groups of divisions).

Gender Day 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Men Weight class 60 66 73 81 90 100 +100
Participants 23 27 36 35 33 25 22
Women Weight class 48 52 57 63 70 78 +78
Participants 28 29 25 31 28 24 27

Competition scheduleEdit

[10][11]

Q Elimination & Quarterfinal F Repechage, Semifinal, Bronze medal & Gold medal
Event↓/Date → Sat 24 Sun 25 Mon 26 Tue 27 Wed 28 Thu 29 Fri 30 Sat 31
Men's
Men's 60 kg Q F
Men's 66 kg Q F
Men's 73 kg Q F
Men's 81 kg Q F
Men's 90 kg Q F
Men's 100 kg Q F
Men's +100 kg Q F
Women's
Women's 48 kg Q F
Women's 52 kg Q F
Women's 57 kg Q F
Women's 63 kg Q F
Women's 70 kg Q F
Women's 78 kg Q F
Women's +78 kg Q F
Mixed team
Mixed team Q F

Participating nationsEdit

Source: [12]

CompetitorsEdit

Medal summaryEdit

Medal tableEdit

  *   Host nation (Japan)

RankNOCGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  Japan*92112
2  France2338
3  Kosovo2002
4  Georgia1304
5  Czech Republic1001
6  Germany0123
  Mongolia0123
  South Korea0123
9  Austria0112
10  Chinese Taipei0101
  Cuba0101
  Slovenia0101
13  ROC0033
14  Brazil0022
  Canada0022
  Italy0022
17  Azerbaijan0011
  Belgium0011
  Great Britain0011
  Hungary0011
  Israel0011
  Kazakhstan0011
  Netherlands0011
  Portugal0011
  Ukraine0011
  Uzbekistan0011
Totals (26 NOCs)15153060

Men's eventsEdit

Games Gold Silver Bronze
Extra-lightweight (60 kg)
details
Naohisa Takato
  Japan
Yang Yung-wei
  Chinese Taipei
Yeldos Smetov
  Kazakhstan
Luka Mkheidze
  France
Half-lightweight (66 kg)
details
Hifumi Abe
  Japan
Vazha Margvelashvili
  Georgia
An Ba-ul
  South Korea
Daniel Cargnin
  Brazil
Lightweight (73 kg)
details
Shohei Ono
  Japan
Lasha Shavdatuashvili
  Georgia
An Chang-rim
  South Korea
Tsend-Ochiryn Tsogtbaatar
  Mongolia
Half-middleweight (81 kg)
details
Takanori Nagase
  Japan
Saeid Mollaei
  Mongolia
Shamil Borchashvili
  Austria
Matthias Casse
  Belgium
Middleweight (90 kg)
details
Lasha Bekauri
  Georgia
Eduard Trippel
  Germany
Davlat Bobonov
  Uzbekistan
Krisztián Tóth
  Hungary
Half-heavyweight (100 kg)
details
Aaron Wolf
  Japan
Cho Gu-ham
  South Korea
Jorge Fonseca
  Portugal
Niyaz Ilyasov
  ROC
Heavyweight (+100 kg)
details
Lukáš Krpálek
  Czech Republic
Guram Tushishvili
  Georgia
Teddy Riner
  France
Tamerlan Bashaev
  ROC

