East European Politics

East European Politics is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering the government, politics and societies of the post-communist space, including East Central Europe, the Baltic republics, South Eastern Europe, Russia, and all the countries of the former Soviet Union. It is published quarterly (4 issues per year) by Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group). The Editorial team consists of Senior Editors Adam Fagan (King's College London) and Petr Kopecky (Leiden University), Editors Lenka Bustikova (Arizona State University), Andrea L. P. Pirro (Scuola Normale Superiore) and Maria Spirova (Leiden University), as well as Editorial Asstant David Gazsi (King's College London).

East European Politics  
EEP cover.JPG
DisciplinePolitical science, European studies, Area studies, International relations
LanguageEnglish
Edited byAdam Fagan, Petr Kopecky, Lenka Bustikova, Andrea L. P. Pirro, Maria Spirova
Publication details
HistoryJournal of Communist Studies (1984–1991), Journal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics (1992–2011), East European Politics (2012–present)
Publisher
FrequencyQuarterly
Standard abbreviations
ISO 4East Eur. Politics
Indexing
ISSN2159-9165 (print)
2159-9173 (web)
OCLC no.701552682
Links

Journal informationEdit

East European Politics publishes original scholarship on political developments in individual countries, together with cross-country comparative analyses and studies relating the post-communist region to other parts of the world.

In addition to research articles and book reviews, East European Politics also publishes thematic special issues. The journal also publishes regular ‘symposium’ sections and review articles devoted to briefer analysis of particular events, political issues and important theoretical and conceptual developments. All research articles published in East European Politics have undergone rigorous peer review, based on initial editor screening and anonymized refereeing by at least two anonymous referees.[1]

Publication historyEdit

The Journal of Communist Studies was founded in 1984 by a group of scholars (Michael Waller, Richard Gillespie, Ron Hill, David Goodman, David Bell, and Michael Williams) with a shared intellectual interest in communist political systems, successors to an editorial team that had produced Documents in communist affairs (published in the early 1980s by Butterworths) and other publications dealing with the communist movement. While the journal set out to reflect the growing complexity of the communist world and movements, in the 1980s, its focus was on the ‘core’ countries and parties that had historically been part of the world of the Communist International. The primary emphasis was on politics, but history, sociology, non-technical economics, biography, and comparative studies also featured.

In 1992, and Transition Politics was added to the title to reflect changing realities. Following the change of title, the scope both widened, to embrace regime change and democratisation, and in practice also narrowed, to concentrate somewhat more on political analysis. The volumes published under the revised title included analyses of the politics and political science of the new democracies, several of which are now considered to be seminal works.[2]

Since 2012, the journal is published under the title East European Politics.

Abstracting and indexingEdit

Articles appearing in the journal are abstracted and indexed in Scopus, EBSCOhost including International Political Science Abstracts Database, Political Science Complete, International Security & Counter Terrorism Reference Center and Public Affairs Index; Periodicals Index Online, CSA Worldwide Political Science Abstracts, Environmental Sciences and Pollution Management, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences and Sociological Abstracts (Online), among others.[3]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "East European Politics". www.tandfonline.com. Retrieved 2017-03-12.
  2. ^ Fagan, Adam; Kopecky, Petr (2012). "East European politics (Editorial)". East European Politics. 28 (1): 1–3. doi:10.1080/21599165.2011.645372.
  3. ^ "East European Politics". www.tandfonline.com. Retrieved 2017-03-12.

External linksEdit