Women's eventsEdit

Games Gold Silver Bronze
Extra-lightweight (48 kg)
details
Distria Krasniqi
  Kosovo
Funa Tonaki
  Japan
Daria Bilodid
  Ukraine
Mönkhbatyn Urantsetseg
  Mongolia
Half-lightweight (52 kg)
details
Uta Abe
  Japan
Amandine Buchard
  France
Odette Giuffrida
  Italy
Chelsie Giles
  Great Britain
Lightweight (57 kg)
details
Nora Gjakova
  Kosovo
Sarah-Léonie Cysique
  France
Jessica Klimkait
  Canada
Tsukasa Yoshida
  Japan
Half-middleweight (63 kg)
details
Clarisse Agbegnenou
  France
Tina Trstenjak
  Slovenia
Maria Centracchio
  Italy
Catherine Beauchemin-Pinard
  Canada
Middleweight (70 kg)
details
Chizuru Arai
  Japan
Michaela Polleres
  Austria
Madina Taimazova
  ROC
Sanne van Dijke
  Netherlands
Half-heavyweight (78 kg)
details
Shori Hamada
  Japan
Madeleine Malonga
  France
Anna-Maria Wagner
  Germany
Mayra Aguiar
  Brazil
Heavyweight (+78 kg)
details
Akira Sone
  Japan
Idalys Ortiz
  Cuba
Iryna Kindzerska
  Azerbaijan
Romane Dicko
  France

Mixed eventsEdit

Games Gold Silver Bronze
Mixed team[13]
details
  France
Clarisse Agbegnenou
Amandine Buchard
Guillaume Chaine
Axel Clerget
Sarah-Léonie Cysique
Romane Dicko
Alexandre Iddir
Kilian Le Blouch
Madeleine Malonga
Margaux Pinot
Teddy Riner
  Japan
Hifumi Abe
Uta Abe
Chizuru Arai
Shori Hamada
Hisayoshi Harasawa
Shoichiro Mukai
Takanori Nagase
Shohei Ono
Akira Sone
Miku Tashiro
Aaron Wolf
Tsukasa Yoshida
  Germany
Johannes Frey
Karl-Richard Frey
Jasmin Grabowski
Katharina Menz
Dominic Ressel
Giovanna Scoccimarro
Sebastian Seidl
Theresa Stoll
Martyna Trajdos
Eduard Trippel
Anna-Maria Wagner
Igor Wandtke
  Israel
Tohar Butbul
Raz Hershko
Li Kochman
Inbar Lanir
Sagi Muki
Timna Nelson-Levy
Peter Paltchik
Shira Rishony
Or Sasson
Gili Sharir
Baruch Shmailov

New rulesEdit

Judo, the sports first introduced in 1964 Tokyo Olympics, has changed and evolved over time. There were several rule changes made to empower this sports in the 2020 Summer Olympics.

Based on the 2016 IJF Judo rule changes, the game time for men has shortened one minute and the length of a game became four minutes which is the same as women's game. There was also a change in scores of a Waza-Ari, a technic that requires a judoka to pin his/her opponent for 10 to 20 seconds or to throw the opponent successfully but not well-controlled to be awarded as Ippon. As basic Judo rules, there are three ways to win: 1)to throw the opponent to the ground in a certain efficiency, 2) to hold down the opponent for 20 seconds, 3) to force the opponent to submission by arm lock or strangulation. Originally, gaining points of Ippon ended the game but now Waza-aris are awarded equally to Ippons in the 2020 summer Olympics. With this rule change, penalty scores no longer ended the game.[5] In addition, the mixed team competition was added as a new content of Judo games in the Olympics. Six individuals in their national mixed team compete with individuals of the same weight category from another national team. A team wins when it won at least four rounds of six. This new content aims to engage in gender equality as well as a union through sport.[14]

In addition, the mixed team competition was added as a new content of Judo games in the Olympics. Six individuals in their national mixed team compete with individuals of the same weight category from another national team. A team wins when it won at least four rounds of six. This new content aims to engage in gender equality as well as a union through sport. It is considered one of the most gender equal competition in Olympic games[15] France, the next summer olympic host country, became the very first team to gain a gold medal for this new competition of mixed teams. It defeated Japan with 4-1. This was considered as a memorable moment of judo games in the 2020 Summer Olympics.[16]

Politically motivated withdrawalEdit

Selected to compete at the 2020 Summer Games in the -73 kg weight class, Algerian judoka Fethi Nourine and his coach Amar Benikhlef announced his withdrawal following the conclusion of the draw of competitors.

Nourine was quoted as saying his political support for the Palestinian cause made it impossible for him to compete against an Israeli; Tohar Butbul, the #5 seed in the tournament, whom he was drawn to potentially face in the second round (had he won in the first round), was Israeli.[17][18][19][20]

The International Judo Federation (IJF) announced the immediate suspension of Nourine and his coach on 24 July 2021, pending a further investigation, while the Algerian Olympic Committee revoked their accreditation, and sent Nourine and his coach back home to Algeria.[21][22] The Federation explained:

"According to the IJF rules, in line with the Olympic Charter and especially with rule 50.2 that provides for the protection of the neutrality of sport at the Olympic Games and the neutrality of the Games themselves, which states that 'no kind of demonstration or political, religious or racial propaganda is permitted in any Olympic sites, venues or other areas,' Fethi Nourine and Amar Benikhlef are now suspended and will face a decision by the IJF Disciplinary Commission, as well as disciplinary sanctions by the National Olympic Committee of Algeria back in their country.'"[20]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Tokyo 2020: Judo". Retrieved 13 July 2018.
  2. ^ "IOC, IPC, Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee and Tokyo Metropolitan Government Announce New Dates for the Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020". olympic.org. IOC. 30 March 2020. Archived from the original on 30 March 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
  3. ^ "IOC, IPC, Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee and Tokyo Metropolitan Government announce new dates for the Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 - Olympic News". International Olympic Committee. 15 July 2021. Retrieved 10 October 2021.
  4. ^ Lasuen, Pedro (5 July 2021). "Olympic Qualification Final List". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 6 July 2021.
  5. ^ a b "Judo | Olympic Sport". Tokyo 2020. Archived from the original on 3 July 2021. Retrieved 10 October 2021.
  6. ^ "Joint Statement from the International Olympic Committee and the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee". IOC. 24 March 2020. Retrieved 15 April 2022.
  7. ^ "Tokyo 2020 – IJF Qualification System" (pdf). Tokyo 2020. IJF. Retrieved 19 July 2020.
  8. ^ "IJF Olympic Qualification List" (PDF). IJF. Retrieved 23 June 2021.
  9. ^ Messner, Nicolas (28 June 2021). "The Day of Reckoning Has Come". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 28 June 2021.
  10. ^ "Schedule - Judo Tokyo 2020 Olympics". Olympian Database. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  11. ^ "Judo Competition Schedule". Tokyo 2020. 23 April 2018. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  12. ^ "Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 — Nations". International Judo Federation. Retrieved 6 July 2021.
  13. ^ "France become first judo mixed team gold medallist". Tokyo 2020. Archived from the original on 10 October 2021. Retrieved 10 October 2021.
  14. ^ "What is the new judo mixed team event?". Tokyo 2020. Archived from the original on 2 August 2021. Retrieved 30 September 2021.
  15. ^ "What is the new judo mixed team event?". Tokyo 2020. Archived from the original on 2 August 2021. Retrieved 30 September 2021.
  16. ^ "France become first judo mixed team gold medallist". Tokyo 2020. Archived from the original on 10 October 2021. Retrieved 10 October 2021.
  17. ^ "Judo athlete sent home from Olympics after refusing to fight Israeli".
  18. ^ "Algerian judoka sent home from Olympics after refusing to face Israeli opponent". Metro. 24 July 2021.
  19. ^ "Algerian judoka sent home from Olympics after refusing to compete against Israeli". The Guardian. 24 July 2021.
  20. ^ a b "Algerian judoka suspended after quitting Olympics rather than facing Israeli opponent". Yahoo.
  21. ^ "Algerian judoka Fethi Nourine suspended and sent home for withdrawing to avoid Israeli". The Japan Times. 24 July 2021.
  22. ^ "Fethi Nourine and Amar Benikhlef: Disciplinary Sanctions". International Judo Federation.

External linksEdit